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Premature Labor News

Just How Safe Is That Baby Teether?

Posted 11 hours ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7, 2016 – A chemical that's banned from baby bottles and children's drinking cups is still widely used in baby teethers, a new study finds. Researchers in the United States who tested five dozen baby teethers found all of them contained bisphenol-A (BPA) and other endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Studies in animals have shown that endocrine disruptors interfere with hormones and cause developmental, reproductive and neurological harm, according to the study authors. Although most of the teethers were labeled BPA-free or non-toxic, all of them contained BPA, the study found. BPA is banned from children's drinking utensils in the United States and much of Europe. The teethers also contained a range of parabens and the antimicrobial agents triclosan and triclocarban, which are also endocrine disruptors, the researchers said. "The findings could be used to develop ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Poisoning, Premature Labor, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Triclosan, Cesarean Section, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Lactation Augmentation, Cadisept, Digiclean, Aquasept, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Digiclean Slim-Line, Antiseptic Hand Soap, Sanygel, Bacti-Stat, Septisol, Cetaphil Antibacterial, Digiclean E

Are Catholic Women Less Likely to Breast-Feed?

Posted 2 days 6 hours ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 5, 2016 – Could religion play a role in breast-feeding practices? Women in Western nations with a strong Protestant heritage are more likely to breast-feed. However, the reverse seems to be true for those in nations with a strong Catholic heritage, new research suggests. "Our results suggest that women living in a country or region where Catholicism has historically dominated are less likely to initiate breast-feeding," according to the researchers. The study was led by Dr. Jonathan Bernard of Inserm, the national health research institute in France. "Breast-feeding promotion policies should be adapted to better fit populations' cultural and religious norms," Bernard and his colleagues added. The study doesn't prove that religion directly affects breast-feeding rates, however. It only suggests that they may be linked. The World Health Organization advises mothers to solely ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

C-Sections May Be Causing Evolutionary Changes

Posted 2 days 9 hours ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 5, 2016 – Why is it so difficult and painful for human females to give birth? Researchers have developed a new theory: Evolution favored small female pelvises and large newborns for good reasons. And, the researchers said, the rise of cesarean sections – the surgical delivery of a baby – in recent decades may be contributing to an even bigger gap between the size of newborns and their mothers' pelvises. In fact, the researchers estimate that the regular use of C-sections has led to a 10 to 20 percent increase in the gap between female pelvis width and babies' size. "Evolution is happening even in our modern society," said study lead author Philipp Mitteroecker, an assistant professor with the Department of Theoretical Biology at the University of Vienna, Austria. But, the human female pelvis has remained small, despite evolution, the researchers said. "The dimensions of ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Diagnosis and Investigation, Cervical Ripening, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Could C-Section Birth Raise Child's Risk of Obesity?

Posted 14 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Nov. 13, 2016 – Babies delivered via C-section might be at increased risk for childhood obesity, researchers contend. Compared to vaginally delivered children, cesarean-delivered children seem to have a 40 percent greater risk of becoming overweight or obese by the time they turn 7, the study found. The risk was even stronger in children born by C-section to overweight and obese mothers, ranging from 70 to 80 percent, said lead researcher Noel Mueller, an assistant professor of epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. "We also found that the protective association conferred by vaginal delivery was as strong, if not stronger, among mothers that were overweight or obese, suggesting that vaginal delivery among overweight or obese mothers may help to mitigate the intergenerational transmission of obesity," Mueller said. Babies pick up beneficial ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

New Moms Get No Iron Boost From Eating Placenta: Study

Posted 12 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 – Tens of thousands of new mothers eat their placenta, hoping to prevent or reverse iron deficiency after they give birth, a practice called placentophagy. But a new study says placenta may not provide as much iron as placentophagy advocates suggest. Eating human placenta in capsule form "neither significantly improves, nor impairs, postpartum maternal iron status for women consuming the recommended daily allowance of dietary iron during pregnancy/lactation," compared to a dummy pill, the study's authors concluded. The placenta, or afterbirth, connects the mother to her fetus in the womb. It supplies oxygen and nutrients to the fetus and hormones to the mother. Nearly all mammals eat it after giving birth, and advocates say human mothers who do so will have more energy, a better mood and a faster recovery after giving birth. Led by former University of Nevada, Las ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Labor Pain, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Premature Calcium Deposits May Trigger Premature Births: Study

