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Related terms: Acute Kidney Failure, Acute Renal Failure, Chronic Renal Failure, Kidney Failure, CRF

Kidney Disease a Big Contributor to Heart-Related Deaths: Study

Posted 15 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 13, 2017 – Kidney disease is a major cause of heart-related deaths worldwide, a new study reports. Based on data from 188 countries at six time points between 1990 and 2013, the researchers estimated that in 2013, reduced kidney function was associated with 4 percent of deaths worldwide, or 2.2 million deaths. More than half of these deaths (1.2 million) were heart-related, while nearly 1 million were caused by kidney failure, according to the report. The findings provide new insight into the significant impact of kidney disease, also called "renal" disease, and highlight the importance of screening for kidney problems, the study authors said. "Understanding the true health impact of kidney disease on society necessitates considering cardiovascular as well as end-stage renal disease deaths and disability," said Dr. Bernadette Thomas, of the University of Washington in ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, High Cholesterol, Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Peritoneal dialysis, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Health Tip: Should You Be Tested for Kidney Disease?

Posted 11 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Chronic kidney disease may not have obvious symptoms, so it's important to know if you're at risk. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says risk factors include: Having diabetes. Having high blood pressure. Having heart disease. Having someone in your family with chronic kidney disease. Being black, Hispanic/Latino or American Indian. Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Renal Failure, Pre-Diabetes, Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Marathon Running May Cause Short-Term Kidney Injury

Posted 28 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 28, 2017 – Any marathoner will tell you that the grueling 26-mile races can do a number on the hips, knees, ankles and feet. Now, a small study suggests that these tests of endurance are also tough on the kidneys. "Marathon runners demonstrate transient or reversible short-term kidney injury," said Dr. Chirag Parikh, professor of medicine at Yale University. In his study of 22 participants in the 2015 Hartford, Conn. Marathon, Parikh found that 82 percent showed acute kidney injury after the race. In this condition, the kidneys fail to filter waste from the blood. The good news is that the kidney injury seems to clear up within two days of the race, he said. "On day 2, they are all fine," Parikh said. Runners likely don't even know they've had this transient injury, Parikh said. "For the short term, I don't think they would notice anything," he said. Parikh isn't certain ... Read more

Related support groups: Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Acetaminophen, Advil, Aleve, Renal Failure, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Motrin, Excedrin, Darvocet-N 100, Endocet, Acetaminophen/Hydrocodone, Tylenol PM, Tylenol with Codeine

Many Dialysis Patients Get Unnecessary Colonoscopies

Posted 24 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 24, 2017 – Older Americans on kidney dialysis have high rates of colonoscopy screening for colon cancer, but most get little benefit from the screening, a new study suggests. Dialysis patients have high rates of death, so routine colon cancer screening doesn't improve survival for most dialysis patients who don't qualify for a kidney transplant. Therefore, dialysis patients who have a limited life expectancy and no signs or symptoms of colon cancer shouldn't undergo screening for the disease, according to the American Society of Nephrology. "Physicians should carefully evaluate patients' prognoses and consider the likelihood that they will truly benefit before ordering screening tests," said study co-leader Dr. Christopher Carlos, from the University of California, San Francisco. In this study, researchers reviewed data from more than 469,000 Medicare beneficiaries. They ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Renal Failure, Colorectal Cancer, Renal Transplant, Chronic Kidney Disease, Hemodialysis, Peritoneal dialysis

Sickle Cell Trait Tied to Higher Kidney Failure Risk for Blacks

Posted 9 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 9, 2017 – Black people with a trait for sickle cell anemia appear to have double the risk of kidney failure that requires dialysis, new research suggests. "Although you cannot change the genes you are born with, doctors can use this information to start screening for kidney disease earlier and to aggressively treat any other risk factors you may have such as diabetes or high blood pressure," said study co-leader Dr. Rakhi Naik. She's an assistant professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disorder that affects hemoglobin – the substance in red blood cells that carries oxygen through the blood. This disease causes the hemoglobin to form in a sickle shape instead of the normal rounded disc shape, according to the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. To have sickle cell anemia, a person must inherit the ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Anemia - Sickle Cell, Diagnosis and Investigation

