Skip to Content

Join the 'Post MI Syndrome' group to help and get support from people like you.

Post MI Syndrome News

Related terms: Postmyocardial infarction syndrome

Fish Oil Pills May Help After Heart Attack, Specialists Say

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 13, 2017 – Doctors may want to consider prescribing fish oil pills to heart attack survivors and patients with chronic heart failure, new recommendations from the American Heart Association suggest. Fish oil may help extend the lives of those patients, the heart association said. On the other hand, the supplements cannot be recommended for preventing heart problems in the first place, said Dr. David Siscovick, lead author of the report. That's because no clinical trials have tested fish oil's effects in people who are free of heart disease. Meanwhile, a few trials have given fish oil to people at increased risk of heart disease – because of diabetes or high cholesterol, for example. All but one has come up empty. "Many people take fish oil hoping to prevent heart disease," Siscovick acknowledged. "But there's a lack of evidence that it does." Fish oil is rich in omega-3 ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, High Cholesterol, Arrhythmia, Fish Oil, Lovaza, Transient Ischemic Attack, Diabetes Mellitus, Omega-3, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Omacor, Ischemic Heart Disease, MaxEPA, Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids, Restora, Animi-3, Marine Lipid Concentrate, Post MI Syndrome, Omega 3-6-9 Complex

Health Tip: Resuming Activities After a Heart Attack

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Life after a heart attack may seem uncertain, and you may be anxious to get back to your regular activities. The American Academy of Family Physicians advises: Talk to your doctor about specific activities, and when it is safe to resume them. The amount of time needed before returning to work depends on your job. You may need to adjust your work and schedule. It's typically safe to drive again about a week after your heart attack, but check with your doctor. Also, ask your doctor about when to resume intimacy. Go slowly and allow yourself time to heal. Make lifestyle changes that could speed your recovery. Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Impotence Meds Might Give Men's Hearts a Boost, Too

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 9, 2017 – Men taking Viagra, Levitra or Cialis to revitalize their sex life might experience a valuable side benefit: enhanced heart health, researchers say. Those erectile dysfunction drugs, called PDE5 inhibitors, appear to reduce a man's risk of death or heart failure after a first heart attack, according to preliminary study findings. Men taking this type of ED drug had a 33 percent reduced risk of death within three years of their first heart attack, compared to men not taking the PDE5 inhibitor, said lead researcher Dr. Daniel Andersson. The men also experienced a 40 percent reduced risk of subsequent hospitalization for heart failure, said Andersson, a postdoctoral researcher at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden. Further, it appeared that taking more of the drug increased the survival advantage, he added. "We also find a dose-dependent relationship between ... Read more

Related support groups: Viagra, Erectile Dysfunction, Cialis, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Levitra, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Sexual Deviations or Disorders, Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Loneliness Often Plagues Black Women at Risk for Heart Disease

Posted 22 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 – Heart disease can be a heavy burden for anyone. But new research suggests that black women at risk for the illness are also more prone to loneliness and money worries than their white peers. That's important, researchers said, because there's evidence that loneliness can raise risks of heart disease and other health problems. Black women "at risk for cardiovascular disease [often] have unique predictors of loneliness" compared to white women, study author Karen Saban said in a news release from the International Stroke Conference. Saban is associate dean for research at Loyola University's School of Nursing, in Maywood, Ill. She was to present the findings at the stroke meeting in Houston on Tuesday. The new study included 50 black and 49 white postmenopausal women with at least two risk factors for heart disease. The women completed questionnaires outlining ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Lisinopril, Metoprolol, Heart Disease, Atenolol, Losartan, Heart Attack, Menopausal Disorders, Benicar, Diovan, Bystolic, Angina, Ramipril, Bisoprolol, Postmenopausal Symptoms, Cozaar, Micardis, Valsartan, Enalapril, Benazepril

Beware Heart Attack Risk From Shoveling Snow

Posted 13 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 13, 2017 – Shoveling is the probable reason why men are more likely to suffer a heart attack after a heavy snowfall, researchers report. In a new study, investigators analyzed data on heart attacks between the months of November and April in the province of Quebec between 1981 and 2014. About 60 percent of hospital admissions and deaths due to heart attack were in men. The findings showed that men's risk of heart attack hospitalization and death was higher after heavy snowfalls. The highest risk was on the day after a snowfall and after snowfalls lasting two to three days. The risk of heart attack after a snowfall was higher regardless of age, cardiovascular risk factors or other health conditions. The link between snowfalls and increased heart attack risk was not seen in women, the study authors noted. However, "men are potentially more likely than women to shovel, ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Calcium Buildup in Young Arteries May Signal Heart Attack Risk

