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Prematurity / Underweight in Infancy News

Health Tip: Pregnant Women Need Omega-3 Fats

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Omega-3 fatty acids, such as those found in fatty fish, are an essential part of a healthy diet during pregnancy. Opt for these safer sources, recommends the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Choose fish that are low in mercury, such as salmon, catfish, cod and sardines. Avoid fish that are high in mercury, such as swordfish and shark. Eat foods fortified with DHA, or if your doctor approves, take a DHA supplement. Eat eggs from hens fed DHA-rich microalgae. Read more

Related support groups: Fish Oil, Lovaza, Omega-3, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Omacor, MaxEPA, Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids, Restora, Animi-3, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Marine Lipid Concentrate, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, EPA Fish Oil, Omega 3-6-9 Complex, Sea-Omega 70, Omtryg, Lactobacillus Casei/omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids, TheraTears Nutrition, Mi-Omega NF, Prenatal DHA

Study: Plenty of IV Fluids May Make Childbirth Safer, Easier

Posted 28 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 27, 2017 – Giving more intravenous (IV) fluids to women during childbirth seems to reduce the risk of cesarean section and shortens labor, researchers report. "The results are compelling and strongly argue for a change in practice," said study author Dr. Vincenzo Berghella, director of maternal fetal medicine at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. "We have already begun changing practice at Jefferson to give women more fluids in labor, to allow them to have the best chance of delivering vaginally," he added in a university news release. "We've known that it's important for women to stay well-hydrated during pregnancy and labor. This study suggests that IV fluids could help women maintain hydration at appropriate levels, reduce the likelihood of C-section, and decrease length of labor," Berghella said. In the study, his team reviewed seven small clinical trials ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Cervical Ripening, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Young Cancer Survivors Can Face Higher Risk of Pregnancy Complications

Posted 23 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 23, 2017 – Surviving a cancer when young may leave some women with another health issue: An increased risk for certain pregnancy complications. That's the conclusion of a new study of more than 15,000 births to teen and young adult women, aged 15 to 39, living in North Carolina. Those who were cancer survivors had a higher risk for preterm birth, cesarean delivery and low birth weight infants, the researchers said. "While we believe these findings are something women should be aware of, we still have a lot of work to do to understand why this risk is becoming apparent, and whether or not the children who are born preterm to these women go on to develop any health concerns," said study author Hazel Nichols. She's an assistant professor in the School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina. One ob/gyn said that, given the effects of cancer treatment, ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Cancer, Female Infertility, Delivery, Ovulation Induction, Premature Labor, Primary Ovarian Failure, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy

For 'Preemies,' Human Touch May Be a Brain Booster

Posted 16 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 – Underscoring the link between brain development and touch, new research suggests premature babies face a disadvantage compared to their full-term peers in their brain's sensitivity to gentle touch. Analyzing 125 preterm and full-term infants, scientists also found that preemies experienced lowered brain response to gentle touch in the aftermath of painful medical procedures. "We all know in our daily lives how important touch is, but for babies ... it's also a scaffold to building their brains," said study author Dr. Nathalie Maitre. She's director of the NICU follow-up clinic at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. "Pain and touch don't go through the same nerves," Maitre added. "We didn't expect how the painful procedures and experience of pain would have an effect on how babies would process gentle touch." About 15 million babies around the ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Tests to Spot 'Preemie' Birth Risk Ineffective in First Pregnancies

Posted 14 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 – Two tests that screen for preterm birth risk rarely spot trouble in first-time pregnancies, a new study suggests. The tests' predictive powers were assessed for naturally occurring preterm deliveries only, and not for medical procedures such as cesarean surgery or induced labor. "These methods of assessing women in their first pregnancy do not identify most of those who will later go on to have a spontaneous preterm delivery," said senior study author Dr. Uma Reddy. She is with the Pregnancy and Perinatology Branch at the U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. "There is a need to develop better screening tests that can be performed early in pregnancy," Reddy said in an institute news release. Preterm birth, defined as a birth before 37 weeks into pregnancy, is the leading cause of neonatal death or long-term disability, according to the ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Diagnosis and Investigation, Cervical Ripening, Cesarean Section, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Can Supplements Ward Off the 'Baby Blues'?

