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Respiratory Tract Disease News

Common Viruses a Deadly Threat at Nursing Homes

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 13, 2017 – Common viruses pose a serious threat in nursing homes, often sabotaging standard infection control measures, a new case study suggests. "Long-term care facilities have unique challenges. Infection-control policies from acute care hospitals cannot simply be mirrored in this setting and expected to work," said study lead author Dr. Schaefer Spires. His report details a 16-day outbreak of two viruses – respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) – that swept through a long-term dementia ward in Tennessee. Nearly three-quarters of the patients became sick and five died. "RSV and HMPV are viruses that need to be taken as seriously as we take the flu, especially in older adults," said Spires, an assistant professor of infectious diseases at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville. RSV causes infections of the lungs and ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Cough, Dementia, Cold Symptoms, Alzheimer's Disease, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Sore Throat, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Viral Infection, Respiratory Tract Disease, Respiratory Syncytial Virus

How to Spot a Common, Potentially Dangerous, Childhood Illness

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 – Nearly all children get respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) by age 2. But just because the infection is common doesn't mean it should be taken lightly, one nursing specialist warns. Symptoms of this lung and respiratory infection – coughing, sneezing and a runny nose – are often mistaken for a cold, according to Alison Pittman, clinical assistant professor at Texas A&M College of Nursing. "Most healthy children will experience cold-like symptoms, but it can easily spread to babies with pre-existing conditions," and put them at risk for serious health problems, she said in a college news release. Those at greatest risk for a severe infection include premature babies, children born with heart or lung problems, and people of any age who have weakened immune systems. Most babies with RSV develop a cough, runny nose and other cold-like symptoms for one to two ... Read more

Related support groups: Influenza, Cold Symptoms, Dyspnea, Sore Throat, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Vaccination and Prophlaxis

Ebola Can Linger in Lungs, Study Finds

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 5, 2017 – Researchers say they've discovered signs that the Ebola virus could lurk in the lungs and reproduce in a recovering patient, a finding that could lead to better understanding of the deadly disease. At issue: Does the Ebola virus cause lung damage by infecting the lungs and spreading in them? Researchers have suspected this, but weren't sure that the virus infects the lung. Dr. Giuseppe Ippolito and colleagues at the National Institute for Infectious Diseases in Rome monitored the lungs and blood of one patient with Ebola infection. The investigators found signs that the virus lingered in the lungs for almost a week after it was no longer found in the patient's blood and that it also may have reproduced. "This suggests a major role of the respiratory tissues in the pathogenesis of Ebola virus disease," the study authors wrote, referring to the way the virus ... Read more

Related support groups: Respiratory Tract Disease, Diagnosis and Investigation, Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever

Lung-Sparing Surgery May Boost Mesothelioma Survival

Posted 23 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 23, 2016 – Surgery that preserves the lung, when combined with other therapies, appears to extend the lives of people with a subtype of the rare and deadly cancer mesothelioma, a new study suggests. Tracking 73 patients with advanced malignant pleural mesothelioma – which affects the lungs' protective lining in the chest cavity – researchers found that those treated with lung-sparing surgery had an average survival of nearly three years. A subset of those patients survived longer than seven years. Mesothelioma patients treated with chemotherapy alone, which is standard care, live an average of 12 to 18 months, the researchers said. Study participants received lung-sparing surgeries and another treatment called photodynamic therapy that uses light to kill cancer cells. Ninety-two percent of the group also received chemotherapy. The study volunteers achieved far longer ... Read more

Related support groups: Respiratory Tract Disease, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

CDC Reveals Top 5 Causes of Death

Posted 18 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 – Heart disease tops the list of what's most likely to kill you or someone you love, U.S. health officials reported Thursday. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released data naming the five leading causes of death among Americans under age 80 for 2014. After heart disease, cancer was the most likely cause of death. Rounding out the list were stroke; chronic lower respiratory diseases, such as asthma, bronchitis and emphysema; and accidents, the report said. Nearly two-thirds of deaths in the United States were caused by these five diseases or conditions. And many of these deaths were preventable. Thirty percent of heart disease deaths, 15 percent of cancer deaths, 28 percent of stroke deaths, 36 percent of chronic lower respiratory disease deaths, and 43 percent of accident deaths were preventable, the CDC researchers said. The good news in ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Heart Disease, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Breast Cancer, Heart Attack, Bronchitis, Pneumonia, Lung Cancer, Myocardial Infarction, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

