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Related terms: Acute Kidney Failure, Acute Renal Failure, Chronic Renal Failure, Kidney Failure, CRF

Kidney Disease May Boost Risk of Abnormal Heartbeat

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 10, 2017 – People with failing kidneys are at increased risk of developing a life-threatening abnormal heart rhythm, a new report suggests. Chronic kidney disease can as much as double a patient's risk of atrial fibrillation, a quivering or irregular heartbeat that can lead to stroke or heart failure, said lead researcher Dr. Nisha Bansal. She is an associate professor of nephrology at the University of Washington's Kidney Research Institute, in Seattle. The risk of atrial fibrillation increases as kidney function declines, Bansal said. "We saw the worse your kidney function, the greater your risk of developing atrial fibrillation. Even mild changes in kidney function were strongly linked to atrial fibrillation," Bansal noted. The study included data gathered from three separate research projects focused on heart health in the United States. The three projects created a ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Renal Failure, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Chronic Kidney Disease, Peritoneal dialysis, Renal Osteodystrophy, Hyperphosphatemia of Renal Failure

Asthma Drug May Help Kidney Patients Regain Sense of Smell

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 3, 2017 – A common problem among chronic kidney disease patients is a loss of the sense of smell, which could lead to an inadequate diet, researchers say. In turn, malnutrition in these patients can result in poor quality of life, poor overall health and even early death. But a new study found that using an inhaled asthma drug might improve the sense of smell in kidney failure patients. "Our ultimate goal is to have an intervention that can alleviate smell loss, and thus to improve the kidney patients' nutritional status," study co-leader Dr. Sagar Nigwekar said in a news release from the American Society of Nephrology. The study included 36 patients with chronic kidney disease, 100 with kidney failure and 25 with normal kidney function. Average scores on odor identification tests were about 76 percent among the kidney disease patients, 67 percent for those with kidney ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Hyperphosphatemia of Renal Failure, Theolair

Novel Procedure Improves Kidney Transplant Success

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2, 2017 – A new treatment might open the door for more patients with advanced kidney disease to get a transplant, a preliminary study suggests. Of the 100,000-plus Americans waiting for a donor kidney, about one-third are "sensitized," said Dr. Robert Montgomery, director of the Transplant Institute at NYU Langone in New York City. Those patients face a tough situation: They harbor immune system antibodies that are primed to attack a donor organ. The antibodies can form when a person is exposed to foreign tissue, Montgomery explained. So a patient who's had a prior kidney transplant may be highly sensitized – meaning they have a large number of the offending antibodies. It can also happen to patients who've had blood transfusion or ever been pregnant, Montgomery said. It's almost impossible to find a compatible donor for those patients. But they might be able to ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Renal Failure, Rituxan, Rituximab, Chronic Kidney Disease, Organ Transplant - Rejection Prophylaxis, Hyqvia, Rejection Prophylaxis, Rituxan Hycela, Hyaluronidase/immune Globulin, Hyaluronidase/rituximab

Drug for Kidney Disease Tied to Infection Risk

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 1, 2017 – A drug used for some cases of kidney disease can raise the risk of serious infections, researchers say. A clinical trial was stopped early when researchers discovered that patients on the drug – a corticosteroid called methylprednisolone – suffered a concerning number of serious side effects. Most often, that meant severe infections, including pneumonia and meningitis. Overall, nearly 15 percent of patients on the drug had a serious "adverse event" over two years, the investigators found. That compared with 3 percent of patients given placebo pills, the researchers reported. The study focused on patients with a form of kidney disease called immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy. It arises when IgA – an immune system protein – builds up in the kidneys, leading to inflammation. Methylprednisolone and other corticosteroids suppress the immune system and quell ... Read more

Related support groups: Methylprednisolone, Pneumonia, Renal Failure, Medrol, Chronic Kidney Disease, Meningitis, Solu-Medrol, Medrol Dosepak, MethylPREDNISolone Dose Pack, Depo-Medrol, Diagnosis and Investigation, IgA Nephropathy, Methylprednisolone Topical, A-methapred, Duralone, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders, Adlone-40, Methacort 40, Med-Jec-40, Dep Medalone 80

Researchers Grow Functioning Liver Tissue in Mice

Posted 19 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 19, 2017 – Researchers say they were able to coax tiny "seeds" of liver tissue into fully functioning livers in mice. If this approach works in people, it could help reduce long wait lists for liver transplants. It might also benefit people with failing livers who don't quality for liver transplants, according to the researchers. The scientists placed three types of liver cells – the seeds – into biodegradable tissue scaffolds. They then implanted those scaffolds in mice with damaged livers. Once inside the mice, the tiny structures grew 50-fold and were able to perform normal liver tissue functions. "There are just not enough organs to go around. Our goal is that one day we could use this technology to increase the number of transplants that are done for patients, which right now is very limited," said senior author Dr. Sangeeta Bhatia. She's a professor of health ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Renal Transplant, Chronic Kidney Disease, Organ Transplant - Rejection Prophylaxis, Organ Transplant, Kidney Transplant, Liver and Pancreatic Disease

