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Prematurity / Underweight in Infancy News

Health Tip: Avoid Baby Sleep Positioners

Posted 2 days 5 hours ago by Drugs.com

-- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning parents against the use of baby sleep positioners. While these products may purport to prevent an infant from rolling, the products can lead to suffocation, the FDA says. To help keep baby safe, the agency suggests: Avoid infant sleep positioners of any kind. Do not use pillows, blankets, sheets, or quilts in a crib. Dress babies for the season to stay warm without extra blankets and sheets. Keep cribs bare of objects and toys. Always put baby on his or her back in a crib. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Delivery, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Protecting Preemies From Stress Might Improve Later Mental Health

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 5, 2017 – Being born at an extremely low birth weight seems to increase the risk for developing mental health issues as an adult. But that risk can be lowered by lessening exposure to bullying and family stress during childhood and adolescence, new research suggests. This finding concerns premature babies born at 2.2 pounds or less. "We are concerned that being born really small and being exposed to all the stresses associated with preterm birth can lead to an amplification of normal stresses that predispose people to develop depression and anxiety later in life," said study author Ryan Van Lieshout. He is an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral neurosciences at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada. With support from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the study team reviewed ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders, Premature Labor, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Helping Preemies Avoid Unnecessary Antibiotics

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 5, 2017 – Researchers say they have identified three criteria that suggest an extremely premature infant has a low risk of developing sepsis, which might allow doctors to spare these babies early exposure to antibiotics. Sepsis is an infection of the blood, and it's a serious, life-threatening condition. But it isn't always easy to tell if these very small babies are sick due to an infection such as sepsis, or because their tiny bodies are so underdeveloped. "These babies can die very quickly of sepsis, which makes it very difficult to choose who really needs antibiotics," said Dr. Rick Stafford, director of neonatology at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mount Kisco, N.Y. Stafford was not involved in the study. At the same time, doctors are trying to reduce the use of unnecessary antibiotics, because when antibiotics are given to someone who doesn't need them, it ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Sepsis, Premature Labor, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

'Sleep Positioners' a Danger to Baby: FDA

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 4, 2017 – Infants should be put to sleep on their backs on a firm, empty surface and never placed on a sleep positioner, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) says. The agency warned parents and caregivers that these products, also known as "nests" or "anti-roll" supports, can prevent babies from breathing. The two most common sleep positioners include two raised pillows or "bolsters" attached to a mat. Babies younger than 6 months old are placed on the mat between the pillows to keep them in a specific position while they are sleeping. But putting babies to sleep on or near soft objects, such as positioners, toys, pillows and loose bedding, increases the risk for accidental suffocation and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), the American Academy of Pediatrics says. Some babies have been found in dangerous positions next to a positioner they had been placed in ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Same Pregnancy Meds Can Cost $200 -- or $11,000

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 3, 2017 – The same medication to prevent preterm birth can cost $200 – or nearly $11,000, a new study finds. Harvard Medical School researchers found that use of a brand name and prepackaging was associated with a 5,000 percent increase in the cost of the synthetic hormone progestin. They said the average per-pregnancy cost of a compounded, made-to-order form of the medication known as 17P was $206. That compared with $10,917 for a brand-name prepackaged version of the same medication. "Everyone is talking about how to pay for health care, but few talk about why health care in the United States is so expensive. Uncontrollable drug prices are a major cause of this trend," study co-author Andrew Beam said in a Harvard news release. He's an instructor of biomedical informatics. The two medications have the same active ingredients and are clinically interchangeable, ... Read more

Related support groups: Progesterone, Delivery, Prometrium, Premature Labor, Crinone, Cervical Ripening, Endometrin, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Progest, Prochieve, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Cyclogest, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Progesterone Topical, Progestasert System, Gestone

