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Getting Back in Shape in 2018? Great, But Do It Safely

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 2, 2018 – Getting into shape or losing a few pounds is a worthy New Year's resolution, but one that comes with a warning: Take it slow. Jumping whole-hog into an exercise regime is a good way to get yourself hurt if you haven't worked out for a while, experts say. "People get into trouble when they want to do too much too soon," said Dr. Gerardo Miranda-Comas, an assistant professor of rehabilitation at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. "You need to increase your level of activity gradually." "Consider it more like a marathon than a sprint," he said. Keep in mind that you've likely lost a good amount of fitness if you haven't worked out in a while, warns the American Council on Exercise (ACE). People who stop regular resistance training tend to lose their strength at about half the rate it was gained, and cardio fitness declines even faster ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Angina, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Post MI Syndrome

New 'Patch' May Repair Damaged Hearts

Posted 29 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 29, 2017 – A patch that might one day help repair heart attack damage has been developed by researchers. The patch, which consists of fully functioning artificial human heart muscle, is large enough to cover damage typically caused by a heart attack, according to biomedical engineers at Duke University. The Duke team described the development, which was tested in rodents, as a significant advance in efforts to repair dead heart muscle. "Right now, virtually all existing therapies are aimed at reducing the symptoms from the damage that's already been done to the heart, but no approaches have been able to replace the muscle that's lost because, once it's dead, it does not grow back on its own," said Ilya Shadrin. He is a biomedical engineering doctoral student and the report's lead author. "This is a way that we could replace lost muscle with tissue made outside the ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Diagnosis and Investigation, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Pricey ER Tests for Chest Pain Often Unnecessary

Posted 15 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 15, 2017 – ER doctors frequently use pricey but unnecessary tests to determine whether people with chest pain are having a heart attack, a new study reveals. Results show that patients don't do any better when CT scans or treadmill stress tests are tacked onto the standard battery of diagnostic tests for chest pain patients. "You don't need all this imaging just to rule out the diagnosis of a heart attack," said senior researcher Dr. David Brown, a professor with Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "They provide no additional value." Around 10 million Americans land in the emergency room each year with chest pain that could indicate a heart attack, the researchers said. Doctors typically evaluate heart attack using blood tests, an EKG, a medical history and a physical examination, Brown said. The blood test looks for troponin, a protein released by ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Diagnosis and Investigation, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Motor On, Heart Patients: Electric Cars Don't Harm Cardiac Implants

Posted 14 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 13, 2017 – Heart patients who've bought an all-electric Tesla need not worry that their car might interfere with their implanted defibrillator. That's the finding from a new study of 34 seniors who had the devices, which help guard against dangerous irregular heartbeats. The study "demonstrates the safety of the Tesla electric vehicle in patients with cardiac defibrillators and is the first step in establishing that these vehicles are safe for patients with cardiac devices," said Dr. Apoor Patel, a cardiologist who reviewed the findings. Patel directs cardiac electrophysiology at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. He believes the study will "need to be replicated [in] other vehicles," but also noted that "the Tesla generated the most electrical activity during charging." The new study was led by Drs. Thein Tun Aung and Abdul Wase, of Good Samaritan Hospital in Dayton, ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Tachyarrhythmia, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Ventricular Tachycardia, Myocardial Infarction, Bradyarrhythmia, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Atrial Tachycardia, Post MI Syndrome

Does Sex Really Trigger Cardiac Arrest?

Posted 12 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Nov. 12, 2017 – It's a common Hollywood trope – an older guy is having enthusiastic sex with a gal half his age when he suddenly flops over dead. But in real life, sexual activity very rarely causes cardiac arrest, a new study reassuringly reports. Sex was linked to only 34 out of more than 4,500 cardiac arrests that occurred in the Portland, Ore., metropolitan area between 2002 and 2015. That's a rate of just 0.7 percent, the researchers noted. Of those cases, 18 occurred during sex and 15 immediately after sex. Time couldn't be determined for the last case. "I'm a little surprised at the really tiny number," said study senior researcher Dr. Sumeet Chugh, medical director of the Heart Rhythm Center at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. "But mostly I feel it's reassuring data." The news is most welcome for patients with heart problems who aren't sure if sex could be ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Erectile Dysfunction, Heart Attack, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Myocardial Infarction, Premature Ejaculation, Sexual Deviations or Disorders, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Many Women Miss Out on Lifesaving CPR

