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Prevention of Sunburn News

U.S. May Still Benefit From Climate Accord

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 15, 2017 – Despite the Trump administration's withdrawal from the Paris Accord on climate change, the United States will benefit from international efforts to slow the global environmental threat, researchers say. Improvements in air quality and health are likely as a result of domestic and global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to a study led by scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. "Our results show that the U.S. can gain significantly greater co-benefits for air quality and human health, especially for ozone, by working together with other countries to combat global climate change," co-lead author Yuqiang Zhang said. The researchers compared how aggressive worldwide action or no action to reduce climate change-causing greenhouse gas emissions would impact air quality and public health in the United States by 2050. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Sunburn, Dehydration, Prevention of Sunburn

Some Guys Can't Stay Away From Tanning Beds

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 – Indoor tanning appears to be more addictive for men than women, even though they use tanning beds less than females, a new study finds. The stereotypical tanning salon client is a young woman, so they are the focus of most research and health warnings about tanning. But the authors behind the new study concluded that anti-tanning efforts should also target men. The findings were "really surprising," said study author Sherry Pagoto, director of the University of Connecticut Center for mHealth and Social Media. "If they tan with the same frequency as women, why would tanning in men be more addictive?" The researchers surveyed more than 600 tanning bed users across the United States. One-third were male. Compared to women, men were more likely to say they felt anxious if they weren't able to tan, that they tanned to relieve stress and that they spent money on ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn

Health Tip: Avoid UV Radiation

Posted 31 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Ultraviolet (UV) radiation coming from the sun is a major cause of skin cancer. The American Cancer Society suggests how to minimize the effects of UV rays: UV rays are strongest between the hours of 10 am and 4 pm. If you must be outside during this time, stay in the shade as much as possible. Always wear sunscreen when you're outside. Cover most parts of your skin with clothing. Wear a hat to protect your head, neck and face. Wear sunglasses that are designed to block UV rays. Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Sunscreen, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn, History - Skin Cancer, Deeptan, Coppertone

Almost 4 in 10 Tanning Salons Flout State Laws

Posted 25 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 25, 2017 – Nearly 40 percent of indoor tanning facilities ignore state laws that curb teen tanning, a new survey finds. To protect teens, most states have laws that prevent or create obstacles to using tanning salons, but nearly 2 million high school kids still get indoor tans, said the researchers who conducted the survey. "The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has classified tanning beds as cancer causing," said the survey's lead researcher, Dr. Erik Stratman, a dermatologist at the Marshfield Clinic in Marshfield, Wis. Indoor tanning is particularly dangerous for young people, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, because it increases their risk for melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer. Banning indoor tanning for teens might prevent thousands of melanomas and melanoma deaths and the millions spent on treatment, Stratman said. "While no ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Sunscreen, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn, History - Skin Cancer, Merkel Cell Carcinoma, Deeptan, Coppertone

Timely Tips for First-Degree Burns

Posted 24 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 24, 2017 – First-degree burns are common and many can be treated at home, a dermatologist says. Unlike second- or third-degree burns, first-degree burns involve only the top layer of skin and often occur after contact with hot surfaces, like a curling iron or a stove. Sunburn can also be a first-degree burn. A first-degree burn may cause red and painful skin and mild swelling. "Although first-degree burns aren't as serious as higher-degree burns, they can hurt quite a bit and can leave a scar if not properly treated," Dr. Darrell Rigel, a clinical professor of dermatology at New York University, said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. Rigel offered tips on how to treat the burn. Cool it by immediately immersing the burn site in cool tap water or by applying cold, wet compresses. Continue for about 10 minutes or until the pain eases. Apply petroleum jelly ... Read more

Related support groups: Sunburn, Sunscreen, Burns - External, Prevention of Sunburn, Deeptan, Coppertone

Start Skin Cancer Prevention Early, Health Experts Say

Posted 10 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 10, 2017 – How to keep from developing skin cancer should be something all doctors discuss with the parents of their young, fair-skinned patients, suggests the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Those conversations should begin much earlier than previously recommended – starting when a child is just 6 months old, according to new recommendations from the task force. "Providing behavioral counseling to children, their parents and young adults encourages sun-protective behaviors," said Karina Davidson, a U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) member. "These actions – such as using sunscreen, wearing sun-protective clothing and avoiding indoor tanning – can help prevent skin cancer later in life," Davidson explained in a USPSTF news release. She is vice dean at Columbia University Medical Center's departments of medicine, cardiology and psychiatry and director of ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Sunscreen, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn, History - Skin Cancer, Merkel Cell Carcinoma, Deeptan, Coppertone

How Safe and Effective Is Your Sunscreen?

