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New Guidelines Issued for Cancer Patients' Post-Treatment Pain

Posted 29 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 – More people are surviving cancer, but many are left with persistent pain after treatment. New guidelines from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recommend that doctors routinely screen for such pain. The guidelines also advise doctors to consider the use of non-traditional treatments for pain. These include hypnosis, meditation and medical marijuana where it's legal. ASCO also cautioned doctors to assess patients' risk for overuse of opioid painkillers. "Many oncologists and primary care physicians are not trained to recognize or treat long-term pain associated with cancer," guideline panel co-chair Judith Paice said in an ASCO news release. "This guideline will help clinicians identify pain early and develop comprehensive treatment plans, using a broad range of approaches," she said. Advances in cancer diagnosis and treatment have led to a record ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, Cancer, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Tylenol, Chronic Pain, Opana, Ibuprofen, Subutex

Pain Raises Risk of Opioid Addiction

Posted 22 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 22, 2016 – The more pain they have, the more likely people are to become addicted to powerful prescription opioid painkillers, a new study suggests. "In light of the national opioid abuse epidemic, these new results underscore the importance of developing effective ... approaches to managing common painful medical conditions," said senior author Dr. Mark Olfson. He is a professor of psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City. The study included results from a survey on alcohol and drug use. More than 34,000 Americans completed the survey. The researchers found that people with moderate to severe pain had a 41 percent higher risk of opioid addiction than those with no pain. That increased risk was independent of other factors such as age, gender, anxiety and mood disorders, and family history of drug, alcohol, and behavioral problems, the study ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Opiate Dependence, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opiate Withdrawal, Tylenol, Chronic Pain, Opana

Got Unused Meds? Here's What to Do

Posted 3 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 – While doing your spring cleaning, don't just toss out expired or unused prescription medications. Unwanted drugs need to be properly disposed of to reduce the risk of abuse or accidental use, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. Follow disposal instructions on the drug label or patient information that came with the medicine. Don't put medicines down the sink or flush them down the toilet unless this information specifically says to do so. Call local law enforcement agencies to find out if your community has a medication take-back program or event. Or, ask your local trash or recycling services about medication disposal services and guidelines, the FDA suggests. Another option is to deliver unused medicines to collectors registered with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). These authorized sites may be retail, clinic or hospital pharmacies, and ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Plan B, Oxycodone, Lexapro, Zoloft, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Cymbalta, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Effexor, Prozac, Mirena, Norco, Sprintec, NuvaRing, Fentanyl, Provera

Holiday Luggage Can Be Hazardous to Your Back

Posted 18 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 18 – Heavy luggage may be more than a hassle for holiday travels – those overloaded bags can sometimes cause health problems, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) warns. "Individuals are at high risk for back, neck and shoulder strains when carelessly handling heavy luggage," Dr. Nitin Khanna, an orthopedic surgeon and AAOS spokesperson, said in an academy news release. "Always be cognizant of the way you are lifting heavy luggage to avoid painful injuries," Khanna advised. In 2014, Americans suffered almost 73,000 luggage-related injuries, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. When you shop for new luggage, look for a sturdy, light piece with wheels and a handle, the AAOS said. Pack lightly. If possible, put items in a few smaller bags rather than one large piece of luggage. Never twist your body when carrying or lifting luggage. ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Oxycodone, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Tylenol, Opana, Ibuprofen, Subutex, Naproxen, Dilaudid

How to Clear Snow Without Getting Hurt

Posted 14 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Dec. 13, 2015 – Snow removal is a major cause of winter-related injuries, but there are several ways to reduce your risk, an expert says. "Individuals tend to haste through snow shoveling to avoid being outside in the cold for long periods of time," orthopedic surgeon Dr. Joseph Abboud, spokesman for the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), said in an academy news release. "Unfortunately, rushing through this task can lead to injuries. It should always be done at a slow and steady pace because of the energy and focus that's required. Always check with your doctor before shoveling snow and consider hiring someone to do it for you if you're unable to," he advised. In 2014, more than 203,000 Americans required treatment for injuries suffered while manually clearing snow, and nearly 27,000 were injured using snow blowers or throwers, according to the U.S. Consumer ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Tylenol, Muscle Pain, Opana, Ibuprofen, Subutex

Electrical Stimulation May Ease Low Back Pain for Some

Posted 4 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 4, 2015 – Electrical nerve stimulation may offer some relief for older adults with chronic back pain, a new study suggests. While wearing and activating the "transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation" (TENS) device, people had significant improvement in pain when resting, according to the researchers. The study participants also had a reduction in pain while moving, along with improvement in physical functioning, the researchers said. "TENS is not a new treatment. It's been around 50 years or more," said lead researcher Corey Simon, a postdoctoral researcher, in the University of Florida's Pain Research and Intervention Center in Gainesville. The TENS unit is a small battery-powered machine that delivers low-volt electrical current through electrodes placed on the skin. TENS can be used to treat acute pain, including pain with childbirth, or chronic pain, such as ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Tylenol, Chronic Pain, Opana, Ibuprofen, Subutex

