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Nearly 4 Million Worldwide Die Each Year From Asthma, COPD

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 16, 2017 – Two major chronic lung diseases – asthma and COPD – kill nearly 4 million people worldwide annually, a new report finds. The study calculates that 3.2 million people died in 2015 from COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) – a group of lung conditions that includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis, often tied to smoking. Asthma caused another 400,000 deaths, the report found. While asthma is more common, COPD is much more deadly. And while both conditions can be treated, many people remain undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. In addition, in many countries, treatment – if it exists at all – may be at insufficient levels, the research team added. "Although much of the burden [from these illnesses] is either preventable or treatable with affordable interventions, these diseases have received less attention than other prominent non-communicable diseases like ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Asthma - Maintenance, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Dyspnea, Fluticasone, Qvar, Asthma - Acute, Ribavirin, Budesonide, Flovent, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Entocort, Tobramycin, Bronchial, Mometasone, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Entocort EC

Air Purifiers May Help the Smog-Stressed Heart

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 14, 2017 – High levels of air pollution can harm heart health, but air purifiers may protect against the threat, according to a small study from China. The study included 55 healthy college students who used real or fake air purifiers in their dormitory rooms. Researchers measured the students' indoor and outdoor exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5), a component of air pollution emitted from vehicles, factories, power plants, fires and smoking. Exposure to high PM2.5 levels increased students' stress hormones and triggered metabolic changes that may increase heart disease risk, the researchers said. Using air purifiers reduced indoor levels of PM2.5 by an average 82 percent and led to short-term declines in stress hormone levels. After 24 hours of air purifier use, PM2.5 levels were within the World Health Organization's safe range, the study found. The findings ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Bronchitis, Dyspnea, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Reversible Airways Disease

Climate Change May Trigger 60,000 More Premature Deaths by 2030

Posted 31 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 31, 2017 – If nothing is done to address climate change, tens of thousands more early deaths may occur worldwide from exposure to air pollution in the coming decades, a new study contends. Increases in air pollution caused by rising temperatures will trigger an additional 60,000 premature deaths each year around the globe by 2030, and as many as 260,000 more premature deaths annually by 2100, according to the results of several different climate models. More people will die from diseases like heart attack, stroke, lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which are exacerbated by exposure to smog-laden air, said study co-author Jason West. He's an associate professor of environmental sciences and engineering with the University of North Carolina's Gillings School of Global Public Health. The projected deaths occur "under a scenario where no big policies ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Dyspnea, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Dehydration, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Heat Stress, Reversible Airways Disease

Health Tip: Worried About Lung Disease?

Posted 31 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Subtle changes in your breathing may be easy to miss, but they can be important warning signs of lung disease. The American Lung Association says symptoms to be concerned about include: A cough that persists for a month or longer, or coughing up blood. Feeling short of breath, or having difficulty breathing. Persistent production of mucus that lasts for a month or longer. Wheezing. Chest pain that occurs for unknown reasons – particularly when you cough or inhale – that lasts for at least a month. Read more

Related support groups: Asthma, Bronchitis, Angina, Dyspnea, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease

Rush Hour Pollution May Be Worse Than Thought

Posted 28 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 28, 2017 – Ever wonder what you're inhaling as you idle in rush-hour traffic? New research finds air pollution levels in cars are much higher than previously believed. "We found that people are likely getting a double whammy of exposure in terms of health during rush-hour commutes," said Michael Bergin, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Duke University, in Durham, N.C. He and his colleagues installed sensors inside about 30 cars going to and from downtown Atlanta. Over the 60 commutes, they found that levels of some types of harmful particulate air pollution in the cars were twice as high as levels detected by widely used roadside sensors. "If these chemicals are as bad for people as many researchers believe, then commuters should seriously be rethinking their driving habits," Bergin added in a university news release. The contaminated air particles can ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Dyspnea, Sore Throat, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease

Health Tip: Learn Your Risk for Asthma

Posted 27 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Asthma can begin at any age, but it usually starts in childhood. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute says risk factors for developing asthma include: Having frequent respiratory infections and wheezing. Having a parent with asthma. Having allergies. Having eczema. Being a boy or an adult woman. Working in an environment with dust and chemicals. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Eczema, Asthma - Acute, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease

Health Tip: When Air Quality is Poor

Posted 10 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Poor air quality is a serious issue for people with breathing problems, such as asthma. When air quality is poor, the National Weather Service suggests: If you're exercising outdoors, make your routine less strenuous than usual Take more frequent breaks. And shorten the length of your workout. Move planned outdoor activities to another day or indoors. If that's not possible, schedule activities in the morning, when air quality generally is better. Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Asthma - Maintenance, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Dyspnea, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease, Bronchospastic Disease

Seniors' Lungs Can Tackle Exercise

Posted 8 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 7, 2017 If seniors want to start a vigorous exercise program, there's a good chance their lungs can keep up with the extra demand, a new study finds. Researchers assessed younger and older adults to determine their lungs' capacity to exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide (lung-diffusing capacity) during physical activity. This exchange between the lungs and blood delivers oxygen throughout the body, but typically decreases with age. The study included four groups. One was young adults with an average age of 27. They had normal fitness levels. The second group was highly fit adults. Their average age was also 27. A third group was made of older adults. Their average age was 69 and they had normal fitness levels. The final group was highly fit older adults. Their average age was 65. The study volunteers did increasingly difficult workouts on a stationary bicycle. As the study ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Respiratory Tract Disease, Reversible Airways Disease

Could a Sweet Tooth in Pregnancy Spur Allergies in Kids?

