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Prematurity / Underweight in Infancy News

Could Low Vitamin D Levels at Birth Mean Higher MS Risk?

Posted 2 days 19 hours ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 1, 2016 – Newborns with low levels of vitamin D may have higher odds of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) later in life, new research suggests. Vitamin D deficiency is common among the general population, including pregnant women. But the researchers said it's too soon to routinely recommend "sunshine vitamin" supplements for mothers-to-be. "The study does not prove that increasing vitamin D levels reduces the risk of MS. Further studies are needed to confirm our results," said study leader Dr. Nete Munk Nielsen, a researcher at the Statens Serum Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark. About 2.5 million people worldwide have MS. It's a chronic disease of the central nervous system characterized by damage to myelin, the fatty substance coating nerve fibers. MS symptoms vary, but can include walking difficulties, fatigue, numbness and vision problems. A growing body of evidence ... Read more

Related support groups: Multiple Sclerosis, Vitamin D Deficiency, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Chronic Spasticity, Caltrate 600 with D, Vitamin D Insufficiency, Spasticity, Calcium/Vitamin D, Upper Limb Spasticity, Citracal + D, Citracal Petites, Oysco 500 with D, Calcet, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Calcium 600 D, Calcarb with D, Lower Limb Spasticity, Spinal Spasticity

Do Women Who Have Kids Later Live Longer?

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 – In what's believed to be the first study of its kind, research suggests that women who give birth for the first time at age 25 or older are more likely to live to 90. The researchers also found that women who survived to 90 were more likely to be college graduates, married and have a higher income. "Our study results don't suggest women should delay childbearing, because it's not clearly known why the results suggest [the link to] longevity," said study author Aladdin Shadyab. He's a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. "Also, a likely explanation is that women who have a child at an older age are usually of higher social and economic status," Shadyab added. "We know from [prior] research that these people are also likely to live longer." While the average American woman giving birth for the first time today is ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Premature Calcium Deposits May Trigger Premature Births: Study

Posted 9 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 9, 2016 – A new potential risk factor for premature birth has been identified. Ten percent of infants are born prematurely (before 37 weeks of pregnancy), and many suffer long-term health problems. Knowing why preterm births occur might help prevent them, researchers said. A team at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, found that calcium deposits in the membrane surrounding the fetus can form early and may cause a mother's water to break too soon. The deposits, early markers of bone, make the membrane less elastic. The same kind of deposits have also been implicated in kidney stones and hardening of the arteries. But the new study did not prove that these early calcium deposits cause premature birth. "We do see calcium deposits in full term births as well, which is probably part of the normal breakdown of the membranes at the appropriate time," study senior ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Calcium Oxalate Calculi with Hyperuricosuria, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Health Tip: Safer Sleep for Baby

Posted 8 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Exactly what do worried parents need to do to keep baby safer while the infant is asleep? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends: Always put baby to sleep on the back, until baby turns a year old. If baby rolls over, you don't need to keep flipping the infant back. Just keep the crib clear of any objects, including pillows, bumper pads, toys and blankets. If baby falls asleep in a swing, or car seat, transfer baby to the crib as soon as possible. Make sure baby's crib mattress is firm. Don't let baby sleep in your bed. But for at least the first six months, put baby's crib in your bedroom. Never let baby sleep on a couch or chair. If you swaddle baby, make sure it's not too tight. Stop swaddling when baby tries to roll over. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Be Alert for PTSD After Pregnancy Loss

Posted 2 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2, 2016 – Post-traumatic stress disorder can develop in women after pregnancy loss, a new British study finds. Women who suffer a miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy should be routinely screened for PTSD and receive mental health support, the researchers said. "We were surprised at the high number of women who experienced symptoms of PTSD after early pregnancy loss," said study lead author Jessica Farren, of the department of surgery and cancer at Imperial College London. "At the moment, there is no routine follow-up appointment for women who have suffered a miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy," Farren said. "We have checks in place for [postpartum] depression, but we don't have anything in place for the trauma and depression following pregnancy loss," she said in a college news release. PTSD causes people to relive frightening or distressing events through nightmares, ... Read more

