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White Collar Workers at Higher Odds of Death From ALS, Parkinson's

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 13, 2017 – Typically, better-paying jobs and those that require higher education are thought more desirable, but a new study suggests white collar workers have a higher risk of death from two neurodegenerative diseases. The research found that richer, better-educated people with Parkinson's disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, also called Lou Gehrig's disease), appear more likely to die from these diseases than those in lower paying or less educationally demanding work. Workers in these "high socioeconomic" occupations include mathematicians, architects, engineers, lawyers and managers, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "This is kind of an unexpected finding," said lead author John Beard, a research officer at the CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Most prior studies have focused on ... Read more

Related support groups: Benadryl, Parkinson's Disease, Diphenhydramine, Mirapex, Requip, Ropinirole, Sinemet, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Pramipexole, Cogentin, Levodopa, Cabergoline, Azilect, Bromocriptine, Emsam, Carbidopa, Benztropine, Selegiline, Neupro, Benadryl Allergy

Exercise May Be Real Medicine for Parkinson's Disease

Posted 22 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 22, 2016 – Almost any exercise is good medicine for someone with Parkinson's disease, a new study confirms. Although physical activity may seem impossible for some Parkinson's patients, the new research review reaffirms what many specialists already believe: that exercise can have a long-term impact, improving gait and reducing risk of falls, in particular. "I pretty much never see a Parkinson's disease patient without recommending exercise," said Dr. Michael Okun, medical director of the Parkinson's Foundation. He is also chairman of neurology at the University of Florida. Parkinson's disease causes the brain to produce less dopamine, which leads to a loss of movement control. Physical symptoms include shaking, slowness and stiffness, but vary widely between individuals. The review measured the combined outcomes of more than 100 studies conducted over the past 30 years ... Read more

Related support groups: Benadryl, Parkinson's Disease, Diphenhydramine, Mirapex, Requip, Ropinirole, Sinemet, Pramipexole, Cogentin, Levodopa, Cabergoline, Azilect, Bromocriptine, Emsam, Carbidopa, Benztropine, Selegiline, Neupro, Benadryl Allergy, Amantadine

Exercise Benefits People With Parkinson's Disease: Study

Posted 24 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 24, 2015 – Parkinson's disease patients who begin regular exercise earlier have a much slower decline in quality of life than those who start exercising later, a new study finds. National Parkinson Foundation (NPF) researchers looked at information from nearly 3,000 patients. More than 1,300 reported doing little regular exercise before taking part in the study. Over two years, 500 of the inactive patients began to exercise more than 2.5 hours a week. The researchers compared patients who exercised regularly for the entire two years to people who were inactive at the start of the study, but then began a regular exercise routine. The study didn't note the type of workouts, just the total amount of exercise. After two years, scores on a questionnaire that measured the impact of Parkinson's on daily life in a number of areas – including mood, movement and social ... Read more

Related support groups: Benadryl, Parkinson's Disease, Diphenhydramine, Mirapex, Requip, Ropinirole, Sinemet, Pramipexole, Cogentin, Levodopa, Cabergoline, Azilect, Bromocriptine, Emsam, Carbidopa, Benztropine, Selegiline, Neupro, Benadryl Allergy, Amantadine

Ex-Baseball Star Kirk Gibson Has Parkinson's Disease

Posted 28 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 – Kirk Gibson, who played 17 seasons of Major League Baseball and is perhaps best known for a dramatic pinch-hit, ninth inning home run to win a World Series game in 1988, said Tuesday he has Parkinson's disease. Gibson, 57, a Michigan native who played 12 seasons with the Detroit Tigers, said in a statement that "I have faced many different obstacles in my life, and have always maintained a strong belief that no matter the circumstances, I could overcome those obstacles. "While this diagnosis poses a new kind of challenge for me, I intend to stay true to my beliefs," he added. "With the support of my family and friends, I will meet this challenge with the same determination and unwavering intensity that I have displayed in all of my endeavors in life. I look forward to being back at the ballpark as soon as possible." According to the U.S. National Institutes of ... Read more

