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Brush Up on Fall Allergies Before Tackling the Leaves

Posted 26 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Nov. 26, 2017 – Fall yardwork can stir up allergies, but there are ways to reduce the risk of flare-ups, an ear, nose and throat specialist says. "Know your triggers and avoid those triggers," said Dr. Do-Yeon Cho, an assistant professor of otolaryngology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. "First, find out if you're allergic to any seasonal pollens," Cho said in a university news release. "Your ENT [ear, nose and throat specialist] or allergist can easily figure out allergic culprits by doing simple skin tests or blood work." Unlike sniffles caused by cold viruses, allergy-related itchy eyes and sneezes stem from an immune system reaction to certain substances. If you have seasonal allergies, limit outdoor activities during that specific season. Wear a mask if doing yardwork. And change clothing and shower as soon as you get indoors because pollen and other allergens ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Vistaril, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Xyzal, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine, Anaphylaxis

Working With Your School Nurse

Posted 3 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 3, 2017 – Nearly 18 percent of kids have a chronic health condition, such as asthma or allergies. If your child is one of them, working successfully with your school's nurse will help keep him or her safe. Because a good chunk of a child's day is spent in school, it's important to communicate clearly and regularly with this key member of the administration. Start every school year with a visit to the nurse's office to drop off medication and paperwork from your pediatrician. The nurse will likely develop an individualized health care plan, or IHCP, that's based on the doctor's written action plan. Depending on your child's age, the medication permission form will state if he or she can carry and use medication on his or her own, although the school may have its own rules about this. Be very specific in your discussions. For example, if your child has asthma, the school ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Asthma - Maintenance, Claritin, Vistaril, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fluticasone

Does Your Medication Make You a Worse Driver?

Posted 1 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 1, 2017 – Is that sleeping pill you took last night making it tougher for you to drive in the daytime? What about a heart medication? Or a new antidepressant? New research shows that many people taking prescription drugs aren't aware that their meds could impair their ability to drive. "Most are aware of the potential dangerous side effects of sedatives and narcotics, but other medications – such as some antihistamines, some antidepressants, some blood pressure medications, muscle relaxants and even stimulants – may affect driving ability," noted Dr. Alan Mensch, who reviewed the study findings. The findings have both medical and legal implications, added Mensch, who's medical director at Plainview Hospital in New York. "Not commonly appreciated is that a DUI (driving under the influence) charge may not only involve alcohol or illegal substances. Drivers can also be ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Klonopin, Clonazepam, Ativan, Valium, Amitriptyline, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Diazepam, Benadryl, Promethazine, Nortriptyline, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Elavil, Temazepam, Claritin, Vistaril, Loratadine, Allegra

Kids' Food Allergies, Especially to Peanuts, Are on the Rise

Posted 27 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 27, 2017 – The number of U.S. children allergic to peanuts has increased by 21 percent since 2010, with nearly 2.5 percent of youngsters now having this type of allergy, a new study has found. Peanut allergies aren't the only ones on the rise, however. The researchers surveyed more than 53,000 households nationwide between October 2015 and September 2016 and found that rates of tree nut, shellfish, fin fish and sesame allergies among children also are increasing. For example, tree nut allergy rose 18 percent since 2010, and shellfish allergy increased 7 percent, according to the study. The findings were scheduled to be presented Oct. 27-30 at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology's annual meeting, in Boston. The study also found that black children are much more likely to have certain food allergies than white children. "According to our data, the risk of ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Vistaril, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Xyzal, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine, Anaphylaxis

Can Man's Best Friend Chase Away Eczema, Asthma?