Posted 11 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 11, 2017 – It may be easier than ever to find sunscreen with all the right stuff, but be sure to read the label or you could still get burned. Most sunscreens sold at major U.S. retailers and their websites now offer broad-spectrum protection, are water-resistant and have an SPF (sun protection factor) of 30 or higher as the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) recommends, a new study found. But more than a third of sunscreens sold by several of the nation's largest retailers fell short. Forty-one percent of sunscreens did not meet all three recommendations, researchers from the University of Miami and University of Michigan reported. Tanning and bronzing products, in particular, tended to be lacking, the researchers said. In a follow-up to a 2014 study, the researchers checked more than 470 sunscreens available at big pharmacy websites to see if they met the AAD ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Sunscreen, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn, History - Skin Cancer, Merkel Cell Carcinoma, Deeptan, Coppertone

Health Tip: Don't Use Sunscreen on Newborns

Posted 7 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Applying sunscreen on infants aged 6 months and younger isn't a good idea, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. Chemicals used in sunscreen can harm newborns, who should avoid the sun altogether. Young babies can't regulate body temperature properly, making them especially prone to overheating and dehydration, the agency says. The FDA recommends: Keep infants out of the sun as much as possible. If infants do go outside, avoid the sun when ultraviolet rays are strongest, between the hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Create a canopy over baby's carrier or stroller. Dress baby in lightweight, tight-weave long pants; a long-sleeve shirt and wide-brimmed hat. Watch baby carefully for signs of overheating and dehydration. Give baby breast milk or formula regularly. If baby develops a sunburn, get out of the sun immediately and apply a cold compress as soon as possible. Read more

Related support groups: Sunburn, Dehydration, Sunscreen, Prevention of Sunburn, Heat Stress, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Deeptan, Coppertone

Melanoma Isn't the Only Serious Skin Cancer

Posted 27 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 27, 2017 – A type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is increasingly common in the United States, so people need to be alert for signs of the disease, an expert says. About 700,000 new cases of this skin cancer are diagnosed in the United States each year, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. "While other skin cancers may be more lethal, they're less common than squamous cell carcinoma," said Dr. M. Laurin Council, an assistant professor of dermatology at Washington University in St. Louis. This type of cancer is highly treatable when detected early, "so it's important for people to know the signs of this disease and keep a close eye on their skin," Council added in a news release from the American Academy of Dermatology. Possible signs of squamous cell carcinoma include a pink or white bump; a rough, scaly patch; or a sore that won't heal, ... Read more

Related support groups: Sunburn, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Sunscreen, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn, History - Skin Cancer, Coppertone, Deeptan

Health Tip: Getting Too Much Sun?

Posted 19 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Applying sunscreen liberally and often helps protect you from a nasty burn and damage to your skin. The American Academy of Family Physicians says failure to use sunscreen can lead to: Changes in your skin, including moles and freckles that may turn into skin cancer. Premature aging of your skin, including emergence of dark spots, a leathery appearance and wrinkles. A weaker immune system caused by your body's response to burned skin. Damage to the eyes. Increased risk of skin cancer. Read more

Related support groups: Sunburn, Sunscreen, Prevention of Sunburn, Coppertone, Deeptan

Health Tip: Protect Your Eyes During Summer

Posted 18 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

-- To prevent skin damage, you apply sunscreen. But how can you protect your eyes from the summer sun's glaring rays? The American Academy of Ophthalmology advises: Wear sunglasses that block ultraviolet (UV) light. Look for glasses labeled as "100% UV protection." Styles that wrap around your head may offer added protection. Wear a hat with a wide-brim. Keep yourself and your kids out of direct sunlight during peak local hours of 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Your eyes always need dalight protection – even on cloudy days and during winter. Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Sunscreen, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn, History - Skin Cancer, Merkel Cell Carcinoma, Coppertone, Deeptan