How to Exercise Safely in Smog

Posted 11 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 – Scientists say they have figured out the ideal speeds for cyclists and pedestrians to move in order to limit their inhalation of air pollution and still get the full benefits of exercise. "The faster you move, the harder you breathe and the more pollution you could potentially inhale, but you also are exposed to traffic for a shorter period of time. This analysis shows where the sweet spot is," study author Alex Bigazzi, a transportation expert at the University of British Columbia, said in a school news release. The researchers used a computer model of 10,000 people. The investigators found that cyclists should ride between 7.5 to 12.4 miles per hour on city roads. And, pedestrians should walk between 1.2 and 3.7 miles per hour. There are different recommended speeds depending on gender, age and road grades. For example, on flat roads the ideal speeds are: 7.8 ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Cough, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Weight Loss, Bronchitis, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Dyspnea, Sore Throat, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Bronchiectasis, Bronchospasm Prophylaxis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Bronchospastic Disease, Reversible Airways Disease

Downside to Exercise for City Kids: More Pollution

Posted 3 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2, 2016 – Exercise is usually great for children, but a new study finds that city kids who get regular exercise may breathe in more of an airborne toxin as a result. "This study's findings clearly add to evidence that physical activity may benefit the respiratory health of children, but exposure to high levels of black carbon may lessen this effect," said study researcher Dr. Rachel Miller. She's a professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health in New York City. The research included 129 children from New York City. They were between ages 9 and 14. The kids wore wrist monitors to measure their physical activity levels over six days. Nearly 60 percent of them did 60 minutes or more of moderate to vigorous exercise a day. Compared to the less active children, the active youngsters were exposed to 25 percent more black ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Cough, Asthma, Weight Loss, Dyspnea, Respiratory Tract Disease

Scented Rooms, Products? Many Health-Conscious Americans Say 'No Thanks'

Posted 2 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2, 2016 – Lavender, lemon or lilac: Whatever the artificial aroma, more Americans are avoiding scented spaces and products, a new survey shows. Fragranced products such as soaps, candles and air fresheners cause more than one-third of U.S. adults to suffer ill health effects, including headaches, dizziness and breathing difficulties, researchers said. Surveying a nationally representative group of more than 1,100 Americans, the research team also found that more than 20 percent of people quickly leave a business place if they smell air fresheners or other scented products. Led by Anne Steinemann, a professor of civil engineering at the University of Melbourne in Australia, the research is believed to be the first to examine many aspects of exposure to fragranced products and their effects in the United States. "What I found was that half the reports of adverse health ... Read more

Related support groups: Headache, Migraine, Cough, Asthma, Sinusitis, Migraine Prevention, Asthma - Maintenance, Cold Symptoms, Cluster Headaches, Dyspnea, Migraine Prophylaxis, Asthma - Acute, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Rhinitis, New Daily Persistent Headache, Sinus Symptoms, Respiratory Tract Disease, Allergic Asthma, Minor Skin Conditions

Dental Cleanings May Help Keep Lungs Clean, Too

Posted 27 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 – Regular dental checkups not only keep your smile bright, they may also keep your lungs healthy. A new study suggests that regular dental cleanings could lower your risk of pneumonia by reducing levels of bacteria that cause the lung infection. Each year, nearly 1 million Americans develop pneumonia, the researchers said, and 50,000 die from the disease. Anyone can get pneumonia, but it is more common among older people and those with lung disease and conditions such as AIDS. In this study, researchers reviewed the records of more than 26,000 people. The study found that people who never saw a dentist were 86 percent more likely to get bacterial pneumonia compared to people who got dental checkups twice a year. The results were to be presented Thursday at IDWeek. IDWeek is the annual meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the Society for ... Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Pneumonia, Toothache, Gingivitis, Dental Abscess, Periodontitis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Stomatitis, Prevention of Dental Caries, Dental Antibiotic Prophylaxis

Air Pollution May Even Harm Blood Vessels of Healthy Young

Posted 25 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 – Even young, healthy adults can suffer blood vessel damage from air pollution, a new study finds. Periodic exposure to fine particulate matter – tiny pollutants from cars, factories, power plants and fires – isn't a health risk only for the ill and the elderly, the researchers concluded. The three-year study in Provo, Utah, tied this form of air pollution to abnormal changes in the blood of young adults, age 23 on average. Over time, these abnormalities could lead to heart disease, the researchers said. The findings suggest that living in a polluted environment could promote development of high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke more pervasively and at an earlier stage than previously thought, said study researcher Timothy O'Toole. He's with the Diabetes and Obesity Center at the University of Louisville in Kentucky. "Although we have known for some time ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Cough, Hypertension, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Transient Ischemic Attack, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Respiratory Tract Disease

