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Could Common Heartburn Drugs Up Stroke Risk?

Posted 15 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2016 – A popular category of heartburn medications – including Nexium, Prevacid, Prilosec and Protonix – may increase your risk of stroke, a new study suggests. Known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), these drugs increased people's overall stroke risk by 21 percent, said study lead author Dr. Thomas Sehested. However, the risk appears to be driven by people who take high doses, added Sehested, research director at the Danish Heart Foundation in Copenhagen. "People treated with a low dose of PPIs did not have a high risk of stroke," he said. "Those treated with the highest doses of PPIs had the highest risk of stroke." The extent of risk also depends on the specific PPI taken. At the highest dose, stroke risk ranged from 30 percent for lansoprazole (Prevacid) to 94 percent for pantoprazole (Protonix), the researchers said. Takeda Pharmaceutical, the maker of ... Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Omeprazole, Nexium, Dementia, Prilosec, Zantac, Protonix, Indigestion, Pantoprazole, Alzheimer's Disease, Ranitidine, Lansoprazole, Dexilant, Prevacid, Transient Ischemic Attack, Pepcid, Barrett's Esophagus, Aciphex

Health Tip: Is it Indigestion?

Posted 6 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If you've eaten too much or indulged in a food that's greasy, fatty or spicy, you may have an uncomfortable feeling known as indigestion. Here are common symptoms, courtesy of the Cleveland Clinic: A burning sensation in the stomach or upper abdomen. An acidic taste in the mouth. Pain in the abdomen. Occasional diarrhea. Bloatedness or gassiness. Vomiting or nausea. Growling stomach. Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Omeprazole, Nexium, Prilosec, Zantac, Protonix, Indigestion, Pantoprazole, Ranitidine, Lansoprazole, Dexilant, Prevacid, Pepcid, Tums, Milk of Magnesia, Aciphex, Caltrate, Famotidine, Duodenitis/Gastritis, Heartburn Relief

1 in 4 Hospitalized Newborns Gets Heartburn Drugs, Despite Risks

Posted 27 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 27, 2016 – Despite reported risks, nearly one in four infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are given stomach acid-suppressing drugs, researchers report. However, they noted that the use of these medications has started to decline some in recent years. A number of studies have linked the use of stomach acid-suppressing drugs in hospitalized high-risk infants with infections, necrotizing enterocolitis (a serious disease where intestinal tissue begins to die off) and increased risk of death, the researchers said. These drugs include histamine-2 receptor antagonists such as ranitidine (Zantac), and proton pump inhibitors such as esomeprazole (Nexium). Researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, analyzed data from 43 children's hospitals across the United States from 2006 to 2013. They found that nearly 24 percent of roughly 122,000 newborns ... Read more

Related support groups: Omeprazole, Nexium, Prilosec, Zantac, Protonix, Pantoprazole, Ranitidine, Lansoprazole, Dexilant, Prevacid, Pepcid, Delivery, Aciphex, Famotidine, Heartburn Relief, Rabeprazole, Zegerid, Esomeprazole, Vimovo, Zantac 150

Calcium Supplements Tied to Kidney Stone Risk in Study

Posted 13 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 – People with a history of kidney stones may have a higher risk of recurrence if they use calcium supplements, a new study finds. The findings, based on records from more than 2,000 patients, add to evidence linking calcium supplements to kidney stone risk. But researchers also said that people taking calcium under a doctor's advice should not stop on their own. "We're definitely not advocating that people stop taking calcium supplements if their doctor prescribed them for their bone health," said Christopher Loftus, the lead researcher on the study and an M.D. candidate at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine. Loftus is scheduled to present his findings next month at the American Society of Nephrology's annual meeting in San Diego. Data and conclusions presented at meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical ... Read more

Related support groups: Kidney Infections, Tums, Caltrate, Calcium Carbonate, Pepcid Complete, Arthritis Pain Formula, Rolaids, Caltrate 600 with D, Oyster, Titralac, Oyster Shell, Pyelonephritis, Titralac Plus, Os-Cal 500 with D, Calcium/Vitamin D, Citracal + D, Os-Cal, Os-Cal 500, Oysco 500 with D, Citracal Petites