Some Medicines Boost Sensitivity to Sun

Posted 17 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 17, 2017 – It's well-known that too much time in the sun puts your skin at risk. But it's extra important to limit sun exposure when you're taking certain prescription medications, a pharmaceutical expert warns. Drug-induced photosensitivity is similar to intense sunburns. It causes severe pain, skin peeling and blistering. People taking certain antibiotics and antidepressants are most at risk, said Cesar Munoz, clinical pharmacy manager in ambulatory care services at Harris Health System in the Houston area. Even some over-the-counter medications can cause photosensitivity, so be sure to read the label of any medication you take. The Skin Cancer Foundation warns that pain-relievers – such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve) – can cause photosensitivity. The degree of skin reaction depends on several factors, such as drug strength and amount of sun ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Amitriptyline, Doxycycline, Naproxen, Cipro, Ciprofloxacin, Nortriptyline, Advil, Levaquin, Aleve, Elavil, Motrin, Minocycline, Levofloxacin, Doxepin, Tetracycline, Imipramine, Avelox, Sunburn, Clomipramine

Smart Steps for Sun Protection

Posted 17 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 17, 2017 – You know you're supposed to slather on a high-SPF sunscreen before going out in the sun, but these five steps will help you double up on that protection. First, it's important to know that there are two types of harmful ultraviolet rays. UVA rays cause lasting skin damage and aging. UVB rays cause sunburn along with skin damage. Both can lead to skin cancer, so your sunscreen should protect against both. Look for the word "broad-spectrum" on the label. Next, you want to check out the ingredients. Sun protection products may contain chemical and/or physical sunscreens. Most products use chemical sunscreens, like oxybenzone, that absorb damaging UV rays. Zinc oxide and titanium dioxide are physical sunscreens. They sit on the skin and reflect and diffuse UV rays. They also work right away, unlike chemical sunscreens – it can take 30 minutes before they're ... Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Sunscreen, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Prevention of Sunburn, History - Skin Cancer, Merkel Cell Carcinoma, Deeptan, Coppertone

4 Ways to Look Younger Longer

Posted 14 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 14, 2017 – There's no escaping the fact that there'll be another birthday candle on your cake this year, but that doesn't mean your skin has to give away your age. These four steps can help stop the wrinkles – and you're never too young to start. The main culprit behind aging skin is the sun's ultraviolet rays, including UVAs that penetrate your skin and damage collagen fibers. That sets off a chain reaction that leads to wrinkles. The best way to prevent this damage, called photoaging, is by using at least SPF 15 sunscreen every day, even when you're just going to work or running errands. Many daywear cosmetics contain SPF, but if yours don't, apply sunscreen, wait 15 minutes, and then put on your makeup. But keep in mind that wearing sunscreen doesn't give you license to bake in the sun. The skin around your eyes is particularly fragile, so be sure to wear sunglasses, ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Sunburn, Facial Wrinkles, Alcoholism, Hangover, Sunscreen, Prevention of Sunburn, Facial Lipoatrophy, Coppertone, Acute Alcohol Intoxication, Deeptan

Cancer Deaths Higher in Rural America, CDC Reports

Posted 6 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 – Cancer death rates are declining overall in the United States, but they are higher and falling more slowly in rural America, a new federal government report shows. "While geography alone can't predict your risk of cancer, it can impact prevention, diagnosis and treatment opportunities – and that's a significant public health problem in the U.S.," said Dr. Anne Schuchat, acting director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The report, published July 6, is the first to detail cancer differences and death rates in urban and rural America. Part of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, it found: Cancer death rates were higher in rural areas – 180 deaths for every 100,000 people, compared to 158 per 100,000 in urban areas. Cancer death rates fell 1 percent a year in rural America, compared with 1.6 percent in urban areas. Overall ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Sunburn, Human Papilloma Virus, Skin Cancer, Cervical Dysplasia, Hepatitis B Prevention, Prevention of Sunburn, Vaccination and Prophlaxis, Hepatitis B Prophylaxis, History - Skin Cancer

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sunscreen, zinc oxide, Coppertone, Deeptan