Posted 6 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 – Bingeing on chocolate, pastries and soda during pregnancy might have an unintended downside – setting kids up for asthma and allergies, new research suggests. The study of more than 9,000 mother-child pairs in Britain can't prove cause-and-effect. However, the researchers found that children born to the 20 percent of mothers with the highest sugar intake during pregnancy were 38 percent more likely to have an allergy by the age of 7, and 73 percent more likely to have two or more allergies. The children were assessed at age 7 for common allergies such as dust mites, cat and grass. Compared to children born to women in the lowest category of sugar intake, these kids also had double the odds for allergic asthma, the researchers found. The British team stressed that the association remained even after they factored out the kids' own daily sugar intake. "We cannot ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Asthma - Acute, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease

For Many, Friends Are Key to Happiness in Old Age

Posted 29 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 29, 2017 – As you age, the friends you keep wield an ever-greater impact on your health and sense of happiness, new research reveals. They may even outstrip family in terms of the sway they have over you, according to the pair of new studies. Lead investigator William Chopik cited several reasons why friendships might pack a bigger punch than blood relationships when it comes to influencing health and well-being. "We spend leisure time with friends. We freely choose to continue relationships with friends," said Chopik, an assistant professor of psychology at Michigan State University. If the friendships last until older adulthood, "clearly these are good friendships," he added. "As we age, we prune away at some of the friendships that are more superficial and acquaintance-like," he said. That means that as older adults, "we're left with the ones that are deeper and make ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Cancer, Cough, Major Depressive Disorder, Osteoarthritis, Hypertension, Ischemic Stroke, High Cholesterol, Bronchitis, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Transient Ischemic Attack, Dysthymia, Pre-Diabetes, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Bronchiectasis, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis

Even at Low Levels, Dirty Air Raises Death Risk for U.S. Seniors

Posted 28 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 28, 2017 – Air pollution may shorten the lives of American seniors, even in areas where levels fall below national safety standards, new research indicates. Although it's possible that factors other than air pollution are responsible for the increase in premature deaths among older adults, study co-author Francesca Dominici said the findings are "bulletproof evidence of increased risk of deaths due to polluted air in the U.S. "Make no mistake. We need to strengthen, not weaken, [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency] air pollution standards," said Dominici, a professor of biostatistics at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston. "We need to increase, not reduce, the EPA research funding." The investigators launched their research to determine whether pollution levels considered to be acceptable might still be hazardous to human health. "There is extensive ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Dyspnea, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Reversible Airways Disease, Bronchospastic Disease

Climate Change May Up Asthma Irritant, Study Says

Posted 8 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 8, 2017 – Climate change may increase people's exposure to an outdoor fungus that can damage airway cells, leading to a rise in asthma and allergy symptoms, a new study contends. The widespread fungus, called Alternaria alternata, produces spores in the dry, warm weather of late summer and early fall, said the researchers from the University of Minnesota and the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Previous research has shown that the fungus produces up to three times more spores when atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels are high. Rising CO2 emissions are thought to contribute to climate change. In some people, exposure to the spores can trigger allergy symptoms and asthma, the researchers explained. For this study, the research team exposed cells from the linings of human airways to Alternaria and found it produced more cell damage. They warned that climate change might ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Asthma, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Xyzal

Replace Coal With Solar Power to Save Money, Lives

Posted 6 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 6, 2017 – Replacing coal with solar power would save American lives and money, according to a new study. "If we're rational and we care about American lives – or even just money – then it's time to end coal in the U.S.," said study co-author Joshua Pearce. He is an associate professor of materials science and electrical engineering at Michigan Technological University. Tens of thousands of Americans die early due to health issues linked to air pollution. Michigan Tech researchers calculated the human toll of burning coal along with the possible benefits of switching to solar power. They analyzed regional electric costs and calculated the number of U.S. deaths per kilowatt hour each year for coal as well as solar power. They also estimated the potential return on investment of solar installations using U.S. Department of Energy data. The study found that if the United ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Fluticasone, Qvar, Ribavirin, Budesonide, Flovent, Entocort, Tobramycin, Bronchial, Mometasone, Entocort EC, Acetylcysteine, Mucomyst, Bronchiectasis, Beclomethasone, Pulmicort Flexhaler, Alvesco

Does Dirty Air Keep You Awake?

Posted 22 May 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 22, 2017 – Air pollution may harm your sleep, researchers say. "Prior studies have shown that air pollution impacts heart health and affects breathing and lung function, but less is known about whether air pollution affects sleep," said lead author Dr. Martha Billings. "We thought an effect was likely, given that air pollution causes upper airway irritation, swelling and congestion, and may also affect the central nervous system and brain areas that control breathing patterns and sleep," added Billings, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Washington. She and her colleagues looked at more than 1,800 people, average age 68, in six U.S. cities. They wanted to see if the two most common air pollutants – traffic-related pollutant gas (NO2) and fine-particle pollution – affected sleep efficiency. Sleep efficiency is a measure of the percentage of time in bed ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Cough, Fatigue, Bronchitis, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Reversible Airways Disease

Could Cancer Drug Gleevec Help With Severe Asthma?

Posted 19 May 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 19, 2017 – A leukemia drug might also effectively treat severe asthma, a small-scale clinical trial suggests. Gleevec (imatinib) reduced the "twitchiness" of airways, making them less likely to reflexively constrict when exposed to an allergen or asthma trigger, said senior researcher Dr. Elliot Israel. "We showed we could decrease the amount of airway twitchiness by a third," Israel said. "That's a substantial change, and that was significant compared with the placebo group." Israel is director of the respiratory therapy department at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. The drug also improved overall airway function, an effect researchers hadn't expected, Israel said. People whose severe asthma isn't controlled despite use of high-dose steroid medications are at risk of declining lung function and poor quality of life, the researchers said in background notes. But, ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Asthma, Gleevec, Asthma - Acute, Anaphylaxis, Imatinib, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease

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