Heart-Lung Fitness Challenged in Early Full-Term Babies

Posted 28 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 27, 2017 – Infants born early in a full-term pregnancy have a higher risk of poor heart-lung fitness later in life, a new study suggests. The study included nearly 800 people in Northern Ireland who were born at full-term (37 to 42 weeks) and had their cardiorespiratory fitness assessed at ages 12, 15 and 22. Those born at 37 to 38 weeks had a 57 percent higher risk of poor heart-lung fitness when they were teens and young adults compared to those born between 39 and 42 weeks. Each extra week of full-term pregnancy was associated with a 14 percent reduced risk, the Australian researchers reported. Diet, physical activity and smoking behavior did not affect the findings, according to the study published Sept. 27 in the Journal of the American Heart Association. "We believe that earlier births – even within the at-term range – may interrupt normal development and lead ... Read more

Related support groups: Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Delivery, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Respiratory Tract Disease, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Premature Births Cost Health Plans Billions

Posted 21 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 21, 2017 – Premature births cost U.S. employer-sponsored health plans billions of dollars a year, a new study claims. About 1 in 10 infants in the country are born prematurely (less than 37 weeks gestation), putting them at increased risk for birth defects and long-term health problems. Employer-sponsored health plans spent at least $6 billion extra on premature infants born in 2013, and a large part of that was for infants with major birth defects. Infants with major birth defects accounted for less than 6 percent of the premature births, but one-quarter of the costs. "The contribution of this study is to start to tweak out the contribution of birth defects to that overall cost burden so we can start to prioritize efforts at prevention of both preterm births and birth defects," said study co-lead author Norman Waitzman, chair of the department of economics at the ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Researchers Find Genes Linked to Preterm Birth

Posted 6 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 6, 2017 – Researchers say they've pinpointed gene areas linked with preterm birth – and they said this could pave new ways to prevent the leading cause of death among children under age 5 worldwide. The team looked at DNA and other data from more than 50,000 women from the United States and northern European countries. The researchers identified six gene regions that influence the length of pregnancy and the timing of birth. "These are exciting findings that could play a key role in reducing newborn deaths and giving every child the chance to grow up smart and strong," said Trevor Mundel, president of the Global Health Division at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Preterm infants (born before 37 weeks of pregnancy) are at increased risk of death. Those who survive often have serious, lifelong health problems. The new study found that one of the gene areas ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Selenium, Premature Labor, Diagnosis and Investigation, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, MulTE-PAK-5, Chromic Chloride Hexahydrate/Copper Sulfate/Manganese Sulfate/Selenium/Zinc Sulfate, Multitrace-5 Concentrate, Pediatrace, Sele-Pak, MTE-5 Concentrated, Selepen, MTE-7, Chromic Chloride Hexahydrate/Copper Sulfate/Manganese Sulfate/Selenium/Sodium Iodide/Zinc Sulfate, Multitrace-5, Addamel N, PTE-5

Does Immune System Hold Clues to Preterm Births?

Posted 1 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 1, 2017 – By learning more about the immune system changes that occur during pregnancy, scientists hope they can someday predict if babies will be born prematurely. "Pregnancy is a unique immunological state. We found that the timing of immune system changes follows a precise and predictable pattern in normal pregnancy," said study senior author Dr. Brice Gaudilliere. He's an assistant professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine in California. If scientists can identify immune-system changes predicting premature birth, they say they might eventually develop a blood test to detect it. "Ultimately, we want to be able to ask, 'Does your immune clock of pregnancy run too slow or too fast?'" Gaudilliere said in a university news release. Nearly 10 percent of U.S. infants are born three or more weeks early. Currently, ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Labor Pain, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Does Race Matter in Care 'Preemie' Babies Receive?

Posted 28 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 28, 2017 – Race and ethnicity can make a difference in the quality of care a premature baby receives in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), a new study finds. Top-quality hospitals in California tend to deliver better care to white babies compared with black or Hispanic newborns, researchers report. In addition, black and Hispanic infants are more likely than white newborns to receive care at poor-quality NICUs, the study found. While these trends are real, they were not present across the board, the researchers added. Some California hospitals provided better care to minority babies than white infants, for example. The disparities in care are caused by many social, economic and organizational factors in the hospital and its surrounding community, said lead researcher Dr. Jochen Profit. He's an associate professor of pediatrics with the Stanford University School of ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Too Many Babies Still Placed on Stomach to Sleep: Study

