Skip to Content

Join the 'Pain / Fever' group to help and get support from people like you.

Pain / Fever News

Opioid Update: Painkiller Misuse in U.S. Doubled in Decade

Posted 24 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 24, 2016 – More bad news from the U.S. drug wars: Misuse of prescription opioid painkillers by American adults more than doubled from the early 2000s to 2013, a new government study says. Rates of addiction to powerful painkillers such as OxyContin and Vicodin also swelled during that time, according to the U.S. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). "The increasing misuse of prescription opioid pain relievers poses a myriad of serious public health consequences," said Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse, which contributed funding for the study. These consequences range from addiction and overdose deaths to use of heroin, an illicit opioid, she said. Survey results indicated more than 4 percent of adults reported nonmedical use of addictive opioids in 2012-2013. This means they took the drug without a prescription or ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Opiate Dependence, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opiate Withdrawal, Chronic Pain, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid

Health Tip: When a Child Complains of Back Pain

Posted 25 May 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Back pain is not typical in children, and can signal something more serious. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons says your child should see a doctor if your child complains of back pain along with any of these additional symptoms: Losing weight, or running a fever. Having weakness or numbness. Having difficulty walking. Having pain that travels down both legs. Developing trouble with the bladder or bowels. Having pain that interferes with sleep. Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Back Pain, Neuralgia, Sciatica, Neuropathic Pain, Scoliosis, Pain/Fever

Did Painkiller Crackdown Cause Heroin Epidemic?

Posted 13 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13, 2016 – Top U.S. drug researchers are challenging a leading theory about the nation's heroin epidemic, saying it's not a direct result of the crackdown on prescription painkillers such as OxyContin and Vicodin. The commentary, published in the Jan. 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, is unlikely to resolve the debate, as other researchers disagree with the authors' conclusion. What they likely will agree on is that heroin's popularity is soaring – with more than 914,000 reported users in the United States in 2014, an increase of 145 percent since 2007, according to background notes with the commentary. This has led to a spike in overdose deaths – more than 10,500 in 2014. Some researchers and health officials point to recent limits on prescription painkillers as a likely cause of the heroin scourge. But the commentary authors said that the rise in ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Chronic Pain, Muscle Pain, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid

Health Tip: Keeping Kids in Pain Comfortable

Posted 18 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Pain may slow a child's recovery from illness or injury. Medication can help, but there are other ways to keep kids comfortable. The University of Michigan Health System advises: Offer plenty of love, comfort and support. Soothe your child with extra hugs and cuddles. Keep your child calm and don't let him or her feel anxious, which can worsen pain. Try heat therapy or cold packs, soothing music or gentle massage. Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Infections, Headache, Back Pain, Migraine, Chronic Pain, Muscle Pain, Bacterial Infection, Influenza, Sciatica, Neck Pain, Head Injury, Breakthrough Pain, Pain/Fever, Postoperative Pain, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

25 Million U.S. Adults Struggle With Daily Pain

Posted 18 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 18, 2015 – Pain is widespread in much of America, with more than 25 million adults – 11 percent – suffering on a daily basis, a new national survey reveals. And approximately 14 million adults – roughly 6.4 percent – experience severe pain, which can be associated with poorer health and disability, researchers found. Other national studies of chronic pain have yielded similar results, said study author Richard Nahin, an epidemiologist with the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health at the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH). "What makes this study unique is that I also looked at how often adults have mild pain," he said. Nahin found that about 54 million adults – nearly one-quarter – reported "mild," but not incapacitating, pain. Whether pain is increasing nationally is difficult to say, Nahin said. But the good news is that roughly half of ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Fibromyalgia, Back Pain, Chronic Pain, Muscle Pain, Sciatica, Neck Pain, Neuropathic Pain, Knee Joint Replacement, Scoliosis, Nocturnal Leg Cramps, Frozen Shoulder, Breakthrough Pain, Pain/Fever, Postoperative Pain, Somatoform Pain Disorder

U.S. Medical Groups Join to Fight Prescription Painkiller Abuse

Posted 29 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 29, 2015 – Led by the American Medical Association, a group of 27 major U.S. medical organizations are banding together to tackle the continuing epidemic of narcotic painkiller abuse. "We have joined together as part of this special Task Force because we collectively believe that it is our responsibility to work together to provide a clear road map that will help bring an end to this public health epidemic," AMA Board Chair-Elect Dr. Patrice Harris said in an AMA news release released Wednesday. The AMA notes that the abuse of powerful narcotic painkillers – drugs such as Oxycontin and Vicodin – has become a public health crisis in the United States, with 44 people dying each day from overdoses and many more becoming addicted. In fact, a report released in December by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that fatal overdoses involving prescription ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Opiate Dependence, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opiate Withdrawal, Chronic Pain, Opana, Subutex