Related support groups: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Delivery, Premature Labor, Postpartum Bleeding, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

U.S. Premature Births Rise for 1st Time in 8 Years

Posted 1 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 1, 2016 – The rate of premature births in the United States increased in 2015 for the first time in eight years, and rates are especially high among certain racial and ethnic groups, a March of Dimes report says. The overall rate rose from 9.57 percent to 9.63 percent, according to data from the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. Rates in 2015 were nearly 48 percent higher for black women and more than 15 percent higher for American Indian/Alaska Native women compared to white women, according to the report. The findings led the March of Dimes to give the United States a "C" grade on its latest Premature Birth Report Card. The report card "demonstrates that there is an unfair burden of premature birth among specific racial and ethnic groups as well as geographic areas," said Dr. Jennifer Howse, president of the March of Dimes. "The March of Dimes strives for a ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Every Day in the Womb Boosts Babies' Brain Development: Study

Posted 31 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 – Carrying a baby as close to full term as possible is better for the baby's brain development, a new study suggests. "What this study shows us is that every day and every week of in utero development is critical," said study senior author Catherine Limperopoulos. She directs the Developing Brain Research Laboratory at Children's National Health System in Washington, D.C. "If at all possible, we need to keep fetuses in utero to protect them from the hazards that can occur in the extra uterine environment," she said in a hospital system news release. The researchers said that during the third trimester of pregnancy, the fetal brain grows exponentially. The brain increases fourfold in size during this time, the researchers added. The study included 75 preterm infants born before 32 weeks of pregnancy. The mean gestational age was 27 weeks. These babies weighed less ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Birthing Pool Not the Place to Deliver, New Guidelines Say

Posted 25 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 – While a birthing pool during the early stages of labor may offer some advantages, women should not deliver their baby in the water, new guidelines advise. Birthing pools can be found in hospitals, birthing centers or at home. A woman in labor lies in a tub of warm water to help ease delivery. "Immersion in water during the first stage of labor may offer some benefits: It may shorten labor and is associated with a decreased use of epidurals [injecting anesthesia into the spine]," said Dr. Joseph Wax. He chaired the committee that developed the recommendations for the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). "However, it is important to differentiate between laboring in water and delivering in water," Wax said in an ACOG news release. "There is no evidence to support delivering a baby in water has benefits to the baby." In fact, according to ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Postpartum Bleeding, Labor Pain, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Doctors Should Promote Breast-Feeding to Patients: Panel

Posted 25 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 – Doctors should provide breast-feeding support and guidance to new mothers and pregnant women, an expert panel says. This includes education about the benefits of breast-feeding, encouragement and practical help on how to breast-feed, according to the new U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation. Primary care providers should help women make an informed choice about breast-feeding, the panel said. "Breast-feeding has real health benefits for babies and their mothers. Primary care clinicians can help new moms who breast-feed be successful," said task force member Ann Kurth, dean of the Yale School of Nursing in New Haven, Conn. "Primary care interventions to support breast-feeding are effective in increasing both the number of mothers who breast-feed and how long they breast-feed their babies," she added in a task force news release. Breast-feeding ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Lactation Suppression, Lactation Augmentation, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Infants Should Share Parents' Room to Help Prevent SIDS

Posted 24 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 – Infants should sleep in the same room as their parents – but not in the same bed – to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics advise. The recommendations call for babies to share their parents' bedroom for at least the first 6 months of life and, ideally, for the first year. This could reduce the risk of sudden death by as much as 50 percent, the guideline authors say. "Room sharing makes a lot of sense," said Dr. Paul Jarris, deputy medical officer at the March of Dimes. The rationale is that having the infant within view and reach makes for easier monitoring, comforting and feeding. Because the baby is nearby, parents might notice any potential difficulty, Jarris said. "If we look at how strong the evidence is, parents will be well advised to adopt room sharing," Jarris said. It's ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Having Baby Too Soon After Weight-Loss Surgery May Raise Risks

