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Primary Nocturnal Enuresis News

Could Nasal Spray Curtail Nighttime Bathroom Trips?

Posted 8 May 2016 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, May 8, 2016 – Countless people – often men with enlarged prostates – need to visit the bathroom during the night. But help could soon be at hand in the form of a nasal spray, new research suggests. A spritz of a synthetic hormone, already used by bed-wetting kids, might benefit older people struggling with the problem called nocturia. "Nocturia is very common in patients over 50 years old, and can cause significant problems by causing loss of sleep, and injury due to falls," said study lead author Dr. Jed Kaminetsky. The millions of people with nocturia wake up two or more times a night to urinate. Besides an enlarged prostate, Kaminetsky said, common causes are bladder problems, poor circulation and obesity. Kaminetsky is a clinical assistant professor of urology at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. In the United States there's no approved drug to treat the ... Read more

Related support groups: Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH), Prostatitis, DDAVP, Desmopressin, Minirin, Primary Nocturnal Enuresis, DDAVP Nasal, DDAVP Rhinal Tube, Stimate, Nocturnal Polyuria, Prostate Tumor - Benign

New Prostate Technique May Help Men's Nighttime Urination

Posted 4 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 4, 2016 – Waking often in the night to urinate is a common problem among men who have an enlarged prostate, but an innovative new treatment has shown some promise in easing the problem, researchers are reporting. The procedure, called prostatic artery embolization (PAE), involves placing microscopic spheres in the arteries that supply blood to the prostate gland to partially block the blood flow. Reducing blood flow to the prostate causes the gland to soften and shrink, said lead researcher Dr. Sandeep Bagla, an interventional radiologist at the Vascular Institute of Virginia, in Woodbridge. In their new study, Bagla and his colleagues show that PAE improves symptoms in men suffering from nocturia – waking up repeatedly during the night to urinate. "Their urinary symptoms bothered them considerably less, and their quality of life also showed marked improvement," Bagla ... Read more

Related support groups: Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH), Overactive Bladder, Urinary Incontinence, Prostatitis, Urinary Retention, Primary Nocturnal Enuresis, Prostate Tumor - Benign

Simple Strategies Aren't Always Enough for Bedwetting

Posted 27 Aug 2013 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 27 – While techniques such as fluid restriction can help some children who have problems with bedwetting, alarms and medications are more effective, a new study finds. "Simple behavioral therapies such as rewarding the child for dry nights or taking the child to the toilet during the night can sometimes help with bedwetting, and is better than doing nothing," said study leader Dr. Patrina Caldwell, a pediatrician at the Children's Hospital at Westmead and senior lecturer at the University of Sydney, in Australia. "However, there are more effective treatments such as bedwetting alarm training or medications," she said. But alarm training is more difficult, she noted. Bedwetting affects about 5 million children in the United States, with up to 20 percent of 5-year-olds having the problem. Most kids outgrow the problem, known medically as nocturnal enuresis, and only 2 ... Read more

Related support groups: Imipramine, DDAVP, Desmopressin, Tofranil, Minirin, Primary Nocturnal Enuresis, DDAVP Nasal, DDAVP Rhinal Tube, Stimate, Tofranil-PM

Constipation May Help Explain Some Bedwetting

Posted 6 Feb 2012 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 6 – Constipation is often the cause of bedwetting in children, a small, new study suggests. Failure to diagnose constipation as the cause of bedwetting can lead parents and children on an unnecessarily long, costly and difficult effort to cure nighttime wetting, the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center researchers said. They found that 30 children and adolescents, aged 5 to 15, who sought treatment for bedwetting had large amounts of stool in their rectums, even though most of them had normal bowel habits. Laxative therapy cured 25 (83 percent) of the children of bedwetting within three months. The study appeared recently online in the journal Urology. "Having too much stool in the rectum reduces bladder capacity," study author Dr. Steve Hodges, an assistant professor of urology, explained in a Wake Forest news release. "Our study showed that a large percentage of these ... Read more

Related support groups: Constipation, Primary Nocturnal Enuresis

Health Tip: When It's Time to Call the Doctor About Bedwetting

Posted 3 Jan 2012 by Drugs.com

-- Most cases of bedwetting aren't something to worry about, experts say, but occasionally they can represent a medical problem. The Nemours Foundation says you should call a pediatrician about bedwetting if: It suddenly occurs after six months of dry nights. A child wets his/her pants during the day. Behavioral problems start suddenly at home or school. The child needs to urinate frequently, or complains of burning or pain during urination. The child suddenly has increased appetite or increased thirst. Swelling suddenly develops near the ankles or feet. Bedwetting persists after the child's seventh birthday. Read more

Related support groups: Primary Nocturnal Enuresis

Health Tip: Children and Bedwetting

Posted 24 Oct 2011 by Drugs.com

-- Millions of children wet the bed, especially those who have just been potty trained. Most the time, the child simply grows out of it. The Nemours Foundation offers these suggestions on what to do when a child wets the bed: Be supportive and positive, and assure your child that there's nothing to be embarrassed about. Have your child go to the bathroom one last time right before bed each night. Offer plenty of fluids during the day, but cut back at night. Avoid giving your child any beverages that contain caffeine. Consider waking the child during the night for a bathroom break. Offer a motivational reward and plenty of praise when your child wakes up dry. Read more

Related support groups: Primary Nocturnal Enuresis

Tonsil Removal Might Cure Bedwetting in Some Kids With Sleep Apnea

Posted 16 May 2011 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 16 – Half of children with sleep apnea who also wet the bed might stop their bedwetting if their tonsils or adenoids are removed, new research suggests. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is marked by interruptions in breathing while asleep; it is common among children with enlarged tonsils or adenoids. Exactly how sleep apnea results in bedwetting is not fully understood, but hormonal changes may play a role. However, half of the 417 children in this latest study who had sleep apnea and were bedwetters stopped wetting the bed after they had their tonsils or adenoids removed. Children in the study were aged 5 to 18, and were followed for just under one year after their surgery, on average. Those who did not stop wetting the bed after the surgery were more likely to be born prematurely, be male, be obese or have a family history of bedwetting, the investigators noted. Premature ... Read more

Related support groups: Primary Nocturnal Enuresis

FDA Medwatch Alert: Desmopressin Acetate (marketed as DDAVP Nasal Spray, DDAVP Rhinal Tube, DDAVP, DDVP, Minirin, and Stimate Nasal Spray)

Posted 4 Dec 2007 by Drugs.com

[Posted 12/04/2007] FDA notified healthcare professionals and patients of the Agency's request that manufacturers update the prescribing information for desmopressin to include important new safety information about severe hyponatremia and seizures. Certain patients, including children treated with the intranasal formulation of the drug for primary nocturnal enuresis (PNE), are at risk for developing severe hyponatremia that can result in seizures and death. As such, desmopressin intranasal formulations are no longer indicated for the treatment of primary nocturnal enuresis and should not be used in hyponatremic patients or patients with a history of hyponatremia. PNE treatment with desmopressin tablets should be interrupted during acute illnesses that may lead to fluid and/or electrolyte imbalance. All desmopressin formulations should be used cautiously in patients at risk for water ... Read more

Related support groups: DDAVP, Primary Nocturnal Enuresis

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Enuresis

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nortriptyline, imipramine, Pamelor, DDAVP, desmopressin, Tofranil, Tofranil-PM, Aventyl HCl