Posted 27 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 27, 2017 – Parents of children struggling with eczema or asthma might think that having a dog would only make it harder to control their child's condition. But two new studies suggest man's furry best friend might actually provide some protection against allergic diseases. The first study contends that having a dog in the house before you're even born may help keep eczema at bay at least until your toddler years. The skin disorder is marked by dry, extremely itchy patches. "Eczema is usually the first manifestation of [allergic disease] and eczema can predict the development of other [allergic diseases] as kids grow," said study author Dr. Gagandeep Cheema, an allergy and immunology fellow at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. The researchers analyzed 782 mother-child pairs and collected data on prenatal exposure to dogs, which included days where a dog spent at least one ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Asthma - Maintenance, Claritin, Vistaril, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fluticasone

Many Food Allergies May Develop in Adulthood

Posted 27 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 27, 2017 – Is the roof of your mouth itchy after a peanut butter sandwich? Does your skin break out in hives after you've cracked your way through a lobster dinner? It's possible you're one of the many adults who developed a food allergy as an adult, a new study says. Researchers surveyed adults with food allergies and found that nearly half said that one or more of their allergies began in adulthood. "Food allergies are often seen as a condition that begins in childhood, so the idea that 45 percent of adults with food allergies develop them in adulthood is surprising," said study lead author Dr. Ruchi Gupta. She is with Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. Shellfish is the most common food allergy among U.S. adults, currently at 3.6 percent. That's a 44 percent increase from the rate of 2.5 percent reported in a 2004 study. The new study also ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Vistaril, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Xyzal, Periactin

Exercising With Asthma or Allergies

Posted 20 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 20, 2017 – Allergies and asthma can make exercise more challenging. But if your condition is well managed and you take a few precautions, you should be able to work out without worry. Know your allergy or asthma triggers and exercise around them. For instance, when the pollen count is high, exercise indoors with windows and doors closed. When you do exercise outside, avoid high-allergen areas like grassy fields, parks and heavily trafficked roads. Dry air can be particularly irritating to people with asthma while moist air often makes exercise easier. That might mean skipping endurance activities like cross-country skiing in favor of swimming in an indoor pool. When exercising outdoors, breathe through your nose rather than your mouth as much as possible – nasal passages filter air and trap allergens and irritants. Long-distance running and high-energy basketball are ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Asthma - Maintenance, Claritin, Vistaril, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fluticasone, Ribavirin, Qvar

Plan an Allergy-Safe Halloween for Your Child

Posted 15 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Oct. 14, 2017 – Halloween's frights extend beyond goblins and ghouls if you're a child with food allergies or asthma. "You want Halloween to be scary for the right reasons – ghosts, goblins and witches – not allergies and asthma," said allergist Dr. Stephen Tilles, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. "If you follow a few common-sense rules, you should be able to keep your kids safe and the party going without allergy and asthma symptoms," he said in an association news release. Here, Tilles offers parents tips on how to limit the risk of allergic reactions: Don't let children consume any candy that isn't clearly labeled for indications of potential allergens. Have them bring all goodies home for you to inspect, or drop off safe treats for your child with friends and at school. Does your child have asthma? Keep an inhaler on hand while ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Vistaril, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Xyzal, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine, Anaphylaxis

Allergy Relief Do's and Don'ts

Posted 5 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 5, 2017 – As the seasons change, more and more people are sneezing because of allergies. And the numbers are rising, with those in urban areas particularly affected, according to the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Symptoms in the fall are most likely caused by ragweed. Summer sneezes? Blame grass and weed pollens. Symptoms in the spring? You're probably allergic to tree pollen. Climate change is making things worse. The spring allergy season is starting earlier and lasting longer. And ragweed pollen is being produced for a longer period, too. These allergies can start at any age – often by age 10. But you can develop them as an adult, too. Your doctor can diagnose seasonal allergies based on your symptoms, a physical exam and, sometimes, allergy tests. He or she can then prescribe medication to tamp down your reaction. Here are other ways to ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Vistaril, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Flonase, Fexofenadine, Xyzal

How to Fight Fall Allergies

Posted 28 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Aug. 27, 2017 – People who suffer from allergies may start sneezing and wheezing in the fall, but there are things they can do to ease their seasonal misery. "If it feels as though your allergy symptoms flare up earlier and earlier every year, you're probably not wrong," said Dr. Stephen Tilles, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). "Climate change may actually be causing an earlier and longer fall allergy season," he added in an ACAAI news release. "In addition, windy days can mean heightened allergy symptoms, because wind can carry the pollen from ragweed, grasses and trees up to 100 miles from its source." Tilles provided the following tips to help people with seasonal allergies avoid flare-ups of their symptoms: Plan ahead. So-called "fall" allergens actually start to appear in mid-August. If you rely on allergy medication, start ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Vistaril, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Xyzal, Periactin