Posted 8 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8, 2017 – Young adults with any amount of calcified plaque in their arteries are already at risk of a heart attack, a new study finds. Among those 32 to 46 years old, even a little calcified plaque – called atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries – can boost the odds for fatal or nonfatal heart disease fivefold over the next 12 years, researchers found. "Heart disease really begins in adolescence and early adulthood," said lead researcher Dr. Jeffrey Carr. Carr is a professor of radiology, biomedical informatics and cardiovascular medicine at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn. For the study, CT scans, which can detect these potentially deadly blockages, were performed on more than 3,000 participants whose average age was 40. Just a small amount of plaque increased the risk of heart attack over the next decade by 10 percent, regardless of other risk ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Metoprolol, Smoking, Heart Disease, Atenolol, Ischemic Stroke, Losartan, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Propranolol, Benicar, Diovan, Heart Failure, Spironolactone, Congestive Heart Failure, Bystolic, Lasix

What to Do If You Think You're Having a Heart Attack

Posted 3 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 3, 2017 – Would you be able to recognize the urgent symptoms of a heart attack – and know how to respond to it? The heart-related deaths of such celebrities as "Star Wars" actress Carrie Fisher, singer-songwriter George Michael and actor Bernard Fox are a powerful reminder that everyone should know the symptoms of serious heart problems, the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) said. People need to take potential heart attack symptoms seriously and immediately call 911 or get to the nearest emergency department. According to the ACEP, the most common symptoms of heart attack are: Uncomfortable pressure, fullness, squeezing or pain in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or goes away and returns, Pain that spreads to the shoulders, neck, jaw, arms or back, Chest discomfort along with lightheadedness, fainting, sweating, nausea or ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Nausea/Vomiting, Lisinopril, Heart Disease, Losartan, Heart Attack, Benicar, Diovan, Ramipril, Cozaar, Dyspnea, Micardis, Valsartan, Enalapril, Benazepril, Avapro, Atacand, Nitroglycerin, Irbesartan, Imdur

ER Doctor Offers Tips for Safer Snow Shoveling

Posted 31 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 – If you're a middle-aged couch potato, shoveling snow could put you at risk for a heart attack. While shoveling isn't dangerous for many people, certain people are at higher risk. The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends that people should check with a doctor first if they don't get regular exercise, have a medical condition or are middle-aged or older. If you must shovel, know the symptoms of a heart attack. Symptoms include: pain in the chest, arm(s), back, neck, jaw or stomach; a cold sweat; shortness of breath; nausea; lightheadedness; and uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness in the center of your chest. "If you are concerned that you may be having a heart attack, you should not hesitate about seeking medical treatment – every minute is crucial when experiencing a heart attack," said Dr. George Becker. He is director of the emergency department ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Back Pain, Lisinopril, Losartan, Heart Attack, Benicar, Diovan, Lasix, Furosemide, Ramipril, Digoxin, Cozaar, Micardis, Valsartan, Enalapril, Benazepril, Minoxidil, Phenylephrine, Avapro, Nitroglycerin

Study Suggests Newer Cholesterol Drugs Are Safe

Posted 31 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 – A combination of drugs that drastically lowers "bad" cholesterol levels appears safe for heart patients, but whether it prevents heart attacks or strokes isn't yet known, researchers report. "It may be that people need very low cholesterol levels to get a benefit in terms of heart attacks and stroke reduction, but that remains to be determined," said lead researcher Dr. Jennifer Robinson. She directs the University of Iowa's Preventive Intervention Center. It had been feared that very low levels of bad (LDL) cholesterol might trigger memory problems or nervous system disorders, but all the researchers found was a slightly increased risk of cataracts. That increased risk may have shown up because some of the people in the study were older and already prone to cataracts, although it could be something about the treatment itself, Robinson said. In the study, ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Lipitor, Crestor, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Hypertriglyceridemia, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Repatha, Praluent, Alirocumab, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome, Evolocumab, Repatha Pushtronex

Body Cooling Little Help to Kids When Heart Stops: Study

Posted 25 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 – Body cooling offers no advantage over normal temperature control in treating infants and children whose hearts suddenly stop beating, a new study suggests. The study included 329 children, aged 2 days to 18 years, who suffered cardiac arrest in a hospital. Some had their body temperature maintained within normal range, while others had their body temperature lowered below the normal range to try to reduce brain damage. Current guidelines recommend the use of either approach. Both treatments helped control fever and led to similar survival rates and brain function outcomes one year later. "Some hospitals and physicians have routinely used body cooling for all patients who experience cardiac arrest because they believed it might lead to better outcomes," said study author Dr. Frank Moler, a pediatric critical care physician at the University of Michigan's C.S. ... Read more

