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Respiratory Tract Disease News

Teens Acting Badly? Smog Could Be to Blame

Posted 1 day 6 hours ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 13, 2017 – Teens are more likely to behave badly – lie, steal, vandalize, use drugs – if they live in areas with heavy air pollution, a study of children living in greater Los Angeles suggests. Younger kids exposed to increased levels of air pollution tended to have delinquency scores similar to teens three or four years older, the study authors said, though the study did not prove that pollution actually caused delinquent behavior. Regardless, the researchers estimated a 22 percent increase in delinquency among Southern California teenagers for every 4.5 microgram per cubic meter increase in the airborne particulate matter to which they're exposed. To put that in perspective, the federal government says clean air should contain no more than 12 micrograms per cubic meter of particulate matter, each speck of which is 30 times smaller than a strand of hair. ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety and Stress, Respiratory Tract Disease

Protecting Your Health From Wildfire Smoke

Posted 2 days 3 hours ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 12, 2017 – Fire and smoke from the wildfires raging in Southern California aren't just destroying homes and lives, they're a serious health risk, as well. The smoke can irritate the eyes, nose, throat and lungs and can cause coughing, wheezing or breathing problems, according to the American Thoracic Society. The smoke can be especially dangerous to those with lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis, the organization said. It's also harmful to people with heart disease, pregnant women, seniors and children. People in those high-risk groups should ask their doctor about specific precautions, the society advised. For the general population, suggested actions to gain protections from the wildfire smoke include: Limiting physical activity. Staying indoors with the windows and doors closed. Reduce other sources of ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Smoking, Bronchitis, Smoking Cessation, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease

Smoggy Streets May Make Daily Walk a Health Hazard

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 6, 2017 – It's common doctors' advice to the elderly: Walk around the block each day to help stay fit. Trouble is, that advice might do more harm than good if you live in a neighborhood with smoggy air, a new study shows. British research suggests the unhealthy effects of breathing dirty air might outweigh whatever benefit the daily walk brings. "For many people, such as the elderly or those with chronic disease, the only exercise they very often can do is to walk," noted lead researcher Dr. Kian Fan Chung, of the National Heart and Lung Institute at Imperial College London. But "our study suggests that we might advise these people to walk in green spaces, away from built-up areas and pollution from traffic," Chung said in a news release from Duke University. "But for those living in inner cities, this may be difficult to do, and there may be a cost associated with it ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Respiratory Tract Disease

Breathing Trouble May Follow Preemies to Adulthood

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 1, 2017 – People who were born prematurely may have smaller-than-normal airways in adulthood, which can cause respiratory problems, researchers say. Premature birth is associated with poorer heart and lung function, but the reasons why have not been fully understood. In a new study, investigators compared adults who were born eight weeks or more early with people who were born at full-term. Both groups were the same age and height. The researchers used lung function tests to calculate the airway size of each study participant, and concluded that airway size in the premature group was smaller than in the full-term group. "Our study might suggest that respiratory treatments would be less effective in individuals born prematurely, but more work needs to be done to directly test this," said study author Joseph Duke. He's an assistant professor at Northern Arizona University. ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Respiratory Tract Disease, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Apnea of Prematurity

Can Trees Curb Asthma Flare-Ups in Polluted Cities?

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 27, 2017 – Urban air pollution can trigger asthma. But lots of trees in cities might lower the odds of a flare-up, a new British study finds. "We wanted to clarify how urban vegetation may be related to respiratory health," said study leader Ian Alcock of the University of Exeter Medical School. "We know that trees remove the air pollutants which can bring on asthma attacks, but in some situations they can also cause localized buildups of particulates by preventing their dispersion by wind. And vegetation can also produce allergenic pollen which exacerbates asthma," added Alcock, a research fellow. His team analyzed data on more than 650,000 asthma-related hospitalizations that occurred among urban residents in England over 15 years. In neighborhoods with the highest levels of air pollution, an extra 300 trees per square kilometer (0.4 square mile) was associated with ... Read more

Related support groups: Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Asthma - Acute, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease

Health Tip: Prevent Respiratory Infections

Posted 24 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Our lungs have a natural defense system that protects them from dirt and germs. But that isn't enough to prevent all cases of lung disease. The American Lung Association says here's what you can do to keep your lungs healthier: Don't smoke. If you do, quit. Avoid air pollution. On smoggy days, stay inside. Wash your hands often with soap and water. An alcohol-based sanitizer may be used in a pinch. Practice good oral hygiene. Brush your teeth at least twice daily and see your dentist at least every six months. Get the annual flu shot, and ask you doctor about whether the pneumoniavaccine is right for you. If you get sick, stay home from work or school until you're feeling better. Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Respiratory Tract Disease, Reversible Airways Disease