Posted 21 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 21, 2017 – Despite years of public health campaigns, many American parents are still putting their babies to sleep in an unsafe position, a new study finds. The study found that just half of mothers surveyed said they always put their babies to sleep on their backs. Experts called the findings "frustrating," since back-sleeping has long been promoted as a key way to cut the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). In 1994, the U.S. government launched the "Back to Sleep" campaign to encourage parents to put their babies to sleep lying face-up. That came after research identified tummy-sleeping as a major risk factor for SIDS. Researchers believe SIDS is related to problems in the brain regions that control breathing and arousal from sleep. There is no way to tell which infants are vulnerable – so back-sleeping is the safest position for all babies in the first year of ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Parents of Preemies End Up Just Fine: Study

Posted 11 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 11, 2017 – The early life of a very premature baby can be a hectic and stressful time for parents. But once the child is grown, parents are as satisfied with life as those whose babies were born at full term, new European research finds. "Parents of very premature or very low birth-weight children did not differ in quality of life 27 years later compared to parents who had children born healthy and at term," said the study's lead author, Dieter Wolke. "This is a testament to resiliency and coping," added Wolke, a professor of developmental psychology and individual differences at Warwick Medical School in Coventry, England. A very premature baby is one born before 32 weeks' gestation. A very low birth weight is fewer than 3.3 pounds. Being born very prematurely or with a very low birth-weight is linked to a higher risk of death, long-term health problems and higher costs, ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Preterm Birth Risk Spikes in Mothers With Sleep Disorders

Posted 8 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 8, 2017 – Sleep disorders during pregnancy may increase the risk of preterm birth, a new study finds. The California research looked at 2,265 pregnant women who were diagnosed with a sleep disorder, such as insomnia or sleep apnea. They were compared to a control group of pregnant women without a sleep disorder diagnosis but with similar maternal risk factors for preterm birth, such as a previous preterm birth, smoking during pregnancy, or high blood pressure. The rate of preterm birth was 14.6 percent among women with sleep disorders and 10.9 percent among the control group. Preterm birth is defined as delivery before 37 weeks' gestation. The risk of delivery before 34 weeks' gestation was more than double among women with sleep apnea and nearly double among those with insomnia, according to the study. It was published Aug. 8 in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology. ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Sleep Apnea, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Premature Labor, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy

Good Diet, Exercise While Pregnant Could Cut C-section Risk

Posted 20 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 19, 2017 – Eating a healthy diet and exercising during pregnancy isn't just good for the developing baby. A new analysis of 36 studies including a total of more than 12,500 women suggests these behaviors can also lower a mom-to-be's chances of having a Cesarean-section delivery or developing diabetes while pregnant. Overall, healthy habits reduced the risk of needing a C-section by about 10 percent, said study author Shakila Thangaratinam. She's a professor of maternal and perinatal health at Queen Mary University of London. A healthy lifestyle also reduced a woman's risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy – known as gestational diabetes – by 24 percent, the findings showed. Not surprisingly, healthy habits also trimmed the possibility of excess weight gain during pregnancy. "Based on all the evidence to date, what we found was a healthy diet and moderate ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Emergency Contraception, Postcoital Contraception, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Premature Labor, Labor Induction, Cervical Ripening, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy

No Sign That Antidepressants in Pregnancy Harm Kids' Brains: Study

Posted 12 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 12, 2017 – For women battling depression, the decision over whether or not to continue their antidepressant during a pregnancy can be a difficult one. Now, reassuring news: A new study finds little risk of intellectual disability in children whose mothers take these pills while pregnant. The data "provides more information for clinicians to evaluate the risks in pregnant women taking antidepressants," said study co-author Abraham Reichenberg. He is a professor of psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. The new findings "should be factored into other considerations, such as the increased risk for the mother if [she is] not medicated, the drug's side effects, and other medical conditions," Reichenberg explained in a hospital news release. One specialist in the developing brain stressed that going without a needed antidepressant during ... Read more

Related support groups: Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Effexor, Prozac, Celexa, Citalopram, Paxil, Sertraline, Pristiq, Amitriptyline, Venlafaxine, Fluoxetine, Effexor XR, Mirtazapine, Escitalopram, Savella, Remeron, Nortriptyline, Elavil

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