Related support groups: Benadryl, Parkinson's Disease, Diphenhydramine, Mirapex, Requip, Ropinirole, Sinemet, Pramipexole, Cogentin, Levodopa, Cabergoline, Azilect, Bromocriptine, Emsam, Carbidopa, Benztropine, Selegiline, Neupro, Benadryl Allergy, Amantadine

Parkinson's Drugs Linked to Behavior Problems in Study

Posted 30 Mar 2011 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 29 – Parkinson's disease drugs called dopamine agonists appear to cause impulse control problems in almost one-quarter of patients, says a new study. Previous research has linked dopamine agonists, which include Mirapex (pramipexole) and Requip (ropinirole), to impulse control disorders, such as gambling addiction and hypersexuality, and to compulsive behaviors, such as binge eating, overspending and excessive computer use. In this study, Mayo Clinic researchers analyzed Parkinson's disease patient records over two years. "What we found was that as many as 22 percent of patients during that two-year period had a new-onset impulse control disorder," lead investigator and neurology fellow Dr. Anhar Hassan said in a Mayo Clinic news release. The higher the dose of dopamine agonist, the more likely a patient was to develop an impulse control disorder, the researchers found. ... Read more

Related support groups: Parkinson's Disease, Mirapex, Requip, Ropinirole, Sinemet, Pramipexole, Levodopa, Cabergoline, Azilect, Bromocriptine, Emsam, Carbidopa, Selegiline, Neupro, Amantadine, Carbidopa/Levodopa, Parlodel, Stalevo, Dostinex, Rasagiline

Parkinson's Drugs Tied to Compulsive Behaviors

Posted 10 May 2010 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 10 – Medicines used to treat Parkinson's disease may increase the risk of impulse control disorders, such as problem gambling, compulsive shopping and binge eating, researchers warn. In a new study that included 3,090 patients being treated for Parkinson's at 46 movement disorder centers in the United States and Canada, the researchers found that 13.6 percent of the patients had impulse control disorders. These impulse disorders included gambling (5 percent), compulsive sexual behavior (3.5 percent), compulsive shopping (5.7 percent) and binge eating (4.3 percent), and nearly 4 percent of the patients had two or more of these disorders. Impulse control disorders were more common among patients taking dopamine agonist medications (17.1 percent) than in those not taking the drugs (6.9 percent), the study authors found. Other factors associated with impulse control disorders ... Read more

Related support groups: Parkinson's Disease, Mirapex, Requip, Ropinirole, Sinemet, Pramipexole, Levodopa, Cabergoline, Azilect, Bromocriptine, Emsam, Carbidopa, Selegiline, Neupro, Amantadine, Carbidopa/Levodopa, Parlodel, Stalevo, Dostinex, Rasagiline

Cutting Parkinson's Drug Dose Linked to Withdrawal Effects

Posted 14 Jan 2010 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 – Reduced dosages of dopamine agonists, drugs routinely used to treat Parkinson's disease, can cause symptoms similar to those experienced by addicts in withdrawal, such as anxiety, panic attacks, pain, dizziness and drug cravings, researchers say. The symptoms of what the researchers have dubbed "dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome" have been linked to a disruption in levels of dopamine in the brain, according to the study published in the Jan. 12 issue of the Archives of Neurology. "Like cocaine and methamphetamines, dopamine agonists work by stimulating the reward pathways in the brain," senior study author Dr. Melissa J. Nirenberg, said in a news release from Weill Cornell Medical Center. "For this reason, it makes sense that they would engender similar withdrawal symptoms, particularly in those with high cumulative drug exposure," explained Nirenberg, associate ... Read more

Related support groups: Parkinson's Disease, Mirapex, Requip, Ropinirole, Sinemet, Pramipexole, Levodopa, Azilect, Bromocriptine, Emsam, Carbidopa, Neupro, Selegiline, Amantadine, Carbidopa/Levodopa, Parlodel, Stalevo, Rasagiline, Requip XL, Entacapone

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