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Renal and Genitourinary Disorders News

Constipation, Kidney Disease May Be Linked, New Research Shows

Posted 11 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 10, 2016 – People with constipation are more likely to develop kidney disease, a new study finds. The discovery suggests kidney problems might be prevented or treated by managing constipation, according to researchers at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and Memphis VA Medical Center. They studied the medical records of 3.5 million U.S. veterans with normal kidney function. They were tracked from 2004 to 2006, and followed through 2013. Those with constipation were 13 percent more likely than patients without constipation to develop chronic kidney disease and 9 percent more likely to experience kidney failure. The risk was even higher for those whose constipation was more severe. The study did not prove that constipation causes kidney disease or failure, however. Instead, "Our findings highlight the plausible link between the gut and the kidneys and ... Read more

Related support groups: Constipation, Renal Failure, Constipation - Chronic, Chronic Kidney Disease, Constipation - Acute, Constipation - Drug Induced, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders, Fecal Impaction

Study Counters Notion That Heart Surgery Poses More Kidney Risks to Women

Posted 21 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 – A new study challenges the belief that women are more likely than men to develop kidney damage after heart surgery. Researchers reviewed 64 studies that included more than 1 million patients to see the actual risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) after heart surgery. AKI is a sudden decrease in kidney function. This condition can occur when kidneys are deprived of normal blood flow during major surgery. The studies covered a period of more than 25 years. Previous research has shown that women are more likely than men to develop kidney damage after heart surgery, yet the opposite is true after general surgery. The new study found that women, in general, were more likely than men to develop kidney damage after heart surgery. But, this wasn't the case when patient characteristics and other factors were taken into account. For example, women having heart surgery were ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Heart Disease, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

When Complications Arise, Some Hospitals Get Paid a Lot More

Posted 12 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 – Medicare pays some U.S. hospitals two to three times more than others to care for older adults who experience complications after major surgery, a new analysis finds. Those higher payments aren't always associated with better clinical care, the study authors said. The findings suggest that some hospitals deal with surgical complications, such as serious bleeding, infection and kidney failure, more efficiently than others, the authors noted. "If we had found that they're spending more money, but they're actually saving people's lives, it's worth it, right?" said Dr. Hari Nathan, the study's senior author. "But that's actually not what we found," said Nathan, an assistant professor of surgery at the University of Michigan Medical School. "They're not actually getting any better outcomes," he said. Hospitals with the highest "cost of rescue" – the costs of ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Bleeding Disorder, Blood Transfusion, Orthopedic Surgery, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders, Postoperative Albumin Loss

Diet Supplement May Help Prevent Kidney Stones: Study

Posted 8 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 8, 2016 – A dietary supplement may hold the power to dissolve a key component of kidney stones, potentially offering a new prevention tool against this painful condition, researchers say. It's too early to be sure if the compound hydroxycitrate will become a preventive treatment for kidney stones, since extensive research in people hasn't begun. Still, it could offer an alternative to potassium citrate, which treats kidney stones but has side effects, the study authors explained. At issue: the calcium oxalate crystals that are the most common component of kidney stones, mineral deposits that form inside the kidneys. They may get stuck in the urinary tract, blocking urination and causing great pain. Kidney stones affect an estimated 12 percent of men and 7 percent of women. High blood pressure, diabetes and obesity can increase the risk. Physicians often urge people who are ... Read more

Related support groups: Dietary Supplementation, Chronic Kidney Disease, Urinary Tract Stones, Calcium Oxalate Calculi with Hyperuricosuria, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

Too Much Red Meat Might Harm Kidneys, Study Suggests

Posted 14 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 14, 2016 – Eating red meat may boost the risk for kidney failure, but swapping even one daily serving of red meat for another protein may reduce the risk, a large study from Singapore suggests. Red meat intake – in this case, mostly pork – was strongly associated with an increased risk of end-stage renal disease, the loss of normal kidney function. The relationship was also "dose dependent" – meaning the higher the consumption, the greater the risk. The association held up even after compensating for factors that could skew the results, such as lifestyle and other health conditions, the study authors noted. "Our findings suggest that patients with chronic kidney disease or the general population worried about their kidney health can still maintain protein intake but consider switching to plant-based sources," said Dr. Woon-Puay Koh, professor in the Office of Clinical ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders, Anuria

Coming Soon: A Wearable Artificial Kidney?

