Skip to Content

Join the 'Orthopedic Surgery' group to help and get support from people like you.

Orthopedic Surgery News

Health Tip: At Risk of a Sprained Ankle?

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

-- An ankle sprain occurs when the joint moves from its normal position, stretching and tearing nearby ligaments. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons says activities that raise your chances of getting the injury include: Working out. Walking or running on a surface that isn't level or smooth. Falling. Playing soccer, football, tennis, basketball, running and other activities that include twisting or rolling your feet. Having your foot stepped on. Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Orthopedic Surgery, Prevention of Falls, Prevention of Fractures

A Benefit of Back Pain Surgery: Better Sex

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 – Surgery for back pain can often improve patients' sex lives, researchers report. "The impetus behind our study was to initiate the process of understanding how back surgery affects patients' lives," wrote the researchers led by orthopedic surgeon Dr. Shane Burch, from the University of California, San Francisco. "An important aspect for many patients includes sex life," the researchers said. The study included 825 patients with degenerative spinal disease. Of those, 531 underwent some kind of surgery while 294 received nonsurgical treatment. Before treatment, 55 percent of the patients said they had back pain that affected lovemaking. Three months after treatment, less than 20 percent of surgery patients still had back pain during sex, compared with 40 percent of those who had nonsurgical therapy, the study found. The improvement among back surgery patients ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Back Pain, Sciatica, Scoliosis, Herniated Disc, Orthopedic Surgery, Sexual Deviations or Disorders, Radiculopathy

Surgery Not the Answer for Most Back Pain, Sports Doctor Says

Posted 3 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2, 2016 – Back pain is a common problem, but most cases can be treated without surgery, a sports medicine specialist says. Sometime during their lives, up to 80 percent of people will have back pain that lasts more than three days. The first step in treating back pain is understanding it, according to Dr. Gregory Billy, a physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist with Penn State Sports Medicine. "A physician should ask about the history of your pain, including its exact location, what makes it feel better or worse and what may have caused it," Billy said in a university news release. "A physical exam helps isolate the cause of the pain – for example, what happens when you stand, sit, lift your leg or walk?" While an MRI can help with a diagnosis, it has limitations. "Because the back changes with age, MRIs of many older adults are likely to depict damage, but the ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Surgery, Back Pain, Chronic Pain, Orthopedic Surgery, Head & Neck Surgery

Trauma Patients Not to Blame for Opioid Epidemic: Study

Posted 20 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 – Patients who survived major trauma may not be a significant factor in the U.S. opioid epidemic, a new study suggests. Almost 75 percent of major trauma patients who were prescribed narcotic painkillers such as OxyContin and Percocet had stopped using them a month after leaving the hospital. And only 1 percent were still taking the drugs on a prescription basis a year later, researchers found. "We were really surprised by how low the numbers were for long-term opiate use," study senior investigator Dr. Andrew Schoenfeld said in an American College of Surgeons news release. "It appears that traumatic injury is not a main driver for continued opioid use in patients who were not taking opioids prior to their injuries," said Schoenfeld, an orthopedic surgeon at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Misuse of prescription pain drugs has become a serious health ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Ultram, Opana ER, Roxicodone, MS Contin

Better Way to Treat Seniors' Ankle Fractures?

Posted 19 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 – A new type of plaster cast might help older adults avoid surgery for unstable ankle fractures, researchers say. "Older adults – those over 60 – are suffering an increasing number of ankle fractures from leading more active lifestyles and the rising prevalence of osteoporosis," said study author Keith Willett. "However, we know that older patients have disproportionately poor outcomes, and their quality of life can suffer as they lose mobility," added Willett. He is a professor of orthopedics, rheumatology and musculoskeletal sciences at the University of Oxford in England. Currently, two techniques are used to treat unstable ankle fractures: surgery to set and fix the bones using plates and screws; or a traditional plaster cast. "Each technique has drawbacks," Willett said in a university news release. "Traditional plaster casts are associated with misaligned ... Read more

Related support groups: Fracture, bone, Orthopedic Surgery, Prevention of Fractures