Added Calcium May Not Help Older Bones: Studies

Posted 29 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 29, 2015 – Extra calcium may not protect your aging bones after all. New Zealand researchers who analyzed more than 100 previous investigations say guidelines advising seniors to consume at least 1,000 to 1,200 milligrams of calcium a day are misplaced. No proof was found that boosting calcium intake beyond normal dietary levels strengthens older bones or prevents fractures, said researcher Dr. Mark Bolland. "We've gathered all the clinical studies of calcium supplements and dietary calcium intake for both bone density and fractures," said Bolland, an associate professor in the department of medicine at the University of Auckland. "Taken together, we think this is the strongest possible evidence that taking calcium supplements will not be beneficial unless there are clear medical reasons that a calcium supplement is needed," he said. Moreover, excess calcium ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoporosis, Tums, Fracture, bone, Caltrate, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Calcium Carbonate, Pepcid Complete, Arthritis Pain Formula, Rolaids, Oyster, Titralac, Oyster Shell, Titralac Plus, Os-Cal 500, Os-Cal, Slow-Mag, Mag 64, Oysco 500, Florical, Oyster Calcium

Antacids May Improve Head and Neck Cancer Survival

Posted 2 Dec 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 2, 2014 – Using antacids to control acid reflux may improve head and neck cancer patients' chances of survival, a new study suggests. The researchers examined the effects that two types of antacids – proton pump inhibitors and histamine 2 blockers – had on head and neck cancer patients. More than two-thirds of the nearly 600 patients in the study took one or both types of the antacids after their cancer diagnosis. Acid reflux – commonly known as heartburn – is a common side effect of chemotherapy or radiation treatment, according to the researchers. Proton pump inhibitors include drugs such as Prilosec, Nexium and Prevacid, while histamine 2 blockers include drugs such as Tagamet, Zantac and Pepcid. Compared to patients who didn't take antacids, those who took proton pump inhibitors had a 45 percent lower risk of death, according to the researchers. They also found ... Read more

Related support groups: Omeprazole, Nexium, Prilosec, Zantac, Protonix, Pantoprazole, Ranitidine, Lansoprazole, Dexilant, Prevacid, Pepcid, Aciphex, Famotidine, Heartburn Relief, Rabeprazole, Esomeprazole, Zegerid, Zantac 150, Pepcid AC, Pepcid Complete

Health Tip: When Food and Drugs Interact

Posted 27 Feb 2014 by Drugs.com

-- When food and drinks interact with medication, the medication may not work sufficiently or the drug can become too powerful as the body has trouble handling it properly. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics mentions these common examples of food and drug interaction: Grapefruit juice interacts with several drugs and may affect the way the body metabolizes medication. Drugs that may interact with grapefruit juice include: some statins, antihistamines, thyroid medications, blood pressure medications, birth control pills, cough suppressants and medications that block stomach acids. Blood-thinning medications can interact with leafy green vegetables, affecting the blood's clotting ability. Natural black licorice may interact with certain blood pressure medications and blood-thinning medications. Salt substitutes can interact with ACE inhibitors and digoxin. Tyramine (found in foods ... Read more

Related support groups: Plan B, Hydrocodone, Mirena, Sprintec, NuvaRing, Provera, Nexplanon, Implanon, Depo-Provera, Codeine, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Tri-Sprintec, Yasmin, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Amlodipine, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, Plan B One-Step, TriNessa, Lutera

Acid-Reflux Drugs Tied to Lower Levels of Vitamin B-12

Posted 10 Dec 2013 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 10, 2013 – People who take certain acid-reflux medications might have an increased risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency, according to new research. Taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) to ease the symptoms of excess stomach acid for more than two years was linked to a 65 percent increase in the risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency. Commonly used PPI brands include Prilosec, Nexium and Prevacid. Researchers also found that using acid-suppressing drugs called histamine-2 receptor antagonists – also known as H2 blockers – for two years was associated with a 25 percent increase in the risk of B-12 deficiency. Common brands include Tagamet, Pepcid and Zantac. "This study raises the question of whether or not people who are on long-term acid suppression need to be tested for vitamin B-12 deficiency," said study author Dr. Douglas Corley, a research scientist and gastroenterologist at ... Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Omeprazole, Nexium, Prilosec, Zantac, Protonix, Pantoprazole, Ranitidine, Lansoprazole, Dexilant, Prevacid, Pepcid, Aciphex, Famotidine, Heartburn Relief, Vitamin B12 Deficiency, Rabeprazole, Esomeprazole, Zegerid, Zantac 150