Posted 7 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 7, 2016 - Someday, dialysis patients might free themselves of clunky machines, moving about with a "wearable artificial kidney" instead. That's the promise of a new clinical trial that suggests this type of technology is finally within reach. "This would be a game changer," said one kidney specialist, Dr. Maria DeVita. "The fact that clinical trials are beginning gives us all hope that we will have a significant improvement in the care of those patients requiring ongoing hemodialysis." DeVita is associate director of nephrology at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. People with advanced kidney disease must often resort to spending hours a day at dialysis centers, with special machines cleansing their blood as their kidneys once did. The dream has long been a small portable device that could perform dialysis as patients went about their usual day. That dream may be ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetic Kidney Disease, Nephrotic Syndrome, Peritoneal dialysis, Hemodialysis, Diabetic Nephropathy, Anemia Associated with Chronic Renal Failure, Diagnosis and Investigation, Polycystic Kidney Disease, Renal Osteodystrophy, Hemodialysis Anticoagulation, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders, Alport Syndrome, Hyperphosphatemia of Renal Failure, Anuria, Hypertensive Renal Disease

Smoking Harms Black Americans' Kidneys, Study Suggests

Posted 25 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 – Smoking may pose a significant risk to kidney health for black Americans, new research suggests. The study included more than 3,600 black adults, aged 21 to 84, from Jackson, Miss., and the surrounding area. The researchers followed their health for 12 years. During that time, the researchers found that, overall, study participants who were current smokers had an 83 percent greater decline in kidney function than those who never smoked. The more a person smoked, the greater their rate of kidney decline, the findings showed. People who smoked up to 19 cigarettes a day had a 75 percent greater decline in kidney function. People who had 20 or more cigarettes a day had a 97 percent greater decline in kidney function, the study found. Though the study wasn't designed to prove cause-and-effect, the researchers said that current smokers had 38 percent higher ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Anemia Associated with Chronic Renal Failure, Nephropathy, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

High-Salt Diets May Raise Heart Risks for Kidney Patients

Posted 24 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 24, 2016 – People with chronic kidney disease face higher odds of heart attack or stroke if they have high-salt diets, a new study suggests. "Moderate sodium reduction among patients with chronic kidney disease and high sodium intake may lower [heart] risk," concluded a team led by Dr. Jiang He, of Tulane University in New Orleans. About one in every 10 Americans is affected by chronic kidney disease, and more than one-third of U.S. adults have heart disease, the researchers noted. The role of daily salt intake in kidney patients – and its effect on heart risk – hasn't been clear, however. To learn more, the investigators looked at outcomes for almost 3,800 patients with chronic kidney disease at seven locations across the United States. The patients provided urine samples to researchers at the beginning of the study in 2003, and then once a year over the next two years. ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Renal Failure, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Chronic Kidney Disease, Sodium Chloride, Diabetic Kidney Disease, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Diabetic Nephropathy, Peritoneal dialysis, Hemodialysis, Anemia Associated with Chronic Renal Failure, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Hematuria, Rhinaris, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Hyper-Sal, Saline Nasal Mist, Thermotabs

Common Heartburn Drugs Linked to Kidney Disease in Study

Posted 15 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 14, 2016 – People who use certain drugs for chronic heartburn may be at increased risk of developing kidney disease, a new study suggests. The research is the latest to highlight potential risks from drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). PPIs include prescription and over-the-counter drugs, such as Prilosec, Prevacid and Nexium. But prolonged use of PPIs has been linked to certain nutrient deficiencies and bone-density loss. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, bone fractures are considered a safety concern when people use PPIs for a year or more. More recently, research has hinted at additional hazards. Last year, for example, a study tied the medications to a slight increase in heart attack risk. However, neither that study nor this new one prove that PPIs are directly to blame for these problems. "I cannot say for certain that this is ... Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Omeprazole, Prilosec, Protonix, Renal Failure, Pantoprazole, Barrett's Esophagus, Chronic Kidney Disease, Zegerid, Prilosec OTC, Omeclamox-Pak, Omeprazole/Sodium Bicarbonate/Magnesium Hydroxide, Zegerid OTC, Protonix IV, Omeprazole/Sodium Bicarbonate, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders, Omesec, Amoxicillin/clarithromycin/omeprazole

Medicare Spends Billions on Chronic Kidney Disease, Study Finds

Posted 29 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 – Chronic kidney disease affects nearly 14 percent of Americans and costs Medicare billions of dollars a year, a new study reveals. In 2013, Medicare spent $50 billion on chronic kidney disease among people 65 and older, and $31 billion on those with kidney failure, the researchers found. "This report is a one-stop shop to try to understand the prevalence of kidney disease, how it's being treated and how the burden affects various populations," researcher Rajesh Balkrishnan, a professor of public health sciences at the University of Virginia School of Medicine, said in a university news release. "If we can identify which treatment modalities are working and how they're used and link these treatments to outcomes, we can inform the government of the most cost-effective ways to manage and treat the growing burden of kidney disease in the U.S.," he added. The study ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetic Kidney Disease, Diabetic Nephropathy, Peritoneal dialysis, Anemia Associated with Chronic Renal Failure, Renal Osteodystrophy, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders, Hypertensive Renal Disease, Renovascular Hypertension, Anuria, Hyperphosphatemia of Renal Failure, Hypertensive Heart (w/ CHF) and Renal Disease, Renal Artery Atherosclerosis