Elective Surgeries on Fridays Are Safe: Study

Posted 18 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 – People having elective surgery on Fridays are no more likely to die than people who undergo procedures any other weekday, a large Canadian study suggests. Prior studies have shown a higher risk of death among patients opting for surgery on Fridays, the authors behind the new study said. One British study found a 44 percent increase in death risk among patients who had surgery on a Friday as compared to a Monday. Canadian investigators wanted to determine whether this "weekday effect" was real. Are surgeons who operate on Fridays less experienced? Does that inexperience translate into worse outcomes? The researchers examined close to 403,000 elective, daytime surgical procedures performed by nearly 1,700 different surgeons at Ontario hospitals over a 10-year period – from 2002 to 2012. "Yes, surgeons who operate on Friday are less experienced than those that ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

When Complications Arise, Some Hospitals Get Paid a Lot More

Posted 12 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 – Medicare pays some U.S. hospitals two to three times more than others to care for older adults who experience complications after major surgery, a new analysis finds. Those higher payments aren't always associated with better clinical care, the study authors said. The findings suggest that some hospitals deal with surgical complications, such as serious bleeding, infection and kidney failure, more efficiently than others, the authors noted. "If we had found that they're spending more money, but they're actually saving people's lives, it's worth it, right?" said Dr. Hari Nathan, the study's senior author. "But that's actually not what we found," said Nathan, an assistant professor of surgery at the University of Michigan Medical School. "They're not actually getting any better outcomes," he said. Hospitals with the highest "cost of rescue" – the costs of ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Bleeding Disorder, Blood Transfusion, Orthopedic Surgery, Postoperative Albumin Loss, Renal and Genitourinary Disorders

Back Surgery Doesn't Knock All NFL Players Out of the Game: Study

Posted 9 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Oct. 9, 2016 – Most professional football players who have surgery for an injured disc in the upper spine return to play and perform at a high level, a new study contends. Researchers looked at 53 National Football League players who had surgery for a herniated disc in the upper (cervical) spine between 1979 and 2013. Most returned to play after surgery and rehabilitation, including 67 percent of those who had upper-level injuries and 72 percent with lower injuries. Recovery time was about nine months. On average, players continued playing for about three years and 44 games after surgery, the study authors said. Results of the study may help guide decisions for players who suffer these potentially career-ending injuries, according to researcher Dr. Harry Mai and colleagues. Mai is with the department of orthopaedic surgery at Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery

Encouraging Surgical ICU Patients to Get Moving Pays Off

Posted 2 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 30, 2016 – Getting out of bed and moving around as soon as possible benefits surgical intensive care unit patients, a new study shows. Among 200 surgical ICU patients in the United States, Germany and Austria, those encouraged to move around sooner than usual were discharged from the ICU and the hospital earlier than others, researchers found. "We have become much more successful in making sure patients hospitalized after serious injury or major surgery survive their stays in surgical ICUs," said study leader Dr. Matthias Eikermann, of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. "But many patients who spend a long time in the ICU develop muscle weakness that can lead to prolonged rehabilitation requirements, with some being unable to walk or take care of themselves up to a year after hospital discharge," he said in a hospital news release. Setting daily goals for each ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis

The Football Injuries Most Likely to End an NFL Career

Posted 8 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 8, 2016 – When the NFL season kicks off Thursday night with a rematch between last year's Super Bowl teams, the Carolina Panthers and the Denver Broncos, football fans will be focusing on which franchise claims victory this time around. But fears of career-ending injuries lurk in the back of the minds of professional football players every time they take the field, and a new study sheds some light on exactly what kinds of injuries can be most devastating. It turns out that tendon and ligament injuries are potentially worse than broken and dislocated bones when it comes to complete recovery, the new study showed. Tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and injured tendons in the kneecap and the Achilles heel seemed to keep players off the field or diminish their future performance more than other orthopedic injuries, the researchers found. "While these injuries [of ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Head Injury, Tendonitis, Fracture, bone, Orthopedic Surgery, Frozen Shoulder, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Knee Surgery Rarer, but Problems More Likely, for Minority Patients

