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Medical School Can Be an Emotional Pressure-Cooker

Posted 2 days 14 hours ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 6, 2016 – Many medical students from around the world struggle with depression, and more than 1 in 10 have suicidal thoughts, researchers report. And only about 16 percent of the students who tested positive for depression sought treatment, they added. The researchers analyzed nearly 200 studies that included a total of 129,000 medical students in 47 countries. They found that the rate of depression or depressive symptoms was 27 percent. The researchers also found that 11 percent of the students reported thoughts of suicide. The findings were published in the Dec. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Reliable estimates of depression and thoughts of suicide among medical students are key for efforts to prevent, treat and identify causes of emotional distress in the students, according to study leader Dr. Douglas Mata, of Brigham and Women's Hospital ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Postpartum Depression, Performance Anxiety

High Utility Bills Strain More Than the Budget

Posted 27 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 – High utility bills can be more than a budget-buster. They also can cause anxiety and depression in low-income families, a new study finds. The study included 72 families in the Boston area with annual incomes of $32,000 or less and utility costs that were as much as $650 a month at the height of winter. Utility bills "at $200 per month represent nearly 30 percent of household income for those at or near the federal poverty level, making it a significant, and likely unaffordable, expense," said study author Diana Hernandez. "While participants often expressed an ethos of responsibly 'paying the bills,' many simply cannot afford the monthly utility payments and were often 'playing catch-up' in a vicious economic cycle of prioritization and trade-offs, complicating the already fragile financial profiles of low-income ratepayers," she said. Hernandez is an ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Performance Anxiety

Health Tip: Managing Daily Stress

Posted 27 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Stress can add up to serious emotional and physical health problems. Learning to manage it can help you handle whatever comes your way. The American Academy of Family Physicians recommends: Trying not to spend time worrying about things that are out of your control. Finding ways to tackle small problems, giving you a better sense of control. Preparing for stressful events, such as a job interview. Viewing changes as challenges to embrace, rather than as threats. Finding ways to resolve problems with others. Leaning on friends, loved ones or counselors for support. Avoiding a cluttered schedule. Keeping your goals realistic. Exercising regularly, eating nutritious food and getting enough sleep. Blowing off steam with a hobby or sport you enjoy. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Performance Anxiety

Mouse Study Hints at Which Brain Cells Trigger Fear

Posted 9 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 9, 2016 – In experiments with mice, researchers say they have found cells in the brain that play a major role in triggering anxiety. These cells are in a part of the brain called the hypothalamus, the scientists said. To pinpoint these cells, the researchers blocked cells from getting the stress hormone called corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). CRH is a hormone involved in the body's "fight-or-flight" response, the researchers explained. Much to the researchers surprise, when CRH was blocked in some cells, anxiety behaviors such as vigilance, fear and suspicion were reduced, said one of the study's authors, Rhong Zang. He's with the division of Endocrinology at Boston Children's Hospital. Without the influence of CRH in these cells, mice were able to do things they normally feared, such as walking on elevated gangplanks, exploring brightly lit areas and approaching ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Performance Anxiety

Are 'Workaholics' Prone to OCD, Anxiety?

Posted 10 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 10, 2016 – Some workaholics may be prone to mental health disorders, compared to folks with greater work-life balance, new research suggests. These disorders may include anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and depression, the study authors said. The findings, based on a review of more than 15,000 Norwegians, suggest that "taking work to the extreme may be a sign of deeper psychiatric issues," said study lead author Cecilie Schou Andreassen. "Physicians should not take for granted that a seemingly successful workaholic doesn't have these disorders," said Schou Andreassen, a clinical psychologist with the University of Bergen, in Norway. The research doesn't delve into cause and effect, so it's not clear how mental health issues and overwork might be linked. Nor should hard workers be labeled as workaholics, although ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dysthymia, Performance Anxiety

Women More Prone to Anxiety Than Men, Review Finds

Posted 6 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 6, 2016 – Struggling with anxiety? Then odds are you're a woman and you live in either North America or Western Europe. That's the conclusion of a new British study that found that women are twice as likely to suffer from anxiety as men. Moreover, people in North America and Western Europe are more prone to anxiety disorders than those from other parts of the world. In North America, nearly eight of 100 people suffer from anxiety – the most in the world. In East Asia, it's fewer than three in 100 – the lowest, the review authors noted. "Anxiety is important and shouldn't be overlooked," said lead researcher Olivia Remes, who's with the department of public health and primary care at the University of Cambridge's Strangeways Research Laboratory. "Sometimes people think that anxiety is just a part of their personality or that there's nothing they can do about it, but there ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Performance Anxiety, Agoraphobia, Avoidant Personality Disorder

Pain, Epilepsy Drug Lyrica May Increase Birth Defects Risk, Study Suggests

Posted 18 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 – The widely prescribed drug pregabalin (Lyrica) may slightly increase the risk for birth defects, a new study suggests. In a small study, researchers found that among women taking Lyrica during the first trimester of pregnancy, 6 percent had infants with major birth defects. In women who weren't taking the drug, 2 percent had a baby with a major birth defect, the study found. "These results should be taken with caution," said study senior author Dr. Thierry Buclin, from the Swiss Teratogen Information Service and the division of clinical pharmacology at the Lausanne University Hospital, in Switzerland. "It's a warning, but it cannot be taken as a certainty." Lyrica is prescribed for a range of health problems, including epilepsy, fibromyalgia and anxiety. The new study findings should be investigated further, Buclin said. "We should not unduly alarm ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Contraception, Anxiety and Stress, Fibromyalgia, Seizures, Lyrica, Social Anxiety Disorder, Epilepsy, Pregabalin, Delivery, Performance Anxiety, Premature Labor, Hydrocephalus, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Health Tip: Keep Your Head in the Game