Thyroid Problems May Make Things Worse for Dialysis Patients

Posted 14 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 13, 2017 – Poor thyroid function may diminish kidney dialysis patients' health and quality of life, a new study suggests. Hypothyroidism – a condition in which the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone – is common in dialysis patients, but how it affects them has been unclear. Dialysis is treatment for kidney failure, where patients need a machine to filter their blood of wastes, salts and extra fluids. This study included 450 dialysis patients who completed questionnaires every six months and had their thyroid function assessed. Poor thyroid function was associated with poorer health-related quality of life, including low energy, increased fatigue, reduced physical function and greater pain. "Given the high prevalence of thyroid dysfunction and low levels of quality of life in dialysis patients, future research is needed to determine the underlying ... Read more

Related support groups: Thyroid Disease, Hypothyroidism, Underactive Thyroid, Renal Failure, Hyperthyroidism, Chronic Kidney Disease, Goiter, Hemodialysis, Peritoneal dialysis, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders, Hemodialysis Anticoagulation

Are Doctors Discarding Donor Kidneys That Could Save Lives?

Posted 7 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 – U.S. doctors are discarding donated kidneys that could keep people alive for years, simply because the organs are not top-quality, a new study claims. "Suboptimal" kidneys from older donors with health problems perform much better than expected, and would preserve a patient's life much longer than dialysis, said lead researcher Dr. Sumit Mohan, an assistant professor at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. About 73 percent of lower-quality kidneys received by Columbia patients were still functioning five years after transplant, Mohan and his colleagues found. "To our surprise, yes, they did worse than the best-quality kidneys, but they didn't do that poorly," Mohan said. By comparison, the five-year survival rate for kidney patients on dialysis is about 35 percent, Mohan said. "If I don't get a kidney, my alternative is to stay on dialysis," ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Renal Transplant, Chronic Kidney Disease, Peritoneal dialysis, Organ Transplant, Kidney Transplant, Organ Transplant - Rejection Reversal, Nephropathy, Rejection Prophylaxis, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders, Hyperphosphatemia of Renal Failure, Rejection Reversal

Elevated Protein Level Increases Blacks' Risk of Kidney Disease

Posted 27 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 27, 2017 – Black Americans with gene variants that raise their risk of chronic kidney disease don't always develop it, and researchers now think they know why. Fifteen to 20 percent of black Americans have inherited variations of the apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) that put them at risk for chronic kidney disease, but only about half of them are diagnosed with the illness. Scientists analyzed blood samples from more than 1,000 black Americans who had the genetic risk. They found that elevated levels of a protein called suPAR triggered the start and progression of chronic kidney disease in those with the gene variants. "What we are learning today is that suPAR ... is to kidneys what cholesterol is to the heart, a substance that can cause damage if levels rise too high, or a substance that can likely make many forms of kidney disease worse," said senior study author Dr. Jochen ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Diagnosis and Investigation, Nephropathy, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

'Couch Potatoes' May Face Higher Risk of Kidney, Bladder Cancers

Posted 15 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 15, 2017 – Add greater risk of kidney and bladder cancer to the long list of why a lifetime of sitting on the sofa isn't good for your health, a new study suggests. Specifically, lifetime recreational inactivity was associated with a 73 percent increased risk of bladder cancer and a 77 percent increased risk of kidney cancer. The findings add to growing evidence that inactivity may be a significant risk factor for cancer, the researchers said. "We hope that findings like ours will motivate inactive people to engage in some form of physical activity," said study senior author Kirsten Moysich. She is a professor of oncology at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, N.Y. "You don't have to run marathons to reduce your cancer risk, but you have to do something – even small adjustments like taking the stairs instead of the elevator, walking around the block a couple of ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Cancer, Weight Loss, Renal Failure, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Chronic Kidney Disease, Bladder Cancer, Solid Tumors, Urothelial Carcinoma

1 in 7 Americans Has Kidney Disease: CDC

Posted 9 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 9, 2017 – Thirty million American adults have chronic kidney disease – but many don't know it. That rate – one in seven – is higher than previously estimated, according to an analysis of data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The findings, based on 2011-2014 statistics, should "serve as a warning bell that a major public health challenge is right in front of our eyes and more must be done to address it," Kevin Longino, CEO of the National Kidney Foundation, said in a news release from the group. Chronic kidney disease occurs when the kidneys are damaged or can't filter blood as well as healthy kidneys. As a result, the body retains excess fluid and waste from the blood, which can cause other health problems. About 96 percent of those with early kidney disease don't know they have it. The same is true of nearly half who have severely reduced ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Peritoneal dialysis, Renal Osteodystrophy, Hyperphosphatemia of Renal Failure

Are Many A-Fib Patients Getting Wrong Doses?

