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Renal and Genitourinary Disorders News

Thyroid Problems May Make Things Worse for Dialysis Patients

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 13, 2017 – Poor thyroid function may diminish kidney dialysis patients' health and quality of life, a new study suggests. Hypothyroidism – a condition in which the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone – is common in dialysis patients, but how it affects them has been unclear. Dialysis is treatment for kidney failure, where patients need a machine to filter their blood of wastes, salts and extra fluids. This study included 450 dialysis patients who completed questionnaires every six months and had their thyroid function assessed. Poor thyroid function was associated with poorer health-related quality of life, including low energy, increased fatigue, reduced physical function and greater pain. "Given the high prevalence of thyroid dysfunction and low levels of quality of life in dialysis patients, future research is needed to determine the underlying ... Read more

Related support groups: Thyroid Disease, Hypothyroidism, Underactive Thyroid, Renal Failure, Hyperthyroidism, Chronic Kidney Disease, Goiter, Peritoneal dialysis, Hemodialysis, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders, Hemodialysis Anticoagulation

Are Doctors Discarding Donor Kidneys That Could Save Lives?

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 – U.S. doctors are discarding donated kidneys that could keep people alive for years, simply because the organs are not top-quality, a new study claims. "Suboptimal" kidneys from older donors with health problems perform much better than expected, and would preserve a patient's life much longer than dialysis, said lead researcher Dr. Sumit Mohan, an assistant professor at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. About 73 percent of lower-quality kidneys received by Columbia patients were still functioning five years after transplant, Mohan and his colleagues found. "To our surprise, yes, they did worse than the best-quality kidneys, but they didn't do that poorly," Mohan said. By comparison, the five-year survival rate for kidney patients on dialysis is about 35 percent, Mohan said. "If I don't get a kidney, my alternative is to stay on dialysis," ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Renal Transplant, Chronic Kidney Disease, Peritoneal dialysis, Organ Transplant, Kidney Transplant, Organ Transplant - Rejection Reversal, Nephropathy, Rejection Prophylaxis, Rejection Reversal, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders, Hyperphosphatemia of Renal Failure

Catheters Often to Blame for Blood Infections After Dialysis

Posted 30 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 30, 2017 – Tubes called catheters that are used to draw and return blood to the body during dialysis appear to cause the majority of bloodstream infections in people receiving dialysis for kidney problems, a new study finds. Three-quarters of bloodstream infections in dialysis patients were related to accessing their blood, the 2014 U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data showed. The information came from more than 6,000 outpatient dialysis centers in 2014. There were nearly 30,000 bloodstream infections reported, the study found. The analysis also found that 63 percent of all bloodstream infections and 70 percent of access-related bloodstream infections occurred in patients with a central venous catheter – also called a central line. Other dialysis complication rates were also highest among patients using central venous catheters, the findings showed. ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Trimethoprim, Nitrofurantoin, Macrobid, Macrodantin, Methicillin, Methenamine, Hiprex, Fosfomycin, Cystex, Monurol, Urex, Methylene Blue, Nalidixic Acid, Mandelamine, Uroqid-Acid No 2, Primsol, Staphcillin, Hyoscyamine/Methenamine

Elevated Protein Level Increases Blacks' Risk of Kidney Disease

Posted 27 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 27, 2017 – Black Americans with gene variants that raise their risk of chronic kidney disease don't always develop it, and researchers now think they know why. Fifteen to 20 percent of black Americans have inherited variations of the apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) that put them at risk for chronic kidney disease, but only about half of them are diagnosed with the illness. Scientists analyzed blood samples from more than 1,000 black Americans who had the genetic risk. They found that elevated levels of a protein called suPAR triggered the start and progression of chronic kidney disease in those with the gene variants. "What we are learning today is that suPAR ... is to kidneys what cholesterol is to the heart, a substance that can cause damage if levels rise too high, or a substance that can likely make many forms of kidney disease worse," said senior study author Dr. Jochen ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Diagnosis and Investigation, Nephropathy, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

Marathon Running May Cause Short-Term Kidney Injury

Posted 28 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 28, 2017 – Any marathoner will tell you that the grueling 26-mile races can do a number on the hips, knees, ankles and feet. Now, a small study suggests that these tests of endurance are also tough on the kidneys. "Marathon runners demonstrate transient or reversible short-term kidney injury," said Dr. Chirag Parikh, professor of medicine at Yale University. In his study of 22 participants in the 2015 Hartford, Conn. Marathon, Parikh found that 82 percent showed acute kidney injury after the race. In this condition, the kidneys fail to filter waste from the blood. The good news is that the kidney injury seems to clear up within two days of the race, he said. "On day 2, they are all fine," Parikh said. Runners likely don't even know they've had this transient injury, Parikh said. "For the short term, I don't think they would notice anything," he said. Parikh isn't certain ... Read more