Posted 12 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Nov. 11, 2017 – America's hang-ups over sexuality and gender could cost women their lives when their heart suddenly stops, a new study suggests. Simply put, women suffering from cardiac arrest in a public setting are less likely to get lifesaving CPR from a passerby than men are, researchers reported. "When it comes to life and death, we need to reassure the public that we're not worrying about what seems socially inappropriate or taboo," said senior study author Dr. Benjamin Abella. He is director of the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Resuscitation Science. "The situation requires action, and it requires people to not hesitate. A life is on the line," Abella added. But the study showed people do hesitate, especially when the victim is a woman. About 45 percent of men who suffered cardiac arrest in a public setting received CPR from a bystander, compared with only 39 ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Tai Chi: A Gentler Way to Exercise for Ailing Hearts

Posted 11 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 11, 2017 – People with heart disease who shy away from traditional cardiac rehabilitation may benefit from tai chi. A small study found that the slow, gentle movements of this traditional Chinese practice may help increase physical activity among those who are reluctant to exercise. More than 60 percent of heart attack survivors opt out of cardiac rehabilitation, often because of the perception that the exercise involved will be unpleasant or painful, according to the study authors. "We thought that tai chi might be a good option for these people because you can start very slowly and simply and, as their confidence increases, the pace and movements can be modified to increase intensity," said study author Dr. Elena Salmoirago-Blotcher. She is an assistant professor of medicine at the Warren Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University. "Tai chi exercise can reach ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Surviving Heart Attack Often Means Leaving Job Behind

Posted 4 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 4, 2017 – Recovering from a heart attack can be a long, painful process, and now a new study finds that almost one-quarter of those patients who returned to work ultimately left their jobs over the following year. The findings suggest that "even though patients return to work after a heart attack, they may still require individual adjustments at their workplaces in order to stay employed," said study author Dr. Laerke Smedegaard Petersen. She is a graduate student at Copenhagen University Hospital in Denmark. An estimated 676,000 people in the United States survive heart attacks each year, according to the American Heart Association. Many survivors are of working age: The average age of heart attack is 65 for men and 72 for women, the association says. The new study examined the medical and work records of over 22,000 patients in Denmark who were employed before ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Stopping Aspirin Tied to Quick Rise in Heart Attack, Stroke Risk

Posted 26 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 25, 2017 – People who stop following their doctor's advice to take a daily aspirin may see their risk of heart attack and stroke quickly rise, a new study suggests. Low-dose aspirin is a standard therapy for people at increased risk of a heart attack or stroke. But many eventually stop taking it, or at least consider quitting, said Dr. Johan Sundstrom, the lead researcher on the new study. Sometimes it's because of side effects, such as upset stomach, according to Sundstrom, a professor at Uppsala University, in Sweden. Other times, he said, it's simple "forgetfulness." His team wanted to find out what happened when patients quit their low-dose aspirin. The investigators looked at medical records from more than 600,000 Swedish adults who'd been prescribed aspirin to prevent cardiovascular trouble. (In Sweden, it's given by prescription, not over-the-counter, as in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Excedrin, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Alka-Seltzer, Aggrenox, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Arthritis Pain, Ecotrin, Fiorinal with Codeine, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Bayer Aspirin, Norgesic, Arthritis Pain Formula, Soma Compound, Excedrin Extra Strength, Anacin

Wrongly Focusing On The Airway Can Cost Athletes' Lives in Cardiac Arrest

Posted 19 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 19, 2017 – Athletes are dying from cardiac arrests that occur during play because teammates, coaches and other bystanders don't know how to best save their lives, a new study claims. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) applied immediately can give these athletes a fighting chance, but onlookers failed to provide CPR in three out of five cases, according to a review of more than two dozen game videos. Bystanders instead most often tried to keep the athlete from swallowing his or her tongue, acting on the widespread misconception that this must be done to prevent a person in cardiac arrest from asphyxiating, said lead researcher Dana Viskin. She is with the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center and Sackler School of Medicine at Tel Aviv University in Israel. "Athletes, especially professional athletes, are receiving poor CPR because the first responders – that is, their fellow ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Myocardial Infarction, Cardiac Arrest, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Cardiogenic Shock, Asystole, Post MI Syndrome