Health Tip: If There's a Wildfire Nearby

Posted 16 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Smoke from a nearby wildfire threatens anyone, but poses even more of a threat to people with asthma, COPD, heart disease or diabetes, the American Lung Association says. The group suggests what to do if a wildfire burns near you: Stay inside, if possible. Do not rely on a dust mask to keep your lungs safe. Most dust masks allow fine particles to filter through. More advanced masks include a filter, but it may not be 100 percent effective. Protect your children, whose lungs are still developing and are more at risk for long-term damage. Keep windows up while driving. Put home air conditioning on recirculate to keep outside air from coming in. Do not exercise outside. Be ready to evacuate if given an order. Read more

Related support groups: Asthma, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease

Your Blood Type May Determine How Smog Affects Your Heart

Posted 14 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 14, 2017 – People with certain blood types are at increased risk for a heart attack from high levels of air pollution, a new study finds. Specifically, people with coronary artery disease who have A, B or AB blood types are more likely than those with the O blood type to have a heart attack when exposed to high levels of small particulate PM2.5 air pollution. That is described by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as inhalable particles with a diameter of 2.5 micrometers or smaller. Most people won't have a heart attack unless they have coronary artery disease. And even then it's not inevitable, the researchers said in a news release from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City. "You have to have other characteristics for coronary disease to progress to a heart attack," lead investigator Benjamin Horne, a clinical epidemiologist at the ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Respiratory Tract Disease

Health Tip: Understanding COPD

Posted 10 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third-leading cause of death in the United States, affecting some 16 million Americans and potentially millions more who don't know they have it. According to the National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute, COPD can make it difficult for people to breathe and harm their quality of life. In COPD, less air flows in and out of the lung's airways due to one or more of these factors: The airways lose their elastic quality. The walls between some of the air sacs are destroyed. The walls of the airways become thick and inflamed. The airways make more mucus than usual and become clogged. Read more

Related support groups: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Bronchiectasis, Alpha-1 Proteinase Inhibitor Deficiency, Respiratory Tract Disease

'Old' Lungs May Be Good Transplant Options

Posted 9 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 9, 2017 – Lungs from older donors are a viable option for lung transplants and should be considered more often, a new study suggests. Survival rates for younger recipients of lung transplants from donors older than 60 are similar to those who receive lungs from younger donors, researchers found. The University of Louisville team analyzed more than 14,000 lung transplants received by people 18 and older in the United States between 2005 and 2014. About 26 percent of the recipients were 50 or younger, with 2 percent having received lungs from donors older than 60. Among those transplant recipients, five-year survival rates were similar between people who received older donor lungs and those who received younger donor lungs, the findings showed. Further analysis revealed that younger patients who received older donor lungs had much better outcomes when they'd had a double ... Read more

Related support groups: Organ Transplant - Rejection Prophylaxis, Organ Transplant, Organ Transplant - Rejection Reversal, Respiratory Tract Disease, Diagnosis and Investigation, Rejection Reversal, Rejection Prophylaxis

HPV Vaccine Linked to Drop in Cases of Rare Childhood Disease

Posted 9 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 9, 2017 – The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, first developed to help guard against cervical cancer, also seems to protect against a rare, chronic childhood respiratory disease, a new study suggests. It's believed that the disease – recurrent respiratory papillomatosis – occurs in children when HPV type 6 or 11 spreads from mother to child around the time of birth. Some children develop wart-like, noncancerous growths in the respiratory tract, making it difficult to breathe. The condition can be life-threatening, and repeated surgeries are usually required to keep the airway clear. In the United States, about 800 children develop recurrent respiratory papillomatosis each year. This results in annual medical costs of $123 million, according to a news release from the Journal of Infectious Diseases, which published the study on Nov. 9. For the study, researchers ... Read more

Related support groups: Human Papilloma Virus, Condylomata Acuminata, Gardasil, Viral Infection, Respiratory Tract Disease, Cervical Dysplasia, Human Papillomavirus Vaccine, Cervarix, Human Papillomavirus Prophylaxis, Vaccination and Prophlaxis, Gardasil 9