Related support groups: Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Acetaminophen, Advil, Aleve, Renal Failure, Paracetamol, Motrin, Fioricet, Excedrin, Darvocet-N 100, Endocet, Acetaminophen/Hydrocodone, Tylenol PM, Tylenol with Codeine

Cutting Salt a Health Boost for Kidney Patients

Posted 17 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 16, 2017 – Encouraging people with kidney disease to reduce their salt intake may help improve blood pressure and cut excess fluid retention, at least for a while, a new study suggests. Study participants lowered their systolic blood pressure (the top number) by almost 11 points, on average, on a salt-restricted diet versus their usual diet. They also flushed out a liter of water (about one-quart) from their bodies, on average, by slashing salt in their diets, researchers said. Having high blood pressure and retaining excess salt and water in the body stresses the heart and blood vessels, explained lead author Dr. Rajiv Saran of the University of Michigan. For kidney disease patients, high blood pressure (or "hypertension") and excess fluid in the body can be a toxic combination. "They die predominantly of cardiovascular disease," said Saran, a professor of internal ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Sodium Chloride, Diabetic Kidney Disease, Peritoneal dialysis, Diabetic Nephropathy, Anemia Associated with Chronic Renal Failure, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Renal Osteodystrophy, Hyper-Sal, Rhinaris, Thermotabs, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Ayr Saline Nasal, ENTsol, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Saline Nasal Mist

Constipation, Kidney Disease May Be Linked, New Research Shows

Posted 11 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 10, 2016 – People with constipation are more likely to develop kidney disease, a new study finds. The discovery suggests kidney problems might be prevented or treated by managing constipation, according to researchers at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and Memphis VA Medical Center. They studied the medical records of 3.5 million U.S. veterans with normal kidney function. They were tracked from 2004 to 2006, and followed through 2013. Those with constipation were 13 percent more likely than patients without constipation to develop chronic kidney disease and 9 percent more likely to experience kidney failure. The risk was even higher for those whose constipation was more severe. The study did not prove that constipation causes kidney disease or failure, however. Instead, "Our findings highlight the plausible link between the gut and the kidneys and ... Read more

Related support groups: Constipation, Renal Failure, Constipation - Chronic, Chronic Kidney Disease, Constipation - Acute, Constipation - Drug Induced, Fecal Impaction, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

Study Counters Notion That Heart Surgery Poses More Kidney Risks to Women

Posted 21 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 – A new study challenges the belief that women are more likely than men to develop kidney damage after heart surgery. Researchers reviewed 64 studies that included more than 1 million patients to see the actual risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) after heart surgery. AKI is a sudden decrease in kidney function. This condition can occur when kidneys are deprived of normal blood flow during major surgery. The studies covered a period of more than 25 years. Previous research has shown that women are more likely than men to develop kidney damage after heart surgery, yet the opposite is true after general surgery. The new study found that women, in general, were more likely than men to develop kidney damage after heart surgery. But, this wasn't the case when patient characteristics and other factors were taken into account. For example, women having heart surgery were ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Heart Disease, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

When Complications Arise, Some Hospitals Get Paid a Lot More

Posted 12 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 – Medicare pays some U.S. hospitals two to three times more than others to care for older adults who experience complications after major surgery, a new analysis finds. Those higher payments aren't always associated with better clinical care, the study authors said. The findings suggest that some hospitals deal with surgical complications, such as serious bleeding, infection and kidney failure, more efficiently than others, the authors noted. "If we had found that they're spending more money, but they're actually saving people's lives, it's worth it, right?" said Dr. Hari Nathan, the study's senior author. "But that's actually not what we found," said Nathan, an assistant professor of surgery at the University of Michigan Medical School. "They're not actually getting any better outcomes," he said. Hospitals with the highest "cost of rescue" – the costs of ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Bleeding Disorder, Blood Transfusion, Orthopedic Surgery, Postoperative Albumin Loss, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

Diet Supplement May Help Prevent Kidney Stones: Study

Posted 8 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 8, 2016 – A dietary supplement may hold the power to dissolve a key component of kidney stones, potentially offering a new prevention tool against this painful condition, researchers say. It's too early to be sure if the compound hydroxycitrate will become a preventive treatment for kidney stones, since extensive research in people hasn't begun. Still, it could offer an alternative to potassium citrate, which treats kidney stones but has side effects, the study authors explained. At issue: the calcium oxalate crystals that are the most common component of kidney stones, mineral deposits that form inside the kidneys. They may get stuck in the urinary tract, blocking urination and causing great pain. Kidney stones affect an estimated 12 percent of men and 7 percent of women. High blood pressure, diabetes and obesity can increase the risk. Physicians often urge people who are ... Read more

Related support groups: Dietary Supplementation, Chronic Kidney Disease, Urinary Tract Stones, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders, Calcium Oxalate Calculi with Hyperuricosuria

Too Much Red Meat Might Harm Kidneys, Study Suggests

Posted 14 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 14, 2016 – Eating red meat may boost the risk for kidney failure, but swapping even one daily serving of red meat for another protein may reduce the risk, a large study from Singapore suggests. Red meat intake – in this case, mostly pork – was strongly associated with an increased risk of end-stage renal disease, the loss of normal kidney function. The relationship was also "dose dependent" – meaning the higher the consumption, the greater the risk. The association held up even after compensating for factors that could skew the results, such as lifestyle and other health conditions, the study authors noted. "Our findings suggest that patients with chronic kidney disease or the general population worried about their kidney health can still maintain protein intake but consider switching to plant-based sources," said Dr. Woon-Puay Koh, professor in the Office of Clinical ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Anuria, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

Coming Soon: A Wearable Artificial Kidney?

