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Dermatologist Offers Advice on Treating Kids' Hives

Posted 20 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, July 18, 2015 – If your child develops an itchy rash, it could be hives, experts say. Common symptoms of hives – which are usually temporary and harmless – include: slightly raised, pink or red areas on the skin; welts that occur alone, in a group, or that connect over a large area; and skin swelling, according to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). Hives can be triggered by a wide variety of things, including allergic reactions to food or medication, infections, exercise, stress, cold temperatures, insect bites and stings, pollen, sun exposure and scratching the skin. "The best remedy for hives is to try to avoid whatever triggers them, although identifying this is often difficult," Dr. Bruce Brod, a clinical professor of dermatology at University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, said in an AAD news release. "One way to help identify your triggers is to keep a log ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine, Periactin, Xyzal

Unapproved Ear Drops Targeted by FDA

Posted 1 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 – The prescription drops your child is using for ear pain could be among 16 unapproved medications targeted this week by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. These drugs, prescribed and sold for years to relieve ear pain and swelling, have not been evaluated for safety, quality and effectiveness, the agency said Wednesday. The agency notified the drugs' makers to stop marketing the drops following a few reports of local allergic reactions of the ear, eye, face, neck and mouth. The drops can also cause itching, stinging, burning and irritation of the ear, according to an FDA news release. "If we don't know whether these drugs have any benefits, we should not accept any possible risk of side effects," said the FDA's Dr. Charles Lee in the news release. The FDA did not release the names of the companies or the medications involved, but did note that "unapproved ... Read more

Related support groups: Otitis Media, Maintain, Orajel, Benzocaine, Anbesol, Pramoxine, Anusol, Vagisil, Allergen, Caladryl, Lanacane, Antipyrine/Benzocaine, Zilactin Toothache, Hydrocortisone/Pramoxine, Galzin, Analpram-HC, Dendracin, Caladryl Clear, Otitis Externa, Solarcaine

Use of Low-Dose Steroid Creams During Pregnancy Won't Affect Baby: Study

Posted 4 Sep 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 4 – Women who apply prescription steroid creams such as cortisone to ease a medical issue during pregnancy should not worry that the medication will affect their baby, a new study finds. "Cortisone [creams] can be a very powerful drug for a pregnant woman suffering from a variety of conditions both related and unrelated to pregnancy," noted one expert, Dr. Doris Day, a dermatologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "In many cases, there are no substitutes that will relieve the itch and suffering of the conditions, which without proper treatment with cortisone are not only miserable to tolerate but can also lead to permanent scarring," said Day, who was not connected to the new study. Reassuringly, the researchers found that use of corticosteroid gels or creams during pregnancy is not linked to an increased risk for certain complications, including premature ... Read more

Related support groups: Clobetasol, Fluocinonide, Clobex, Desonide, Kenalog, Desoximetasone, Elocon, Topicort, Lidex, Cordran, Halog, Cordran Tape, Olux, Cloderm, Cortizone-10, Halobetasol, Betnovate, Locoid, Beta-Val, Vanos

Kids With Psoriasis Get Inconsistent Care

Posted 21 Sep 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 – How children are treated for psoriasis may depend on whether they see a pediatrician, dermatologist or internist, a new study suggests. About 1 percent of children from birth to age 18 are affected by psoriasis, a skin condition that can lead to patches of itchy, flaky, dry skin. Researchers from University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine and colleagues examined records from physicians on their pediatric psoriasis patients who scheduled visits over the course of nearly three decades. Of 3.8 million visits, about 63 percent of kids saw a dermatologist; 17 percent saw a pediatrician; and 14 percent went to an internist. Researchers found that pediatricians, dermatologists and internists often take different approaches to how they treat children with psoriasis, including what types of medication they use and how strong it is. "Management of psoriasis ... Read more

Related support groups: Psoriasis, Clobetasol, Fluocinonide, Clobex, Desonide, Kenalog, Desoximetasone, Elocon, Topicort, Lidex, Protopic, Cordran, Halog, Cordran Tape, Cloderm, Olux, Cortizone-10, Betnovate, Vanos, Halobetasol

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