Skin Diseases Take Big Slice Out of America's Health, Economy

Posted 2 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 2, 2017 – Skin diseases have a major impact on Americans and the U.S. economy, a new report finds. "The impact of skin disease in this country is staggering, affecting one in every four Americans each year and taking a toll on lives, livelihoods and our economy," said study leader Dr. Henry Lim, incoming president of the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). For the report, AAD researchers looked at medical claims data from 2013 on 24 skin diseases, and estimated that more than 85 million Americans are affected. People may think skin conditions aren't particularly serious, but half of the skin diseases included in the research could result in death. Skin cancers accounted for 60 percent of skin disease-related deaths, according to the report. The number of people in the United States with skin diseases in 2013 was higher than those with heart disease, diabetes or ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Skin Rash, Heart Disease, Psoriasis, Renal Failure, Insulin Resistance, Skin Cancer, Skin and Structure Infection, Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, History - Skin Cancer, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

Cutting Salt a Health Boost for Kidney Patients

Posted 17 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 16, 2017 – Encouraging people with kidney disease to reduce their salt intake may help improve blood pressure and cut excess fluid retention, at least for a while, a new study suggests. Study participants lowered their systolic blood pressure (the top number) by almost 11 points, on average, on a salt-restricted diet versus their usual diet. They also flushed out a liter of water (about one-quart) from their bodies, on average, by slashing salt in their diets, researchers said. Having high blood pressure and retaining excess salt and water in the body stresses the heart and blood vessels, explained lead author Dr. Rajiv Saran of the University of Michigan. For kidney disease patients, high blood pressure (or "hypertension") and excess fluid in the body can be a toxic combination. "They die predominantly of cardiovascular disease," said Saran, a professor of internal ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Sodium Chloride, Diabetic Kidney Disease, Peritoneal dialysis, Diabetic Nephropathy, Anemia Associated with Chronic Renal Failure, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Renal Osteodystrophy, Hyper-Sal, Rhinaris, Ayr Saline Nasal, ENTsol, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Saline Nasal Mist, Thermotabs, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride

Non-English Speakers Less Likely to Be on Kidney Transplant List

Posted 9 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 9, 2017 – Language barriers may prevent some eligible U.S. patients from receiving a kidney transplant, a new study suggests. Specifically, those who don't speak English may be less likely to complete the kidney transplant evaluation necessary for them to be placed on a waiting list for a kidney from a deceased donor. For the study, researchers analyzed data from kidney failure patients across the United States. The investigators found that patients who lived in neighborhoods where more than 20 percent of households didn't speak English were 29 percent less likely to be on a kidney transplant waiting list than those in neighborhoods where less than 1 percent of households didn't speak English. Although the study can't prove a cause-and-effect relationship, the researchers found the link between not speaking English and not being on a kidney transplant waiting list was ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Renal Transplant, Chronic Kidney Disease, Organ Transplant - Rejection Prophylaxis, Organ Transplant, Organ Transplant - Rejection Reversal, Hyperphosphatemia of Renal Failure

FDA Approves Amgen's Parsabiv (etelcalcetide) for Secondary Hyperparathyroidism in Adult Patients on Hemodialysis

Posted 8 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THOUSAND OAKS, Calif., Feb. 7, 2017 /PRNewswire/ – Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Parsabiv (etelcalcetide) for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) in adult patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on hemodialysis. Parsabiv is the first therapy approved for this condition in 12 years and the only calcimimetic that can be administered intravenously by the dialysis health care team three times a week at the end of the hemodialysis session. "We are excited about today's approval of Parsabiv in the U.S. and the opportunity to provide patients and health care providers with a novel option to help treat a complex disease that affects a significant number of patients on hemodialysis," said Sean E. Harper, M.D., executive vice president of Research and Development at Amgen. "Parsabiv not only has demonstrated ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Dialysis, Chronic Kidney Disease, Hemodialysis, Hyperparathyroidism, Hyperparathyroidism Secondary to Renal Impairment, Etelcalcetide, Parsabiv

Undocumented Immigrants Often Face Tough Health Care Choices

Posted 6 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 6, 2017 – Two new studies offer insights into the medical plights facing undocumented immigrants in the United States. One finds that some hospice programs often refuse to accept these immigrants in the final days of their lives. The other reveals the hardships faced by those suffering from kidney failure who can't get regular dialysis, the study authors said. Dialysis rids the body of toxins when the kidneys don't work properly. The laws limiting dialysis for immigrants who are in the country illegally "have a profound impact," said Dr. Lilia Cervantes, a Colorado researcher who interviewed 20 kidney failure patients about their experiences. "They have immense distress," she said. At issue: The limitations of publicly funded health care for poor undocumented immigrants for routine dialysis and hospice care. The Medicaid programs in some states like California and New York ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Peritoneal dialysis, Hyperphosphatemia of Renal Failure