Posted 9 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 9, 2016 – A new potential risk factor for premature birth has been identified. Ten percent of infants are born prematurely (before 37 weeks of pregnancy), and many suffer long-term health problems. Knowing why preterm births occur might help prevent them, researchers said. A team at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, found that calcium deposits in the membrane surrounding the fetus can form early and may cause a mother's water to break too soon. The deposits, early markers of bone, make the membrane less elastic. The same kind of deposits have also been implicated in kidney stones and hardening of the arteries. But the new study did not prove that these early calcium deposits cause premature birth. "We do see calcium deposits in full term births as well, which is probably part of the normal breakdown of the membranes at the appropriate time," study senior ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Calcium Oxalate Calculi with Hyperuricosuria, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Health Tip: Safer Sleep for Baby

Posted 8 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Exactly what do worried parents need to do to keep baby safer while the infant is asleep? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends: Always put baby to sleep on the back, until baby turns a year old. If baby rolls over, you don't need to keep flipping the infant back. Just keep the crib clear of any objects, including pillows, bumper pads, toys and blankets. If baby falls asleep in a swing, or car seat, transfer baby to the crib as soon as possible. Make sure baby's crib mattress is firm. Don't let baby sleep in your bed. But for at least the first six months, put baby's crib in your bedroom. Never let baby sleep on a couch or chair. If you swaddle baby, make sure it's not too tight. Stop swaddling when baby tries to roll over. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Urine Samples May Yield Clues to Fetal Health

Posted 4 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 4, 2016 – Urine samples in pregnancy may help doctors assess fetal growth and individualize recommendations for the baby's health, a new study contends. Abnormal fetal growth and birth weight are risk factors for chronic diseases later in life, including type 2 diabetes and obesity, the researchers noted. But metabolic substances in a mother's urine appear to indicate how large a baby will be at birth, the researchers said. Doctors ccould then suggest lifestyle changes to help maintain healthy fetal size, the researchers said in the Nov. 3 issue of BMC Medicine. "We used a technique called NMR spectroscopy to identify, for the first time, a panel of 10 urinary metabolites in the third trimester of pregnancy that were associated with greater fetal growth and increased birth weight," said study co-lead author Mireille Toledano, of Imperial College London in England. "These ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Premature Labor, Diagnosis and Investigation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Be Alert for PTSD After Pregnancy Loss

Posted 2 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2, 2016 – Post-traumatic stress disorder can develop in women after pregnancy loss, a new British study finds. Women who suffer a miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy should be routinely screened for PTSD and receive mental health support, the researchers said. "We were surprised at the high number of women who experienced symptoms of PTSD after early pregnancy loss," said study lead author Jessica Farren, of the department of surgery and cancer at Imperial College London. "At the moment, there is no routine follow-up appointment for women who have suffered a miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy," Farren said. "We have checks in place for [postpartum] depression, but we don't have anything in place for the trauma and depression following pregnancy loss," she said in a college news release. PTSD causes people to relive frightening or distressing events through nightmares, ... Read more

Related support groups: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Delivery, Premature Labor, Postpartum Bleeding, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

U.S. Premature Births Rise for 1st Time in 8 Years

Posted 1 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 1, 2016 – The rate of premature births in the United States increased in 2015 for the first time in eight years, and rates are especially high among certain racial and ethnic groups, a March of Dimes report says. The overall rate rose from 9.57 percent to 9.63 percent, according to data from the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. Rates in 2015 were nearly 48 percent higher for black women and more than 15 percent higher for American Indian/Alaska Native women compared to white women, according to the report. The findings led the March of Dimes to give the United States a "C" grade on its latest Premature Birth Report Card. The report card "demonstrates that there is an unfair burden of premature birth among specific racial and ethnic groups as well as geographic areas," said Dr. Jennifer Howse, president of the March of Dimes. "The March of Dimes strives for a ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Every Day in the Womb Boosts Babies' Brain Development: Study