Spoon Measurements Behind Many Child Drug-Dosing Errors: Study

Posted 14 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 14, 2014 – Using a teaspoon or tablespoon to administer kids' medications can often lead to medication dosing errors, a new study reports. Teaspoon- or tablespoon-based medicine instructions doubled a parent's chances of incorrectly measuring the intended dosage, and also doubled the risk they would not accurately follow the doctor's prescription, the study authors found. "A move to a milliliter preference for dosing instructions for liquid medications could reduce parent confusion and decrease medication errors, especially for groups at risk for making errors, such as those with low health literacy and non-English speakers," said the study's lead author Dr. Shonna Yin, an assistant professor of pediatrics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Findings from the study were published online July 14 and in the August print issue of Pediatrics. More than 10,000 annual ... Read more

Related support groups: Tylenol, Acetaminophen, Paracetamol, Panadol, Pain/Fever, Paracetamol Teva, Tylenol Extra Strength, Q-Pap, Tylenol Arthritis Caplet, Panadol Osteo, Childrens Tylenol, Perfalgan, Panamax, Lemsip Max, Aceta, Acetaminophen Quickmelt, Q-Pap Extra Strength, Dafalgan, Aldi Hedanol Paracetamol, Pain-Eze

Health Tip: Giving Medicine to Your Child

Posted 21 May 2014 by Drugs.com

-- You want to help your child feel better by giving medicine, not make the problem worse by dosing incorrectly. The American Academy of Family Physicians offers these suggestions: Ask your pharmacist or doctor for an information sheet about any newly used medication. Ask the doctor or pharmacist to indicate on the bottle label what the medication is for. Give your child only the recommended dose of a medication. Use any measuring device given to you by the pharmacist. You do not typically need to wake your child to give medicine in the middle of the night. Medicine normally is given at specified intervals during the day only. Continue giving your child medication for the entire prescribed duration, even if your child feels better. Let your doctor and pharmacist know immediately if your child suffers a side effect to any medication. Read more

Related support groups: Pain/Fever

FDA Medwatch Alert: Acetaminophen Prescription Combination Drug Products with more than 325 mg: FDA Statement - Recommendation to Discontinue Prescribing and Dispensing

Posted 14 Jan 2014 by Drugs.com

ISSUE: FDA is recommending health care professionals discontinue prescribing and dispensing prescription combination drug products that contain more than 325 milligrams (mg) of acetaminophen per tablet, capsule or other dosage unit. There are no available data to show that taking more than 325 mg of acetaminophen per dosage unit provides additional benefit that outweighs the added risks for liver injury. Further, limiting the amount of acetaminophen per dosage unit will reduce the risk of severe liver injury from inadvertent acetaminophen overdose, which can lead to liver failure, liver transplant, and death.   Cases of severe liver injury with acetaminophen have occurred in patients who: • took more than the prescribed dose of an acetaminophen-containing product in a 24-hour period; • took more than one acetaminophen-containing product at the same time; or • drank alcohol while taking a ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Tylenol, Fever, Acetaminophen, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Excedrin, Endocet, Darvocet-N 100, NyQuil, Tylenol PM, Acetaminophen/Hydrocodone, Tylenol with Codeine, Percocet 10/325, Ultracet, Tylenol with Codeine 3

Recall: Motrin Infants' Drops Original Berry Flavor

Posted 9 Sep 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 9 – About 200,000 bottles of Motrin Infants formula, which is used to treat fever and aches and pains in children 2 years old and younger, are being recalled because they may contain tiny plastic particles, Johnson & Johnson says. The recall covers three lots of Motrin Infants' Drops Original Berry Flavor. The lot numbers of the recalled half-ounce bottles are DCB3T01, DDB4R01 and DDB4S01, the Associated Press reported. The recalled products may contain tiny bits of PTFE, which is a plastic used in Teflon coatings. It's unclear if the recalled bottles actually contain the particles, which were found in a different product during the manufacturing process, J&J's McNeil unit said, the news service reported. Both products contain the same shipment of ibuprofen from a third-party supplier, the company explained. "From our perspective, during the manufacturing process at the ... Read more

Related support groups: Fever, Pain/Fever, Motrin Infant Drops

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Fever, Pain

Related Drug Support Groups

Excedrin, Daytime, Excedrin Migraine, Excedrin Extra Strength, Goodys Extra Strength, Vanquish, Mapap Cold Formula, Uricalm Intensive, Staflex, view more... Arthriten, Vicks Dayquil Cold & Flu Relief, Comtrex Cold & Cough, Genace, naproxen / pseudoephedrine, acetaminophen / dextromethorphan / phenylephrine, acetaminophen / dextromethorphan / doxylamine / phenylephrine, acetaminophen / chlorpheniramine / dextromethorphan / phenylephrine, aspirin / chlorpheniramine / phenylephrine, aspirin / phenylephrine, acetaminophen / aspirin / caffeine, Goodys Headache Powders, acetaminophen / brompheniramine, Supac