Calcium May Cut Risk for Precancerous Colon Lesions in Some People

Posted 10 Apr 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 10 – Consuming higher amounts of calcium may lower the likelihood of precancerous colon and rectal lesions in people who are at increased risk due to variations in two genes, a new study suggests. High calcium intake did not affect risk in people without the genetic variations. The findings may help explain inconsistent results in previous research about the link between calcium intake and the risk for these lesions, called colorectal adenomas, the researchers said. They also said the findings may help identify patients who would benefit from calcium supplements or higher levels of calcium in their diet. The study of nearly 6,000 people in Tennessee found that patients with the highest calcium intake had no reduced risk for colorectal adenomas if they had no variations in two genes – KCNJ1 and SLC12A1 – that are essential in calcium reabsorption in the kidneys. ... Read more

Related support groups: Colorectal Cancer, Tums, Caltrate, Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Citrate, Citracal, Pepcid Complete, Arthritis Pain Formula, Rolaids, PhosLo, Titralac, Oyster, Oyster Shell, Calcium Acetate, Titralac Plus, Os-Cal 500, Domeboro, Os-Cal, Calcium Chloride, Calcium Gluconate

Antihistamine Meds May Raise Risk for Diarrheal Illness

Posted 29 Mar 2013 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 29 – Patients who take antihistamines to reduce stomach acid are at increased risk for infection with Clostridium difficile, a common cause of diarrhea, a new study finds. Researchers reviewed the findings of 33 previous studies that looked at C. difficile and antihistamines used to suppress stomach acid. People who took over-the-counter antihistamine drugs did not have a significantly increased risk of C. difficile infection. However, a clear link existed between histamine 2 receptor antagonists – a specific class of antihistamines – and C. difficile infection. The risk for people on these drugs – also known as H2 blockers – was greatest for hospitalized patients receiving antibiotics, said the researchers from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. The study was published online March 27 in the journal PLoS One. "It's not clear why these antihistamines increase the ... Read more

Related support groups: Zantac, Ranitidine, Pepcid, Famotidine, Heartburn Relief, Zantac 150, Pepcid AC, Clostridial Infection, Pepcid Complete, Tagamet, Zantac 75, Cimetidine, Nizatidine, Axid, Ranitidine Bismuth Citrate, Tagamet HB, Zantac 150 EFFERdose, Axid Pulvules, Zantac 300, Leader Acid Reducer

Healthy Older Women Advised Against Taking Calcium

Posted 25 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 25 – Healthy older women should not take calcium and vitamin D supplements to prevent fractures, according to a final recommendation issued Monday by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. In healthy adults, lower doses of calcium and vitamin D seem to be ineffective. As for higher doses, it's still up in the air, the government group said. The new recommendations do not apply to people who are known to be vitamin D-deficient or who already have osteoporosis, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) noted. Every year about 1.5 million fractures in the United States are attributed to osteoporosis, which is caused by a decrease in bone mass and density that makes bones fragile and more susceptible to a break. Almost half of all women older than 50 will have an osteoporosis-related fracture in their lifetime, according to the USPSTF. Calcium is one of the main ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoporosis, Tums, Caltrate, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Citrate, Citracal, Pepcid Complete, Arthritis Pain Formula, Rolaids, Oyster, Titralac, Oyster Shell, Titralac Plus, Os-Cal 500, Calcium Chloride, Os-Cal, Slow-Mag, Calcium Gluconate, Oyster Calcium