Posted 13 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 13, 2017 – After childbirth, many new moms experience the "baby blues." Now, researchers suggest that just three days of an experimental dietary supplementation may vanquish the temporary sadness. "Women who take the supplement don't get sad" in the early days of motherhood, said Dr. Jeffrey Meyer, co-author of a study testing this blues-banishing regimen. "We also see this as a promising way to try to prevent postpartum depression," said Meyer. He is a professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto and co-creator of the product. Postpartum blues – a milder condition than postpartum depression – is thought to affect about 75 percent of women in the first week after giving birth. It can be considered a "normal phase" marked by anxiety, moodiness and crying, said Dr. Teri Pearlstein, a professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown University. "The symptoms can ... Read more

Related support groups: Postpartum Depression, Delivery, Tryptophan, Premature Labor, Postpartum Bleeding, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Tryptan, Aminomine, L-Tyrosine, Tyrosine

Health Tip: Washing Baby Bottles

Posted 10 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Your baby is already at heightened risk of infection, so why compound the problem with poorly-washed bottles? The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends: Place bottles, caps, nipples and related supplies in a clean sink filled with hot, soapy water. Use a bottle brush to thoroughly wash the inside and outside of each bottle, then rinse under running water. Wash the nipples and rings with a nipple brush, and make sure to squeeze the hot, soapy water through the nipples to wash away trapped milk. Rinse under running water. Remove other bottle accessories using sanitized tongs, rinse them well and let them dry in a dish drainer. Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation

Mildly Low Thyroid Function in Pregnancy Not a Threat: Study

Posted 2 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 1, 2017 – There's no benefit to treating pregnant women who have mildly low thyroid function, researchers report. Very low thyroid function during pregnancy is associated with impaired fetal brain development and increased risk of preterm birth and miscarriage. Some studies have suggested that even mildly low thyroid function (so-called subclinical hypothyroidism) during pregnancy could also pose a threat to a newborn. This new study of more than 97,000 pregnant women across the United States found no evidence of that. Researchers saw no differences in brain development between children born to mothers with low thyroid function who did or did not receive medication during pregnancy. There were also no differences between the groups in rates of preterm birth, stillbirth, miscarriage and gestational diabetes, according to the study, conducted by a U.S. National ... Read more

Related support groups: Levothyroxine, Synthroid, Thyroid Disease, Hypothyroidism, Underactive Thyroid, Levoxyl, Delivery, Levothroid, Eltroxin, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Tirosint, Premature Labor, Euthyrox, Oroxine, Levothyrox, Unithroid, Eutroxsig, Levo-T, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy

Antiviral Flu Drugs Safe in Mid-to-Late Pregnancy: Study

Posted 1 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 1, 2017 – Taking antiviral drugs to prevent or treat flu during pregnancy doesn't appear to put the health of the fetus at risk, a new study finds. Researchers reviewed information from nearly 6,000 pregnant women who were given a prescription for antiviral drugs to treat flu. The prescriptions were for either oseltamivir (Tamiflu) or zanamivir (Relenza). The study didn't include women who took the drugs before 22 weeks of pregnancy. The researchers compared these women to nearly 700,000 expectant mothers who didn't take the drugs during pregnancy. Babies born to mothers prescribed the antiviral drugs didn't have higher rates of complications. The researchers looked at problems such as low birth weight, preterm birth, stillbirth and birth defects. The findings support previous studies showing that these drugs don't put babies at risk, according to study author Dr. ... Read more

Related support groups: Influenza, Tamiflu, Delivery, Swine Influenza, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Oseltamivir, Apnea of Prematurity, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Relenza, Zanamivir, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Influenza with Pneumonia

Little Weight Gain in Pregnancy Tied to Schizophrenia Risk in Kids: Study

Posted 23 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 – Gaining too little weight during pregnancy may increase the odds that a child will develop schizophrenia later in life, Swedish researchers suggest. Past research has shown that pregnant women in areas of famine are more likely to have children who suffer from mental disorders, including schizophrenia. The new study found a 30 percent increased risk for schizophrenia in children of underweight women in an industrialized country. "Even in a wealthy, well-fed population like Sweden, there are still mothers unable to meet the nutritional requirements for safe pregnancies," lead researcher Euan Mackay said. Mackay is a research assistant at the Karolinska Institute's division of epidemiology of mental health in Stockholm. Mackay cautioned that these findings cannot prove that women who don't gain enough weight during pregnancy are putting their child at risk for ... Read more