Native Americans Make Progress Against Diabetes Complication

Posted 10 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 – Diabetes-related kidney failure among Native American adults fell by more than half over almost 20 years, a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report shows. The change is due to improvements in diabetes and kidney care, according to the report. The new research also found that among these patients, blood sugar control improved 10 percent between 1996 and 2014, and the use of medicine to protect kidneys rose from 42 percent to 74 percent over 5 years. Average blood pressure in Native Americans with diabetes and high blood pressure was well controlled (133/76 in 2015), the findings showed. In addition, more than 60 percent of Native Americans aged 65 and older with diabetes had a urine test for kidney damage in 2015, compared with 40 percent of Medicare patients with diabetes in 2013, the researchers said. "The Indian Health Service (IHS) has made ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Metformin, Insulin, Lantus, Renal Failure, Glucophage, Glipizide, Novolog, Humalog, Janumet, Insulin Resistance, Glyburide, Lantus Solostar, Levemir, Pre-Diabetes, Glimepiride, Chronic Kidney Disease, Novolin R, Amaryl, Novolin N

For Kids With Kidney Disease, Race May Play Role in Outcomes

Posted 30 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 29, 2016 – Black children are about one-third more likely to die from kidney failure than white children, and access to kidney transplants may be a crucial factor explaining the discrepancy, a new study suggests. Dr. Elaine Ku, of the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues tracked the health of more than 12,000 black, Hispanic and white children who had chronic kidney failure. All had been treated for kidney disease with either dialysis or transplants between 1995 and 2011. The investigators followed the kids' health until 2012 for a median of 7 years. Over the follow-up period, 1,600 of the children died. Black children were 36 percent more likely than white children to die, the findings showed. The researchers said that they believe this difference mostly has to do with limited access to kidney transplants. However, Hispanic children were less likely ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Renal Transplant, Chronic Kidney Disease

Past Kidney Damage Linked to Pregnancy Problems

Posted 23 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 22, 2016 – Women with prior kidney damage may have an increased risk for pregnancy complications, a new study suggests. "We believe that this study highlights an important finding that will be useful for medical providers caring for reproductive-age women," said study author Dr. Jessica Sheehan Tangren, a nephrologist from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. The researchers reviewed data from almost 25,000 women who gave birth at Massachusetts General Hospital between 1998 and 2007. Just over 100 of the women had previously experienced acute kidney injury. This is a sudden decrease in kidney function. All of the women had recovered normal kidney function before they were pregnant. Women in the kidney damage group had much higher rates of a condition called preeclampsia that causes high blood pressure and other problems during pregnancy – 23 percent compared to 4 ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Emergency Contraception, Postcoital Contraception, Renal Failure, Delivery, Chronic Kidney Disease, Toxemia of pregnancy, Cesarean Section, Labor Pain, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Hyperphosphatemia of Renal Failure

Smoking in Pregnancy Tied to Kidney Damage in Kids

Posted 23 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 22, 2016 – Children of mothers who smoke during pregnancy may be at increased risk for kidney damage, a new study warns. Researchers looked at test results for excessive protein in the urine (proteinuria) – which is a sign of reduced kidney function – in nearly 44,600 children in Japan who were followed until age 3. Among the mothers in the study, nearly 5 percent smoked only before pregnancy and about 17 percent of those women continued smoking while pregnant, the study authors said. Children of mothers who smoked during pregnancy were 1.24 times more likely to show signs of kidney damage than those whose mothers were nonsmokers, the investigators found. Although the study found an association between smoking during pregnancy and kidney damage in children, it could not prove cause and effect. "Maternal smoking during pregnancy is known to be associated with preterm ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Don't Rule Out Kidneys From Elderly Donors

Posted 16 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 15, 2016 – Healthy kidneys from elderly donors are often rejected, but even kidneys from donors 80 and older can function for years after transplantation, Italian researchers report. The results were published online Dec. 15 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. "The results of this study support the use of extended criteria donors, even donors older than 80 years, but they have to be accurately selected and managed with dedicated protocols," Dr. Luigi Biancone, of the University of Turin, said in a journal news release. Researchers analyzed results of deceased donor kidney transplants performed at the Turin University Renal Transplant Center between 2003 and 2013. They focused on almost 650 transplants from so-called "extended criteria" donors – donors older than 60 and those aged 50 to 59 with certain risk factors. After a follow-up of nearly ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Renal Transplant, Chronic Kidney Disease, Organ Transplant - Rejection Prophylaxis, Peritoneal dialysis, Organ Transplant, Kidney Transplant, Graft-versus-host disease, Rejection Prophylaxis, Hyperphosphatemia of Renal Failure

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