How to Guard Against Deadly Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Posted 13 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 – You can't smell it or see it, but carbon monoxide can be deadly, according to the National Fire Protection Association. Anything that burns gasoline, wood, coal, oil and propane – including home heating and cooking equipment – can be a source of this dangerous gas, the fire association explains. That's why it's important to have your heating system professionally serviced once a year, along with any other appliances such as water heaters or stoves that burn these fuels. To protect your family, install carbon monoxide detectors outside every sleeping area and on every floor of your home, the fire association advises. Multiple detectors can be connected; if one picks up carbon monoxide, all of the alarms will sound. The NFPA also provides these tips: Make sure the detector you buy has a label indicating it was tested in a reputable laboratory. Follow ... Read more

Related support groups: Poisoning, Charcoal, Respiratory Tract Disease, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Activated Charcoal, Charcocaps, Charcoal Plus DS, Actidose-Aqua, Flatulex, Carbomix, Insta-Char with Sorbitol, Charcotabs, Char-Flo with Sorbitol, Liqui-Char, Actidose Plus Sorbitol, Eucarbon, Charcoal/Simethicone, Charcoaid 2000, Medicoal, Actidose-Aqua Advance

Smart City Planning Can Cut Deadly Diseases, Improve Air Quality

Posted 25 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 23, 2016 – Cities that promote walking, bicycling and public transportation can expect a drop in chronic illnesses such as heart disease and diabetes, a new study suggests. The finding stems from an international study led by the University of Melbourne in Australia and the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). The goal: To see how city design – including street layout and access to shopping within walking distance – affects the environment and health in places like Boston; Copenhagen; Delhi, India; London and Sao Paulo, Brazil. Team members reported their findings Friday during a meeting at the U.N. General Assembly. The findings were also reported in the latest issue of The Lancet. "With the world's population estimated to reach 10 billion people by 2050, and three quarters of this population living in cities, city planning must be part of a comprehensive ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Cough, Asthma, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease

As Traffic Piles Up, So Does Air Pollution

Posted 12 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 12, 2016 – Stuck in traffic? Shut your car windows and turn your ventilation system to re-circulate air, researchers advise. Doing so can reduce your exposure to toxic air pollution from a traffic jam by up to 76 percent, a new study suggests. "Where possible and with weather conditions allowing, it is one of the best ways to limit your exposure by keeping windows shut, fans turned off and to try and increase the distance between you and the car in front while in traffic jams or stationary at traffic lights," said study senior author Prashant Kumar. "If the fan or heater needs to be on, the best setting would be to have the air re-circulating within the car without drawing in air from outdoors," Kumar, who's with the University of Surrey in England, said in a university news release. The investigators also found that pedestrians are exposed to high levels of vehicle air ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Dyspnea, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup

Hillary Clinton's Pneumonia: How Serious, the Prognosis

Posted 12 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 12, 2016 – Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's pneumonia may have heightened questions about her overall health, but doctors say pneumonia is common and, in her case, may not be very serious. "Pneumonia is an infection [of the lung] that requires rest, recuperation and aggressive treatment," said Dr. Marc Siegel, a clinical professor of medicine at the New York University School of Medicine in New York City. It's not something to be taken lightly, Siegel said, but added, "In most cases the prognosis is good." For Clinton, who is 68, her pneumonia began as a persistent cough, according to her personal physician, Dr. Lisa Bardack. Clinton had been suffering from a prolonged cough related to allergies, Bardack said in a statement released Sunday. On Friday, she was diagnosed with pneumonia and started taking antibiotics and was advised to rest and ease up her ... Read more

Related support groups: Pneumonia, Cold Symptoms, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Respiratory Tract Disease

Will Worsening 'Smoke Waves' Threaten Western U.S.?

Posted 9 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 9, 2016 – Climate change, and the warmer summers it will bring, could blanket much of the western United States with persistent "smoke waves" – consecutive days of air pollution from wildfires, a new study warns. "More people in the western U.S. are likely to experience high-pollution episodes from wildfires, and the pollution episodes are likely to be more frequent, last longer and be more intense," said study author Jia Coco Liu. She was a graduate student at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies when the study was conducted. Northern California, western Oregon and the Great Plains will bear the brunt of the pollution, the researchers said. Wildfires occur frequently in the vast, dry West. The smoke they produce can spread far beyond the burning landscape, and the full impact on human health is still unclear. "The smoke has been long recognized as being ... Read more

Related support groups: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Bronchitis, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease

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Bronchitis, Asthma, Cough, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Nasal Congestion, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Rhinitis, Bronchospasm Prophylaxis, Bronchiectasis, view more... Aspiration Pneumonia, Hiccups, Pulmonary Fibrosis, Dyspnea, Pleural Effusion, Respiratory Failure, Pulmonary Impairment, Pulmonary Heart or Vascular Disease, Mucous Plugging in Lung Disease, Croup, Hypereosinophilic Syndrome, Mechanical Ventilation, Lymphangioleiomyomatosis, Pleuropulmonary Infection, Berylliosis, Bronchospastic Disease, Respiratory Depression