Posted 31 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 – Carrying a baby as close to full term as possible is better for the baby's brain development, a new study suggests. "What this study shows us is that every day and every week of in utero development is critical," said study senior author Catherine Limperopoulos. She directs the Developing Brain Research Laboratory at Children's National Health System in Washington, D.C. "If at all possible, we need to keep fetuses in utero to protect them from the hazards that can occur in the extra uterine environment," she said in a hospital system news release. The researchers said that during the third trimester of pregnancy, the fetal brain grows exponentially. The brain increases fourfold in size during this time, the researchers added. The study included 75 preterm infants born before 32 weeks of pregnancy. The mean gestational age was 27 weeks. These babies weighed less ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Weight-Loss Surgery May Lower Risk of Pregnancy Complications

Posted 28 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 – Women who undergo weight-loss surgery gain major benefits when it comes to pregnancy, a new study suggests. Researchers found these women appear to be less likely to need a cesarean-section delivery and more likely to have a normal-sized baby. "These findings are important because we were able to confirm that obese women who undergo bariatric [weight-loss] operations prior to conceiving do not have worse outcomes, compared with obese women who don't have these procedures," said senior study author Dr. Aliu Sanni. He is medical director of the department of metabolic and bariatric surgery at Eastside Medical Center in Snellville, Ga. "We want to make sure that bariatric surgery performed before pregnancy will have benefits for these women, and that having a procedure won't harm the baby," he said in a news release from the American College of Surgeons. It's well ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Delivery, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Premature Labor, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Birthing Pool Not the Place to Deliver, New Guidelines Say

Posted 25 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 – While a birthing pool during the early stages of labor may offer some advantages, women should not deliver their baby in the water, new guidelines advise. Birthing pools can be found in hospitals, birthing centers or at home. A woman in labor lies in a tub of warm water to help ease delivery. "Immersion in water during the first stage of labor may offer some benefits: It may shorten labor and is associated with a decreased use of epidurals [injecting anesthesia into the spine]," said Dr. Joseph Wax. He chaired the committee that developed the recommendations for the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). "However, it is important to differentiate between laboring in water and delivering in water," Wax said in an ACOG news release. "There is no evidence to support delivering a baby in water has benefits to the baby." In fact, according to ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Postpartum Bleeding, Labor Pain, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Doctors Should Promote Breast-Feeding to Patients: Panel

Posted 25 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 – Doctors should provide breast-feeding support and guidance to new mothers and pregnant women, an expert panel says. This includes education about the benefits of breast-feeding, encouragement and practical help on how to breast-feed, according to the new U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation. Primary care providers should help women make an informed choice about breast-feeding, the panel said. "Breast-feeding has real health benefits for babies and their mothers. Primary care clinicians can help new moms who breast-feed be successful," said task force member Ann Kurth, dean of the Yale School of Nursing in New Haven, Conn. "Primary care interventions to support breast-feeding are effective in increasing both the number of mothers who breast-feed and how long they breast-feed their babies," she added in a task force news release. Breast-feeding ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Lactation Suppression, Lactation Augmentation, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Infants Should Share Parents' Room to Help Prevent SIDS

Posted 24 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 – Infants should sleep in the same room as their parents – but not in the same bed – to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics advise. The recommendations call for babies to share their parents' bedroom for at least the first 6 months of life and, ideally, for the first year. This could reduce the risk of sudden death by as much as 50 percent, the guideline authors say. "Room sharing makes a lot of sense," said Dr. Paul Jarris, deputy medical officer at the March of Dimes. The rationale is that having the infant within view and reach makes for easier monitoring, comforting and feeding. Because the baby is nearby, parents might notice any potential difficulty, Jarris said. "If we look at how strong the evidence is, parents will be well advised to adopt room sharing," Jarris said. It's ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

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