Related support groups: Seroquel, Abilify, Weight Loss, Schizophrenia, Latuda, Zyprexa, Risperidone, Risperdal, Schizoaffective Disorder, Geodon, Quetiapine, Saphris, Seroquel XR, Olanzapine, Psychosis, Delivery, Invega, Rexulti, Clozapine, Aripiprazole

Kids Born to Older Moms Score Higher on Thinking Tests

Posted 20 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 20, 2017 – Children born to older moms today have better thinking skills than those with younger mothers, a new study suggests. The opposite was true 40 or 50 years ago – a shift researchers say mirrors changing trends in parenting. Women today tend to be older when they have their first child and, on average, first-borns do better on cognitive ability tests, which measure thinking skills. This may be because they get more attention from parents than siblings born after them. "Cognitive ability is important in and of itself but also because it is a strong predictor of how children fare in later life – in terms of their educational attainment, their occupation and their health," said study author Alice Goisis. She is a researcher at the London School of Economics and Political Science. In the past, older moms were likely to be having their third or fourth child, ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Labor Pain, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

'Love Hormone' Helps Dads and Babies Bond

Posted 17 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 17, 2017 – The "love hormone" oxytocin may program fathers to bond with their young children, a new study suggests. "Our findings add to the evidence that fathers, and not just mothers, undergo hormonal changes that are likely to facilitate increased empathy and motivation to care for their children," said study lead author James Rilling of Emory University in Atlanta. Oxytocin is a naturally occurring hormone. MRI brain scans revealed that dads who received boosts of the hormone through a nasal spray had increased activity in brain areas associated with reward and empathy when looking at pictures of their toddlers, Rilling's team said. The findings also "suggest that oxytocin, known to play a role in social bonding, might someday be used to normalize deficits in paternal motivation, such as in men suffering from post-partum depression," Rilling said in a university news ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Postpartum Depression, Delivery, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders, Oxytocin, Premature Labor, Pitocin, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Syntocinon, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy

Lingering Baby Weight? Don't Blame the Pregnancy

Posted 17 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 17, 2017 – Women have long blamed pregnancy for weight gains that linger after their babies are born, but a new study suggests the demands of motherhood might be to blame. "We found that by one or two years after birth, women who had children were very similar [in weight gain] to those who did not," said lead researcher Olga Yakusheva. She is an associate professor of nursing at the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor. However, "from that time on, women with children were gaining weight at a faster rate than women without," she added. Yakusheva has a theory, which wasn't tested or proven in the study, about why. "Mothers tend to put the needs of their children first, so they might not be exercising or taking care of themselves," she said in a statement. "It might also be little things like finishing the food on their child's plate or spending more time sitting with their ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Delivery, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Labor Pain, Lactation Augmentation, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Pregnancy-Linked Diabetes Poses Risks for Mom, Baby

Posted 16 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 16, 2017 – Diabetes that develops during pregnancy – known as gestational diabetes – carries health risks for both the mom-to-be and her baby, new research confirms. A team of French researchers analyzed data from more than 700,000 births in France occurring after 28 weeks of pregnancy in 2012. Compared to other pregnant women, those with gestational diabetes were 30 percent more likely to experience preterm birth, 40 percent more likely to require a C-section, and 70 percent more likely to have preeclampsia/eclampsia, a dangerous spike in blood pressure. Risks weren't confined to the mother, however. Babies born to women with gestational diabetes were 80 percent more likely to be of significantly larger-than-average size at birth; 10 percent more likely to suffer respiratory issues; 30 percent more likely to experience a traumatic birth, and 30 percent more likely to ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Delivery, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Premature Labor, Gestational Diabetes, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy

More 'Extreme Preemies' Are Surviving

Posted 16 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15, 2017 – Babies born very early – between 22 and 24 weeks of pregnancy – are more likely to survive now than a decade or so ago, new research shows. These extremely premature infants are also slightly more likely to avoid serious health complications now. But it's still a rough road for these infants, who often weigh in at less than 2 pounds at birth. Just one in three survive, and many face challenges. In a study that looked at a 12-year span, "survival increased and more infants went on to not have signs of developmental delay when tested around age 2," said lead author Dr. Noelle Younge. She's a neonatologist and assistant professor of pediatrics at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, N.C. Yet much progress remains to be made, Younge acknowledged. Her research team reviewed the records of more than 4,200 infants born at 22 to 24 weeks of pregnancy, ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

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