Posted 19 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 – Infants born to mothers who've had weight-loss surgery have a higher risk for complications, and the risks are greatest for those born within two years of the surgery, a new study finds. "A recently postoperative mother with underlying nutritional, metabolic, and physiological changes is at an elevated risk for perinatal complications," concluded a team led by Dr. Brodie Parent, of the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle. One obstetrician who reviewed the findings said the issue is arising more frequently as bariatric (weight-loss) surgeries surge in popularity. "I have been acutely aware of the recent increase in patients who have had bariatric procedures," said Dr. Brian McKennna, who directs gynecology at Northwell Health's Southside Hospital in Bay Shore, N.Y. "Many of these patients have had serious nutritional deficits even before their ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Delivery, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Expecting Twins or Triplets? What You Should Know Before They Arrive

Posted 18 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 – The number of U.S. couples expecting twins or even triplets is on the rise, and these parents will have their hands full. Fortunately, there are many ways to prepare ahead of time, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Keep in mind that "multiples" are often born early and tend to be smaller than the average newborn. The AAP says parents may need to visit with their pediatrician more often than usual and reach out for help with feeding concerns or strategies. Two or three newborns also use double or triple the number of diapers. But having multiples also means fitting more safety seats into the car, more clothing, more food and possibly even a larger home, the academy pointed out in a news release. Multiples may share everything, but they are individuals and should be raised as such, the AAP advises. Identical twins, in particular, may seem like ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Protein in Breast Milk May Reduce Hospital Infections in Preemies

Posted 14 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 – A protein in breast milk helps protect premature babies from hospital-acquired infections, according to a new study. "The majority of diseases affecting newborn preemies are hospital-acquired infections such as meningitis, pneumonia and urinary tract infections," said study lead author Dr. Michael Sherman. He is a retired professor of child health at the University of Missouri School of Medicine in Columbia, Mo. "Not only did we find that lactoferrin, a protein found in breast milk, could reduce hospital infections among preemies, but we also measured the safety of feeding the protein to newborns," he said in a university news release. The study included 60 premature infants who were given lactoferrin through a feeding tube twice a day for 28 days, and 60 premature infants who received a placebo. Babies in the lactoferrin group had 50 percent fewer ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Lactation Augmentation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Even Incomplete Steroid Treatment Helps Preemies: Study

Posted 10 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 – Even partial steroid treatment before birth can improve survival odds for extremely premature infants and reduce their risk of certain birth defects, a new study suggests. Steroids are standard therapy for pregnant women likely to give birth before 34 weeks of gestation. But the complete course of treatment takes at least 48 hours and doctors may decide not to begin treatment if premature delivery is imminent, explained researchers funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. But these new findings "suggest that starting steroid treatment promptly – even if the likelihood of completion is low – is beneficial when extremely premature birth is imminent," the researchers said. The investigators analyzed data from more than 6,100 extremely premature infants who were born between 22 and 27 weeks of pregnancy. They were followed for 18 to 22 months after birth. ... Read more

Related support groups: Betamethasone, Delivery, Celestone, Premature Labor, Betamethasone/Clotrimazole, Lotrisone, Taclonex, Beta-Val, Betnovate, Luxiq, Diprosone, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Diprolene, Enstilar, Betaderm, Taclonex Scalp, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Alphatrex, Cell-U-Jec

Prenatal Factors May Raise Child's Risk for OCD

Posted 6 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 – Pregnancy behaviors and certain childbirth complications may influence a child's risk of developing obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), a new study suggests. Cesarean sections, preterm and breech (backward) births, smoking while pregnant, and unusually large or small babies were all associated with increased risk for the mental health disorder, Swedish researchers reported. "The specific causes of OCD are unknown," said lead researcher Gustaf Brander, from the Center for Psychiatry Research at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. "While both genetic and environmental risk factors are thought to be associated with OCD, this is the first time that a set of environmental risk factors is convincingly associated with the condition," Brander said. People with OCD have uncontrollable recurring thoughts they try to deal with by repeating certain behaviors over and ... Read more

Related support groups: Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Smoking, Psychiatric Disorders, Delivery, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

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