Posted 7 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 7, 2016 - Someday, dialysis patients might free themselves of clunky machines, moving about with a "wearable artificial kidney" instead. That's the promise of a new clinical trial that suggests this type of technology is finally within reach. "This would be a game changer," said one kidney specialist, Dr. Maria DeVita. "The fact that clinical trials are beginning gives us all hope that we will have a significant improvement in the care of those patients requiring ongoing hemodialysis." DeVita is associate director of nephrology at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. People with advanced kidney disease must often resort to spending hours a day at dialysis centers, with special machines cleansing their blood as their kidneys once did. The dream has long been a small portable device that could perform dialysis as patients went about their usual day. That dream may be ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetic Kidney Disease, Nephrotic Syndrome, Peritoneal dialysis, Hemodialysis, Diabetic Nephropathy, Anemia Associated with Chronic Renal Failure, Polycystic Kidney Disease, Diagnosis and Investigation, Renal Osteodystrophy, Alport Syndrome, Hyperphosphatemia of Renal Failure, Anuria, Hypertensive Renal Disease, Hemodialysis Anticoagulation, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

Smoking Harms Black Americans' Kidneys, Study Suggests

Posted 25 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 – Smoking may pose a significant risk to kidney health for black Americans, new research suggests. The study included more than 3,600 black adults, aged 21 to 84, from Jackson, Miss., and the surrounding area. The researchers followed their health for 12 years. During that time, the researchers found that, overall, study participants who were current smokers had an 83 percent greater decline in kidney function than those who never smoked. The more a person smoked, the greater their rate of kidney decline, the findings showed. People who smoked up to 19 cigarettes a day had a 75 percent greater decline in kidney function. People who had 20 or more cigarettes a day had a 97 percent greater decline in kidney function, the study found. Though the study wasn't designed to prove cause-and-effect, the researchers said that current smokers had 38 percent higher ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Anemia Associated with Chronic Renal Failure, Nephropathy, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

High-Salt Diets May Raise Heart Risks for Kidney Patients

Posted 24 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 24, 2016 – People with chronic kidney disease face higher odds of heart attack or stroke if they have high-salt diets, a new study suggests. "Moderate sodium reduction among patients with chronic kidney disease and high sodium intake may lower [heart] risk," concluded a team led by Dr. Jiang He, of Tulane University in New Orleans. About one in every 10 Americans is affected by chronic kidney disease, and more than one-third of U.S. adults have heart disease, the researchers noted. The role of daily salt intake in kidney patients – and its effect on heart risk – hasn't been clear, however. To learn more, the investigators looked at outcomes for almost 3,800 patients with chronic kidney disease at seven locations across the United States. The patients provided urine samples to researchers at the beginning of the study in 2003, and then once a year over the next two years. ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Renal Failure, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Chronic Kidney Disease, Sodium Chloride, Diabetic Kidney Disease, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Peritoneal dialysis, Hemodialysis, Diabetic Nephropathy, Anemia Associated with Chronic Renal Failure, Hematuria, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Hyper-Sal, Rhinaris, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Thermotabs, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride

Common Heartburn Drugs Linked to Kidney Disease in Study

Posted 15 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 14, 2016 – People who use certain drugs for chronic heartburn may be at increased risk of developing kidney disease, a new study suggests. The research is the latest to highlight potential risks from drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). PPIs include prescription and over-the-counter drugs, such as Prilosec, Prevacid and Nexium. But prolonged use of PPIs has been linked to certain nutrient deficiencies and bone-density loss. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, bone fractures are considered a safety concern when people use PPIs for a year or more. More recently, research has hinted at additional hazards. Last year, for example, a study tied the medications to a slight increase in heart attack risk. However, neither that study nor this new one prove that PPIs are directly to blame for these problems. "I cannot say for certain that this is ... Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Omeprazole, Prilosec, Pantoprazole, Protonix, Renal Failure, Barrett's Esophagus, Chronic Kidney Disease, Zegerid, Prilosec OTC, Omeprazole/Sodium Bicarbonate/Magnesium Hydroxide, Zegerid OTC, Omeclamox-Pak, Omeprazole/Sodium Bicarbonate, Protonix IV, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders, Omesec, Amoxicillin/clarithromycin/omeprazole

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