Oxygen Therapy Doesn't Boost Heart Attack Survival

Posted 30 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30, 2017 – Oxygen therapy is a routine treatment for people suspected of having a heart attack, but a new study suggests there may be no benefit for these patients. That was true even for patients who were older, smoked or had diabetes or heart disease, according to the Swedish researchers. The "study questions the current practice of routine oxygen therapy for all patients with suspected [heart attack]," said lead author Dr. Robin Hofmann, a cardiologist from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. Patients who may have had a heart attack and are having trouble breathing, not getting adequate oxygen or have heart failure are often treated with oxygen therapy, in which oxygen is delivered through a mask or tubes in the nose, the researchers explained. "ESC [European Society of Cardiology] guidelines have gradually shifted towards more restrictive use of oxygen," said ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Oxygen, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

More U.S. Airports Offer Hands-Only CPR Training

Posted 26 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 25, 2017 – Hands-only CPR training is now available at kiosks in three more major U.S. airports, bringing the total number to seven. The three airports are Cleveland Hopkins International, Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International, and Orlando International, according to the American Heart Association (AHA). Since 2016, more than 20,000 visitors have learned hands-only CPR from the kiosks at O'Hare International in Chicago, Indianapolis International, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International and Baltimore-Washington International, the AHA said. "Only 46 percent of people who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest receive bystander CPR before professional help arrives," said Dr. Clifton Callaway, a volunteer on the AHA's Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and a professor of emergency medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. "The airport kiosks have proven to be an ... Read more

Related support groups: Lisinopril, Metoprolol, Losartan, Atenolol, Heart Attack, Propranolol, Benicar, Diovan, Bystolic, Carvedilol, Ramipril, Bisoprolol, Minoxidil, Valsartan, Coreg, Enalapril, Sotalol, Inderal, Cozaar, Benazepril

Timing Is Everything With Heart Attacks

Posted 14 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 14, 2017 – Times of high stress – Mondays and winter holidays – seem to be especially hard on the heart, according to new research that suggests these periods are when heart attacks are most likely to occur. On the flip side, heart attacks are least likely to occur when you're chilling out on the weekend or your summer vacation, the study found. The findings stem from an analysis of more than 156,000 heart attack cases. They were treated at Swedish hospitals over eight years. While other factors likely play a role in heart attack risk, stress appears to be a substantial contributor, according to study first author John Wallert, a Ph.D. student at Uppsala University in Sweden. However, he noted that this study is an observational study, and that means it cannot prove a cause-and-effect relationship. It can only show a link between heart attacks and certain time periods. ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

CT Scans Might Help Gauge Heart Attack Risk

Posted 12 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 12, 2017 – A new CT scan analysis may allow doctors to identify blood vessel inflammation before heart problems actually crop up, researchers report. Detecting inflammation before it hardens into irreversible plaque could potentially help cardiologists prevent heart attacks, the scientists said. "Currently, CT only tells you whether there are narrowings in the arteries of the heart, but there is no imaging to tell you which one of these narrowings is prone to rupture, a process that would lead to heart attacks," said lead researcher Dr. Charalambos Antoniades. "The vulnerable narrowings, or plaques, are the highly inflamed ones," explained Antoniades, an associate professor of cardiovascular medicine at the University of Oxford in England. "Detecting inflammation would allow detection of vulnerable patients prone to have heart attacks." Antoniades and his colleagues ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Post MI Syndrome

Fewer U.S. Dollars Spent on Cardiac Arrest Research: Study

Posted 12 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 12, 2017 – Cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the United States, yet it receives much less government funding for research than other leading causes of death, researchers report. Adjusted for inflation, U.S. National Institutes of Health funding for cardiac arrest research fell from $35.4 million in 2007 to $28.5 million in 2016, the study authors said. Cardiac arrest – the sudden loss of heart function – claims more than 450,000 lives in the United States each year, according to the Institute of Medicine. "If you look at the public health burden of cardiac arrest, it's a major public health issue," said senior author Dr. Robert Neumar. He is chair of the University of Michigan Health System's emergency medicine department. In 2015, the NIH invested about $13,000 for each death from diabetes versus $91 for each death from cardiac arrest, the study ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Cardiac Arrest, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

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