Related support groups: Fever, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Cardiogenic Shock, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

'Stress Ball' in Your Brain May Be Key to Heart Risks

Posted 12 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 – Doctors have long known that a stressed life does no favors for the heart, and new research may help unravel why that's so. A Harvard team says heightened activity in a key part of the brain may explain why stress boosts people's odds for heart disease and stroke. The finding "raises the possibility that reducing stress could produce benefits that extend beyond an improved sense of psychological well-being," said study lead author Dr. Ahmed Tawakol, who co-directs the cardiac imaging program at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. One neurologist agreed that the research could have real value for patients. "This study provides information that can help us better understand the mechanisms in which the body and the brain affect each other," said Dr. Jeffrey Borenstein. He is president of the Brain & Behavior Foundation in New York City. "A better ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Myocardial Infarction, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Peripheral Arterial Disease, Intermittent Claudication, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Body Imaging, Post MI Syndrome, Head Imaging

Women Chasing Holiday Perfection May Miss Signs of Heart Trouble

Posted 23 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 23, 2016 – Holiday pressure can stress anybody out, but some women get so anxious about making everything perfect that they miss the signs of serious heart problems. One of those threats is a so-called "silent heart attack." "Most of the time people who are experiencing a heart attack will have pain in the chest, shortness of breath, etc. Silent heart attack symptoms might be as simple as indigestion, flu-like symptoms, or feeling discomfort like a pulled muscle in the chest or back," said Dr. Karla Kurrelmeyer, a cardiologist at Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center. It's important to have these symptoms checked as soon as possible to avoid scarring or damage to the heart, she said in a hospital news release. Another condition, known as stress-induced cardiomyopathy, can strike women when they're under great stress and hit with a traumatic life event like the ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Is Season the Reason Why Heart Deaths Spike at Christmas?

Posted 23 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 22, 2016 – It's not the chill of winter that causes a spike in heart-related deaths at Christmas and New Year's – it's the holiday season itself, Australian researchers contend. In New Zealand, where December and January are the height of summer, researchers found more than a 4 percent increase in heart-related deaths from Dec. 25 through Jan. 7. "The Christmas effect that has been seen in the northern hemisphere winter is able to be seen during the summer also," said lead researcher Josh Knight, a research fellow at the University of Melbourne. "This means that there is a risk associated with the holiday period independent of the seasonality," he said. Exactly why the holidays are linked with a boost in heart-related deaths is open to debate. "There are likely to be two separate populations who are combining to create the Christmas effect," Knight said. One is people ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

High Pain Tolerance Tied to 'Silent' Heart Attack Risk

Posted 22 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21, 2016 – People who are less sensitive to pain may be at increased risk of having a "silent" heart attack, a new study hints. Chest pain is one of the "classic" symptoms of a heart attack. But many people have so-called silent heart attacks, where they notice no obvious symptoms. "Almost everyone knows what a heart attack is. When we hear about it, we think of chest pain and [emergency] medical care," said Dr. Andrea Ohrn, the lead researcher on the new study. "But what's less known is, many people experience heart attacks without knowing it – without ever receiving a diagnosis," said Ohrn, a fellow at the University of Tromso in Norway. No one knows why that is. But the new findings suggest that pain tolerance might be a factor. Using a standard test of pain sensitivity, Ohrn's team found that people who had a silent heart attack in the past generally had a higher ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Back Pain, Chronic Pain, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

HIV May Double Odds of Heart Attack

Posted 22 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21, 2016 – As people with HIV are living longer, new concerns are cropping up, such as a risk for heart attack up to two times greater than for people without the AIDS-causing virus, a new study reports. Those increased odds are seen even in people whose virus has been suppressed to undetectable levels in the blood with antiretroviral drugs, the researchers said. There are several reasons for this higher risk, said lead researcher Dr. Matthew Feinstein, a cardiology fellow at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. "A key factor appears to be chronic HIV-associated inflammation that persists even when there is no detectable virus in the blood," he said. Feinstein explained that the heart disease and stroke risk is higher "because the virus maintains a reservoir in the body's tissues, driving a chronic inflammatory and immune response that can ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, HIV Infection, Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, Myocardial Infarction, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome, Family History of Myocardial Infarction

Page 1 2 3 4 5 Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Myocardial Infarction, Heart Attack