Pollution Tied to 9 Million Deaths Worldwide in 2015

Posted 20 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 20, 2017 – Pollution led to more than 9 million deaths worldwide in 2015, or 1 in 6 deaths that year, a new report reveals. Air pollution, the worst culprit, was linked to 6.5 million heart- and lung-related deaths, The Lancet Commission on Pollution and Health said. Water pollution was tied to 1.8 million deaths, mostly from gastrointestinal and parasitic infections. And workplace-related pollution and lead pollution also played a role, contributing to 800,000 deaths and 500,000 deaths, respectively. "Pollution is much more than an environmental challenge – it is a profound and pervasive threat that affects many aspects of human health and well-being," said Dr. Philip Landrigan, co-lead of the commission. "It deserves the full attention of international leaders, civil society, health professionals, and people around the world," added Landrigan, a professor at the Icahn ... Read more

Related support groups: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Bronchitis, Lung Cancer, Fluticasone, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Qvar, Ribavirin, Budesonide, Flovent, Entocort, Tobramycin, Mometasone, Entocort EC, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Bronchiectasis, Beclomethasone

Switch From Smoking to Vaping Could Save Over 6 Million U.S. Lives

Posted 3 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 2, 2017 – Millions of cigarette smokers could live substantially longer if electronic cigarettes are embraced as a replacement for tobacco during the next decade, a new study contends. As many as 6.6 million cigarette smokers could live a combined 86.7 million more years under policies that encourage them to swap their smokes for e-cigarettes, according to "optimistic" projections from cancer researchers at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. Even a worst-case scenario involving e-cigarettes would still save lives, the researchers said. Under a "pessimistic" projection, 1.6 million former cigarette smokers would have a combined 20.8 million more years of additional life, the research team found. These numbers show that adopting e-cigarettes as an alternative to smoking could prove the easiest way to cause tobacco use to dwindle in the United States, said lead ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Nicotine, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Nicorette, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Nicoderm CQ, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Nicotrol Inhaler, Commit, Respiratory Tract Disease, Habitrol, Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Nicotrol TD, Nicorelief, Nicorette DS

After Deepwater Oil Cleanup in Gulf, Ill Effects Persist

Posted 2 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 2, 2017 – Workers exposed to dispersants while cleaning up a major oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico developed health symptoms, including wheeze and eye irritation, a new study says. Dispersants are chemicals used to break up oil slicks into smaller patches that can be degraded naturally or diluted by large volumes of water. U.S. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences researchers are conducting a long-term follow-up study of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. They found that cleanup workers exposed to dispersants were more likely to experience symptoms such as cough, wheeze, tightness in the chest, and burning in the eyes, nose, throat or lungs than those who weren't exposed to dispersants. Lead author Dale Sandler said the scientists were able to distinguish between health effects related to dispersants and those related to petroleum products in the spill. ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Eye Conditions, Respiratory Tract Disease, Visual Defect/Disturbance

Respiratory Disease Death Rates Have Soared

Posted 29 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 29, 2017 – The number of Americans who die from chronic respiratory diseases has skyrocketed over the past 35 years, led in large part by deaths from COPD, a new report indicates. From 1980 through 2014, more than 4.6 million Americans died from a range of chronic respiratory illnesses, the researchers reported. While the risk was pegged at 41 deaths for every 100,000 people back in 1980, it rose to nearly 53 out of every 100,000 by 2014, representing a nearly 31 percent spike over 35 years. And the dismal news continued in the new report. Eighty-five percent of the deaths – 3.9 million people – were from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which moved up in that period of time to become the third leading cause of death, ahead of stroke, in the United States. Other chronic respiratory illnesses that saw dramatic increases included: particle-inhalation ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Pneumonia, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Fluticasone, Qvar, Ribavirin, Budesonide, Flovent, Entocort, Tobramycin, Entocort EC, Mometasone, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Bronchiectasis, Beclomethasone, Uceris, Pulmicort Flexhaler, Asmanex Twisthaler, Alvesco

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Asthma, Cough, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Nasal Congestion, Bronchitis, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Rhinitis, Bronchospasm Prophylaxis, Bronchiectasis, view more... Aspiration Pneumonia, Pulmonary Fibrosis, Hiccups, Dyspnea, Respiratory Failure, Pleural Effusion, Pulmonary Impairment, Pulmonary Heart or Vascular Disease, Mucous Plugging in Lung Disease, Vocal Cord Dysfunction, Hypereosinophilic Syndrome, Croup, Mechanical Ventilation, Lymphangioleiomyomatosis, Pleuropulmonary Infection, Berylliosis, Bronchospastic Disease, Respiratory Depression, Bronchopleural Fistula