Kidney Dialysis Might Not Extend Survival of Elderly

Posted 18 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 – Dialysis does not significantly improve survival for elderly kidney failure patients, a new study indicates. The findings suggest that conservative care may be a reasonable option for some kidney failure patients over 80. The researchers don't say that dialysis treatment should not be given to anybody older than 80 or with severe co-occurring conditions. "But we show that the treatment is on average of little advantage regarding survival," said study co-leader Dr. Wouter Verberne of St. Antonius Hospital in Nieuwegein, the Netherlands. The findings were published online March 17 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. "Our next task is to predict who benefits and who does not," Verberne said in a journal news release. "Until we are able to give a better prediction of the results of dialysis treatment at high age, we can merely suggest ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetic Kidney Disease, Hemodialysis, Peritoneal dialysis, Diabetic Nephropathy, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders, Hyperphosphatemia of Renal Failure

Poor Leg Circulation Hits Women With Kidney Disease Earlier Than Men

Posted 23 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 23, 2016 – Compared to men, women under the age of 70 who have kidney disease are at higher odds for peripheral arterial disease (PAD), an often disabling impairment of blood flow in the legs. That's the finding from a new study of almost 3,200 people with chronic kidney disease. Researchers led by Dr. Grace Wang, of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, found that women under 70 with kidney disease had a 53 percent higher risk of PAD compared to their male peers. However, after age 70 the difference between the sexes evened out, the researchers noted. Why would PAD affect women earlier? According to the study authors, "females are known to have smaller diameter vessels compared to men." That could mean that, given similar amounts of plaque buildup in vessels, women's might close off earlier than men's. The findings show that women with kidney ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Raynaud's Syndrome, Diabetic Kidney Disease, Peripheral Arterial Disease, Diabetic Nephropathy, Peritoneal dialysis, Intermittent Claudication, Renal Osteodystrophy, Arterial Thrombosis, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

Poor Sleep Might Harm Kidneys, Study Suggests

Posted 5 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 5, 2015 – Lack of sleep may be a gateway to kidney disease, at least for women, a new study suggests. Researchers from Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital evaluated the sleep habits of thousands of women and found too little shuteye was tied to a more rapid decline in kidney function. Women who slept five hours or less a night had a 65 percent greater risk of rapid decline in kidney function, compared with women sleeping seven to eight hours a night, the investigators discovered. "This is concerning because as a general population the amount of sleep we are getting has decreased over the last 20 years," said lead researcher Dr. Ciaran McMullan, an instructor in medicine. Americans used to sleep an average of eight hours a night, but now it's about 6.5 hours and decreasing, he said. It's not known whether sleeping longer improves kidney function or reverses damage ... Read more

Related support groups: Insomnia, Sleep Disorders, Fatigue, Renal Failure, Sleep Apnea, Chronic Kidney Disease, Nephropathy, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

Hormone Replacement May Protect Women's Kidneys, Study Suggests

Posted 6 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 – Hormone replacement therapy may be good for a woman's kidneys, a preliminary study suggests. "The risks and benefits of hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women are still an area of active debate, and the effect of hormone replacement therapy on the kidney has shown variable results," said study author Dr. Andrea Kattah of the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. Her study compared nearly 700 older women taking hormone replacements with more than 1,500 who were not. Rates of two indicators of kidney disease – microalbuminuria and decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate – were much lower in the women taking hormone replacements, the study found. Microalbuminuria occurs with higher-than-normal levels of a protein called albumin in urine that could be a sign of kidney damage. After they adjusted for known kidney and heart disease risk factors, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Menopausal Disorders, Renal Failure, Postmenopausal Symptoms, Chronic Kidney Disease, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

Do Taller Patients Fare Worse on Dialysis?

Posted 1 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 – Tallness may be linked with an increased risk for premature death in kidney failure patients on dialysis, a new study suggests. While the researchers only found an association and not a cause-and-effect link, tall people on dialysis appeared to have higher rates of premature death than people in the general population. The risk was higher in men than in women, and among patients with shorter dialysis treatment times, the researchers said. The researchers analyzed data from just over 1 million Americans who began dialysis between 1995 and 2008 and were followed for up to five years. Being tall was associated with increased risk of premature death among dialysis patients who were American Indian/Alaska natives, Asians and whites, but this was not the case among black patients in the study. Tall black dialysis patients' risk of premature death was the same as in ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetic Kidney Disease, Diabetic Nephropathy, Hemodialysis, Anemia Associated with Chronic Renal Failure, Anuria, Hemodialysis Anticoagulation, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

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