Health Tip: Avoid Motion Sickness

Posted 23 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Motion sickness is a common byproduct of summer travel. But with some preparation, it can be prevented. "Motion sickness occurs when the brain receives conflicting signals from the motion-sensing parts of the body: the inner ears, the eyes, and nerves in the extremities," the American Academy of Pediatrics says on its healthychildren.org website. The primary symptoms are dizziness and an upset stomach that may lead to vomiting. Here's what you can do to help prevent motion sickness, the academy says: Do not travel on an empty stomach. Eat a small snack to relieve hunger. Avoid dairy or anything heavy. Instead, opt for crackers or something light. Distract yourself by talking or listening to music. Focus on the horizon outside the car. Avoid books, iPads and other mobile devices while the car is moving. Medications such as Dramamine may ease dizziness and nausea, but they may have ... Read more

Related support groups: Nausea/Vomiting, Vomiting, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Vistaril, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Xyzal, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine, Motion Sickness

Scientists Gain Insight Into Allergies

Posted 2 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2, 2017 – Scientists report they've pinpointed which immune system cells trigger allergies. The discovery may someday lead to a blood test that improves treatment, they suggest. These cells "represent a common enemy to every allergic individual that we can now easily track," said study author Erik Wambre. He's an immunology researcher at Seattle's Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason. Allergic reactions stem from an inappropriate immune response to usually benign substances such as mold, pollen or peanuts. In the United States, almost 50 million Americans have nasal allergies, and as many as 200 die from serious food allergies a year. According to Wambre, more "biomarkers" – signs of illness that can show up in tests – are needed to improve allergy detection and assess treatment. At the moment, doctors rely on skin pricks to test your reaction to ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Vistaril, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Xyzal, Fexofenadine, Periactin

Does Your Child Really Have a Food Allergy?

Posted 24 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 24, 2017 – Many people misunderstand what food allergies are, and even doctors can be confused about how to best diagnose them, suggests a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics. It's common for people to think they have a food allergy, but the reality may be different, said Dr. Scott Sicherer, the lead author of the AAP report. "If you ask someone on the street if they have a food allergy, there's a good chance they'll say 'yes,' " said Sicherer, who heads pediatric allergy and immunology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. But a true food allergy involves an immune system reaction against a particular food, he explained. Just because you think a food upsets you, that doesn't mean it's an allergy, Sicherer said. And it's critical to distinguish an allergy from other "adverse reactions" to food, he stressed. "Some people may have an intolerance, such as ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Vistaril, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Xyzal, Periactin

Health Tip: Rid Your Bedroom of Allergens

Posted 29 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Sneezing and sniffling triggered by allergies can prevent a good night's sleep. The National Sleep Foundation suggests how to rid your bedroom of allergens: If you're allergic to pets, keep them out of the bedroom. Bathe pets weekly. Cover your mattress and pillows in dust mite covers, and wash sheets regularly in hot water. Opt for blankets made of synthetic materials, not wool. Limit mold by keeping windows open in the bathroom. Fix leaks and clean up water promptly. If you do have a moldy area, hire a professional to clean it. Skip candles, scented laundry detergent, air fresheners and other heavy fragrances in your bedroom. Clean furnace, air conditioner and vacuum filters regularly. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Nasal Congestion, Vistaril, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Flonase, Xyzal

Protect Yourself Against Reactions To Insect Stings

Posted 29 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 29, 2017 – For most of us, an insect bite means an annoying itch and some minor discomfort. But more and more people are having serious – and even potentially deadly – reactions to bites and stings, researchers report. Up to 7 percent of the adult U.S. population now appears to be allergic to insect stings. Reactions can vary from a large, long-lasting swelling just at the site of the bite to a body-wide response that can even interfere with breathing. And once you have an allergic reaction, you stand a good chance of having another one, even 10 or 20 years later. According to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI), the most serious allergic reactions come from yellow jackets, honeybees, paper wasps, hornets and fire ants. Experts suggest that if you've ever had an allergic reaction to a sting, schedule a visit with a board-certified allergist. ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Vistaril, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Claritin-D, Fexofenadine, Xyzal, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine

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