Minority Patients in ER Less Likely to Get Painkillers for Abdominal Pain

Posted 30 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2015 – Minority patients are much less likely than white patients to be given pain medications when they seek emergency department treatment for abdominal pain, a new study shows. Minority patients were also more likely to have longer ER waiting and visit times and less likely to be admitted to the hospital, the study revealed. "These findings add to the overwhelming evidence that racial/ethnic disparities not only exist, but are endemic in health care settings," study co-author Dr. Adil Haider, director of the Center for Surgery and Public Health at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, said in a hospital news release. "Particularly important is the fact that these differences in pain medication use were concentrated in hospitals that treated the largest percentages of minority patients and among those reporting the severest pain, indicating that hospital-level ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Tylenol, Chronic Pain, Opana, Ibuprofen, Subutex, Naproxen

Health Tip: Avoid Back Pain While Feeding Baby

Posted 3 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Back pain is common in new moms, who are frequently carrying a heavy baby. Feeding time, in particular, can lead to a back ache. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons advises: Avoid bending over baby while you nurse. Place a pillow or two on your lap to bring baby up to your level. Instead of a soft couch, opt for an upright chair. When taking baby out or putting baby in a high chair, remove the tray first. Read more

Related support groups: Back Pain, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Acetaminophen, Sciatica, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Aleve, Mobic, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Motrin, Excedrin, Indomethacin, Tylenol PM, Scoliosis, Delivery

Early Physical Therapy Not a Cure-All for Low Back Pain: Study

Posted 13 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 – Early physical therapy provides only modest benefits for low back pain, and the discomfort usually subsides by itself, a new study has found. The study followed more than 200 people with recent-onset low back pain who were randomly assigned to physical therapy or no treatment for the first month after their pain began. Physical therapy included back manipulation and exercise. Early physical therapy produced a modest improvement in the study participants' ability to function after three months, compared with no physical therapy. However, after a year, no significant difference in function was found between the two groups. And, the participants reported no improvement in pain after one month, three months or one year of therapy, the researchers said. "People with lower back pain tend to get better quickly, and the physical therapy helped them get there a little ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Back Pain, Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Acetaminophen, Sciatica, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Aleve, Mobic, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Motrin

How to Dispose of Unused or Expired Prescription Drugs

Posted 25 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 25, 2015 – Many people hold on to extra prescription drugs, but saving old medications is unwise, a pharmacist warns. "Medications that are expired have passed their half-life, which leads to them being ineffective," said Kimberly Cimarelli, pharmacy manager at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, in Hershey, Pa. Expired medications can even be dangerous, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. Their chemical composition can change and, over time, expired drugs may become less effective or potentially harmful. Getting rid of old, unused medications can also help ensure children don't accidentally get their hands on them. Having fewer medications at home can also help prevent mix-ups, the experts pointed out. "Older people who may be easily confused could take the wrong medication because the unwanted or expired medication wasn't disposed of," Officer Rebecca ... Read more

Related support groups: Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Tramadol, OxyContin, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Metoprolol, Tylenol, Opana, Ibuprofen, Subutex, Naproxen, Atenolol, Dilaudid, Meloxicam, Acetaminophen, Opana ER, Diclofenac

Back Pain Patients Seek Pain Relief First, Mobility Second

Posted 21 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 21, 2015 – Pain relief is a greater concern than mobility for people with a common form of lower back pain known as lumbar spinal stenosis, a new study indicates. When asked to choose between a treatment that would reduce discomfort and one that would help them stand and walk, the vast majority of patients wanted to ease their pain, the researchers found. "There has long been a debate in the medical community over striking the right balance between pain relief and physical function," said the study's lead author, Dr. John Markman, director of the Translational Pain Research Program in the University of Rochester Department of Neurosurgery in Rochester, N.Y. "While physicians have leaned toward the need to increase mobility, this study shows that patients have a clear preference for pain relief," Markman said in a university news release. The researchers explained that ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Oxycodone, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Tramadol, OxyContin, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Tylenol, Chronic Pain, Opana, Ibuprofen, Subutex, Naproxen, Dilaudid, Meloxicam, Acetaminophen, Opana ER

Insomniacs May Be More Sensitive to Pain

Posted 12 May 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 – People with insomnia or poor sleep quality may be less tolerant of pain, new research suggests. The more frequent and severe the insomnia, the greater the sensitivity to pain, the Norwegian study showed. Additionally, the researchers noted that people with insomnia who also suffer from chronic pain have an even lower threshold for physical discomfort. It's important to note, however, that while the study found an association between a lack of quality sleep and increased pain sensitivity, it wasn't designed to show a cause-and-effect relationship. The study, led by Borge Sivertsen, of the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in Bergen, involved more than 10,000 adults. The study participants all underwent a standard test of pain sensitivity by dunking their hands in a bath of cold water for 106 seconds. The volunteers were also asked about their sleep quality. ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Headache, Oxycodone, Back Pain, Sleep Disorders, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Insomnia, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Fatigue, Tylenol

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