Posted 5 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 5, 2017 – Nearly one in six Americans who takes newer blood thinners for the heart rhythm problem atrial fibrillation may not receive the proper dose, a new study suggests. A-fib is a common condition, marked by an irregular and often rapid heart beat. It's associated with a fivefold increased risk of stroke, but blood thinners reduce that risk. Many a-fib patients also have kidney disease and need a lower medication dose than others, the study authors said. "Dosing errors of these blood-thinning medications in patients with atrial fibrillation are common and have concerning adverse outcomes," said lead author Xiaoxi Yao, a researcher at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Moreover, "the number of patients using these drugs has quickly increased since the introduction of this new class of drugs in 2010," Yao said in a Mayo news release. The researchers looked at nearly ... Read more

Related support groups: Warfarin, Coumadin, Atrial Fibrillation, Xarelto, Pradaxa, Renal Failure, Eliquis, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Chronic Kidney Disease, Rivaroxaban, Apixaban, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Arixtra, Jantoven, Dabigatran, Fondaparinux, Savaysa, Edoxaban, Reversal of Dabigatran, Arixtra 10 mg/dose

Kidney Disease a Big Contributor to Heart-Related Deaths: Study

Posted 15 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 13, 2017 – Kidney disease is a major cause of heart-related deaths worldwide, a new study reports. Based on data from 188 countries at six time points between 1990 and 2013, the researchers estimated that in 2013, reduced kidney function was associated with 4 percent of deaths worldwide, or 2.2 million deaths. More than half of these deaths (1.2 million) were heart-related, while nearly 1 million were caused by kidney failure, according to the report. The findings provide new insight into the significant impact of kidney disease, also called "renal" disease, and highlight the importance of screening for kidney problems, the study authors said. "Understanding the true health impact of kidney disease on society necessitates considering cardiovascular as well as end-stage renal disease deaths and disability," said Dr. Bernadette Thomas, of the University of Washington in ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, High Cholesterol, Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Peritoneal dialysis, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Health Tip: Should You Be Tested for Kidney Disease?

Posted 11 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Chronic kidney disease may not have obvious symptoms, so it's important to know if you're at risk. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says risk factors include: Having diabetes. Having high blood pressure. Having heart disease. Having someone in your family with chronic kidney disease. Being black, Hispanic/Latino or American Indian. Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Renal Failure, Pre-Diabetes, Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Marathon Running May Cause Short-Term Kidney Injury

Posted 28 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 28, 2017 – Any marathoner will tell you that the grueling 26-mile races can do a number on the hips, knees, ankles and feet. Now, a small study suggests that these tests of endurance are also tough on the kidneys. "Marathon runners demonstrate transient or reversible short-term kidney injury," said Dr. Chirag Parikh, professor of medicine at Yale University. In his study of 22 participants in the 2015 Hartford, Conn. Marathon, Parikh found that 82 percent showed acute kidney injury after the race. In this condition, the kidneys fail to filter waste from the blood. The good news is that the kidney injury seems to clear up within two days of the race, he said. "On day 2, they are all fine," Parikh said. Runners likely don't even know they've had this transient injury, Parikh said. "For the short term, I don't think they would notice anything," he said. Parikh isn't certain ... Read more

Related support groups: Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Acetaminophen, Advil, Aleve, Renal Failure, Paracetamol, Motrin, Fioricet, Excedrin, Darvocet-N 100, Endocet, Acetaminophen/Hydrocodone, Tylenol PM, Tylenol with Codeine

Many Dialysis Patients Get Unnecessary Colonoscopies

Posted 24 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 24, 2017 – Older Americans on kidney dialysis have high rates of colonoscopy screening for colon cancer, but most get little benefit from the screening, a new study suggests. Dialysis patients have high rates of death, so routine colon cancer screening doesn't improve survival for most dialysis patients who don't qualify for a kidney transplant. Therefore, dialysis patients who have a limited life expectancy and no signs or symptoms of colon cancer shouldn't undergo screening for the disease, according to the American Society of Nephrology. "Physicians should carefully evaluate patients' prognoses and consider the likelihood that they will truly benefit before ordering screening tests," said study co-leader Dr. Christopher Carlos, from the University of California, San Francisco. In this study, researchers reviewed data from more than 469,000 Medicare beneficiaries. They ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Renal Failure, Colorectal Cancer, Renal Transplant, Chronic Kidney Disease, Hemodialysis, Peritoneal dialysis

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