Posted 18 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 18, 2016 – Minority patients in the United States are less likely to get knee replacement surgery, but more likely to have complications when they do, a new study finds. Knee replacement can be used to treat patients who have severe pain, stiffness and reduced knee function, often due to arthritis or injury. More than 600,000 knee replacements are done in the United States each year. "Even after adjusting for certain patient demographics, socioeconomic status, and health care system characteristics, significant racial disparities in [total knee replacement] utilization and outcomes exist," corresponding study author Yan Ma said. Ma is an associate professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Ma and his colleagues analyzed federal data on more than 547,000 total knee ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Is Surgery Always Needed for Meniscal Tears of the Knee?

Posted 21 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 20, 2016 – A meniscal tear is a common and disabling knee injury affecting many Americans at some point in their lives. Now, new research suggests that in many cases, exercise may work just as well as surgery to heal the condition in middle-aged people. Meniscal tears occur when damage is done to the rubbery discs that cushion the knee joint. According to the European research team, about 2 million people worldwide undergo surgeries known as knee arthroscopy each year – although there's debate over how valuable these procedures are for meniscal tears. To help settle the matter, a team led by Nina Jullum Kise, an orthopedic surgeon at Martina Hansens Hospital in Sandvika, Norway, tracked outcomes for 140 patients. These patients averaged 50 years of age and had degenerative meniscal tears, largely without any signs of arthritis. Half of the patients performed two to ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery

Get Outside, Get Moving to Prevent 'Gamer's Thumb'

Posted 19 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 18, 2016 – "Gamer's thumb" – a repetitive stress injury – can strike anyone who spends a lot of time playing video games. But taking breaks can be just what the doctor ordered, a new study suggests. "Forcefully pounding a game controller or computer mouse for hours can cause inflammation of the tendons of the hand, as well as neck and back pain," orthopedic hand surgeon Dr. Dori Cage said in a news release from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. "Parents can identify signs of gamer's thumb if a child complains about pain or locking and clicking in [their] thumb. To help reduce the risk of kids having this condition, limit their daily gaming to two hours or less," Cage suggested. Gamer's thumb is technically known as De Quervain's tendinosis. It's an inflammation of the tendons connecting the wrist to the thumb. Video game fans can develop the problem when they ... Read more

Related support groups: Orthopedic Surgery

Common Surgeries Raise Risk for Opioid Dependence: Study

Posted 12 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 11, 2016 – After knee surgery and other common operations, patients have an elevated risk of growing dependent on opioid painkillers, a new study finds. These prescription painkillers include hydrocodone (Vycodin, Lortab), oxycodone (OxyContin) and fentanyl, the narcotic implicated in the April 21 death of rock legend Prince. "For a lot of surgeries there is a higher chance of getting hooked on painkillers," said study author Dr. Eric Sun, an instructor at Stanford University School of Medicine, in Palo Alto, Calif. But Sun cautioned that the finding isn't a reason to avoid surgery. "The message isn't that you shouldn't have surgery," said Sun. "Rather, there are things that anesthesiologists can do to reduce the risk by finding other ways of controlling the pain and using replacements for opioids when possible." For the study, the researchers examined medical claims of ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Surgery, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Ultram, Opana ER

Repaired ACL More Likely to Tear Again in Young Women

Posted 9 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 7, 2016 – Female athletes younger than 25 have the highest risk for a repeat tear of the knee's anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) after surgery to repair it, a new study says. The study included just over 500 male and female athletes who underwent ACL reconstruction with a hamstring graft and were followed for two years. Their average age was 27. They were allowed to return to sports six to 12 months after surgery if they were pain-free, had equal quadriceps/hamstring strength, and had finished a rehabilitation program. "Our research noted that female patients under the age of 25 with a [smaller] graft size of less than 8 millimeters have an increased chance of re-tearing their ACL following reconstruction," study lead author Dr. Duong Nguyen said in an American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine news release. He is an orthopedic surgeon and adjunct clinical professor ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis

Page 1 2 3 Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Knee Joint Replacement, Hip Replacement, Surgery