Skip to Content

Join the 'Prevention of Poison Ivy' group to help and get support from people like you.

Prevention of Poison Ivy News

4 Ways to Protect Yourself Against Poison Ivy, Oak and Sumac

Posted 11 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 11, 2016 – When you're enjoying the great outdoors, be on the lookout for poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac. The urushiol oil in their sap can cause itching, a red rash and blisters. These symptoms can appear from a few hours to several days after exposure, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Learn what these plants look like so you can avoid them. The old saying "Leaves of three, let it be" is a helpful reminder for poison ivy and poison oak. But it's not foolproof – the form may vary depending on the type of plant you encounter. Poison sumac, meanwhile, usually has clusters of 7 to 13 leaves, according to the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. If you're working in areas with these plants, wear long sleeves, long pants tucked into boots and impermeable gloves. Wash garden tools and gloves regularly. Wash pets if they may ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Clobetasol, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fluocinonide, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine

Straight Talk About Poison Ivy

Posted 10 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 10, 2015 – Reports that poison ivy has gotten bigger, stronger or more prevalent are misleading, one dermatologist says. "I think people are just out more, and so they're coming into contact with it more," Dr. David Adams, a dermatologist at Penn State Hershey Hospital, said in a hospital news release. Up to 75 percent of people will develop the itchy red rash if exposed to the urushiol oil inside the plant's leaves, stem and roots. The idea that you can get the rash by just brushing against the leaves of a poison ivy plant is a common misconception, Adams noted. "You have to actually break the leaves, stem or root to get the urushiol oil on you," he said. Poison ivy is also not usually passed from one person to another. Mild cases can often be treated with over-the-counter cortisone cream or calamine lotion, but more serious reactions may need prescription creams or a ... Read more

Related support groups: Prevention of Poison Ivy

Health Tip: Treating Poison Ivy

Posted 25 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

-- If you've been exposed to poison ivy, a few suggestions can help ease the itch, prevent the rash's spread and reduce your risk of skin infection. The American Academy of Dermatology suggests: Immediately after possible exposure, use soap and lukewarm water to wash the skin. Avoid scrubbing areas already laden with a poison ivy rash. Remove all clothing that could have touched the plant, and wash immediately. Use lukewarm soapy water to wash anything that may have touched the plant, including gardening tools, golf clubs, pet fur or pet leashes. Don't scratch the area, since doing so could lead to a skin infection. Don't rub or remove peeling skin. Soothe itchy skin with a short, lukewarm bath in colloidal oatmeal or baking soda. Then apply calamine lotion or hydrocortisone to help ease itching. Use a cool compress to soothe itchy skin, or take an oral antihistamine. Read more

Related support groups: Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Clobetasol, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fluocinonide, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine, Clobex, Xyzal

Poison Ivy's Gonna Get Ya...

Posted 7 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, June 6, 2015 – Poison ivy, oak and sumac are common outdoor hazards, but there are a number of ways to prevent exposure and reduce your suffering if you do come into contact with these plants, an expert says. "Millions of Americans every year develop an allergic rash after being exposed, and these poisonous plants are pretty much everywhere in the United States except Alaska and Hawaii," Renee Miller, from the Tennessee Poison Center at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, said in center news release. Oils in the plants' leaves, roots and vines get into the skin almost immediately after contact and bind with proteins, causing an immune system reaction that leads to extreme itchiness. "If there's a risk for exposure, wear long pants, long sleeves, gloves and boots," Miller said. But she noted that rubber gloves won't protect you because the plant oils are soluble in rubber ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Clobetasol, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fluocinonide, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine, Clobex

Ask a Question