Posted 12 May 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Too much pressure takes all of the fun out of playing sports. The American Academy of Family Physicians suggests these relaxation techniques to calm during-game jitters: Find a quiet spot to do some deep breathing. Take a deep breath in, hold it for five seconds, exhale and repeat. Flex a muscle group and hold it for about five seconds, then relax and release it. Do this five times with different muscle groups. Visualize a peaceful, relaxing scene. Picture all of the stress going out of your body. Try visualizing your success in the game. Think positively, instead of dwelling on mistakes or losses. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Performance Anxiety

Health Tip: Your Extracurricular Teen

Posted 5 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

-- After-school activities generally are good for your teen, except when the added stress outweighs any benefit. The American Academy of Family Physicians suggests teens should: Ask questions before committing. Find out how much time the activity requires, and consider whether it fits it in with school and homework. Consider if the activity could cause school performance to suffer. Think about whether there will still be time for fun and relaxation. Pay attention after joining. If there's too much stress, have a conversation with the activity leader. There may be time to rejoin later. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Performance Anxiety

Health Tip: Watch for Mental Health 'Red Flags' in Kids

Posted 30 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Children and teens aren't immune to stress and mental health issues, and parents should be aware of potential warning signs. The American Academy of Pediatrics says don't ignore these behaviors from your children: Changes in sleep habits, whether sleeping excessively or not getting enough. Low self-esteem. Losing interest in once-enjoyed hobbies. In a sudden reversal, doing poorly in school. Losing appetite, or significant weight loss. Unusual changes in behavior, such as unexplained aggression or anger. Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder, Agitation, Agitated State, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders, Performance Anxiety, Dependent Personality Disorder

How to Tell If Your Teen Has a Mental Health Problem

Posted 29 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 – Mood swings and other challenging behaviors are normal in teens, which can make it difficult for parents to spot serious mental health problems such as depression and anxiety, an expert says. One in five teens will develop a serious mental health disorder, with most beginning by age 15. In many cases, however, they don't receive treatment until years later, according to Dr. Aaron Krasner, an adolescent psychiatrist and Transitional Living Service chief at Silver Hill Hospital in New Canaan, Conn. "Only 20 percent of children with mental disorders are identified and receive necessary mental health services. As a society, we have to do a lot better than that," he said in a hospital news release. A number of signs can alert parents to problems, Krasner said. These include significant changes in behavior at home or school, an unexpected decline in school ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Mania, Borderline Personality Disorder, Agitation, Dysthymia, Psychiatric Disorders, Performance Anxiety, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Severe Mood Dysregulation, Avoidant Personality Disorder

Health Tip: Fighting Stress

Posted 29 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

-- When you're super stressed, exercise is a great way to blow off steam, do a good deed for your body and distract yourself. The Anxiety and Depression Association of America suggests: Get exercise five days per week for 30 minutes each day. Focus on getting frequent workouts, even in short bursts, rather than waiting for a long period of free time. Enjoy walking, jogging or biking. Decide what's most enjoyable, whether a group fitness class or a workout by yourself. Download music, audiobooks or podcasts to listen to while you exercise. Ask a friend to exercise with you. Give yourself time to adjust to a new exercise routine. It often takes four-to-eight weeks to adjust and feel fitter. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Performance Anxiety

Stress Management Training May Help Cardiac Rehab Patients

Posted 22 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 21, 2016 – The addition of stress management training can make cardiac rehabilitation programs more effective, a new study indicates. "Cardiac rehabilitation programs do not routinely offer stress management, but this may change should demand increase. And because patients may be reluctant to ask for the programs themselves, the onus is on the physicians to recognize that stress management is important for the optimal medical management of patients," said study author James Blumenthal. He is a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Duke University School of Medicine, in Durham, N.C. In the study, the researchers looked at 151 heart patients, aged 36 to 84, in North Carolina. The patients received either 12 weeks of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation alone or the same program along with weekly 90-minute group sessions on stress management. The stress ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Performance Anxiety

Anxiety, Depression May Reduce Women's Success With IVF: Study

Posted 16 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 – Depression and anxiety – but not necessarily antidepressants – are associated with a lower chance of becoming pregnant through in vitro fertilization (IVF), a new study suggests. The research included more than 23,000 women in Sweden who underwent IVF since 2007. Just over 4 percent of the women were diagnosed with depression or anxiety in the two years before IVF, and/or were prescribed an antidepressant in the six months before undergoing the fertility treatment. "We found that women undergoing their first IVF treatment who either had been diagnosed with depression or anxiety or had dispensed an antidepressant had lower rates of pregnancy and live birth rates compared to women who did not suffer from these conditions or take antidepressants before beginning their IVF treatment," study first author Carolyn Cesta said in a news release from Karolinska ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Female Infertility, Dysthymia, Performance Anxiety, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Ovulation Induction, Primary Ovarian Failure, Follicle Stimulation

Could Too Much Cellphone Time Signal Anxiety, Depression?

Posted 15 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 – Some young adults who constantly reach for their smartphones might be anxious or depressed, preliminary research suggests. A study of more than 300 college students found heavier technology use was tied to greater risk for anxiety and depression, particularly among those using the devices as a "security blanket" – to avoid dealing with unpleasant experiences or feelings. Risk was not elevated, however, among young people who used smartphones simply to "escape boredom" or for entertainment, said the researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Nor were the devices themselves found to cause mental health problems. "Handheld devices, with their countless applications and entertainment options and their constant presence at our fingertips, make it easier than ever before to disconnect with the problems [and] stresses of reality, and avoid ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dysthymia, Performance Anxiety, Seasonal Affective Disorder

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