Calcium Supplements May Raise Odds of Heart Death in Women

Posted 12 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 12 – Women eating a high-calcium diet and taking calcium supplements adding up to more than 1,400 milligrams a day may be running nearly twice the risk of dying from heart disease, a large Swedish study suggests. Both men and women take calcium supplements to prevent bone loss. The new findings come on the heels of another recent study that found a similar increased risk of death related to calcium intake among men. "Many older adults increase dietary intake of calcium or take calcium supplements to prevent bone loss and there had been speculation that increased calcium intake with or without vitamin D could improve cardiovascular health," said Dr. Gregg Fonarow, an American Heart Association spokesman who wasn't involved in the study. However, a number of recent studies have suggested that higher dietary intake or calcium supplementation may not only not improve ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Dietary Supplementation, Tums, Caltrate, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Citrate, Citracal, Pepcid Complete, Arthritis Pain Formula, Rolaids, Oyster, Titralac, Oyster Shell, Titralac Plus, Os-Cal 500, Os-Cal, Slow-Mag, Calcium Gluconate, Oyster Calcium

Which Hospital Patients Need Drugs to Prevent Gastrointestinal Bleeding?

Posted 10 Jan 2013 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 10 – Researchers have developed a scoring system to help doctors determine which hospital patients can be prescribed stomach acid-suppressing drugs to prevent gastrointestinal bleeding and which patients should not be given such medications. Gastrointestinal bleeding in hospital patients is rare, but it is dangerous and potentially fatal, according to the study authors. Although the use of acid suppressants to prevent gastrointestinal bleeding in patients who are not critically ill is not widely recommended, the medications are commonly used for this purpose, said Shoshana Herzig and colleagues at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. The study was published online recently in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. The researchers analyzed data from more than 75,000 hospital patients admitted over three years and found that gastrointestinal bleeding ... Read more

Related support groups: Omeprazole, Nexium, Prilosec, Zantac, Protonix, Pantoprazole, Ranitidine, Lansoprazole, Dexilant, Prevacid, Pepcid, Aciphex, Famotidine, Heartburn Relief, Rabeprazole, Zegerid, Esomeprazole, Zantac 150, Pepcid AC, Pepcid Complete

Calcium, Vitamin D Supplements May Pose Risks for Men With Prostate Cancer

Posted 9 Aug 2012 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 9 – Although they're standard treatment for men with prostate cancer who are taking hormonal therapy, calcium and vitamin D supplements may do more harm than good, according to a new study. Men who undergo hormone-depletion therapy for prostate cancer are at risk for osteoporosis, but the supplements do not prevent this bone loss and may actually boost patients' odds for heart disease and aggressive prostate cancer, research from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center suggests. "Calcium and/or vitamin D supplementation to prevent loss of bone mineral density in these men seems so logical that no one had questioned whether it works," study co-author, Mridul Datta, a postdoctoral fellow at Wake Forest Baptist, explained in a hospital news release. "It wouldn't be so bad if there simply was no obvious benefit," added the study's lead author, Gary Schwartz, a prostate cancer ... Read more

Related support groups: Vitamin D, Prostate Cancer, Tums, Vitamin D3, Caltrate, Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Citrate, Citracal, Cholecalciferol, Ergocalciferol, Pepcid Complete, Arthritis Pain Formula, Rolaids, Oyster, Titralac, Drisdol, Oyster Shell, Titralac Plus, Hectorol, Fosteum

No One Treatment for Acid Reflux Clearly Better Than Another: Study

Posted 29 Sep 2011 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 – Medications are effective for most patients with acid reflux disease, but some surgical options may be just as effective, according to a review of studies on current treatments for this common condition. Acid reflux disease, also known as gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD, occurs when the contents of the stomach – including burning acid – chronically spill up into the esophagus, causing heartburn and other symptoms such as a persistent cough, laryngitis and asthma. Acid reflux disease may afflict as many as 4 percent of Americans, resulting not only in a sometimes significant financial drain but also more serious long-term consequences such as esophageal cancer, according to background information in the report released Sept. 23 by the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality (AHRQ), part of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. Obesity, ... Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Omeprazole, Nexium, Prilosec, Zantac, Protonix, Pantoprazole, Ranitidine, Lansoprazole, Dexilant, Prevacid, Pepcid, Aciphex, Famotidine, Heartburn Relief, Rabeprazole, Zegerid, Esomeprazole, Zantac 150, Pepcid AC

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