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Orthopedic Surgery News

Smoking May Raise Risk of Complications After Joint Surgery

Posted 5 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 5, 2017 – Hip or knee replacement patients who smoke are at increased risk for infections requiring repeat surgery, researchers report. They analyzed data from more than 15,000 patients who underwent either total hip or knee replacements between 2000 and 2014. The investigators found that the overall risk of repeat surgery for infections within 90 days was only 0.71 percent. However, the risk was 1.2 percent for current smokers, compared with 0.56 percent for nonsmokers. After adjusting for other factors, the researchers concluded that current smokers' risk was 80 percent higher than nonsmokers and former smokers. The researchers also found that for both current and former smokers, the risk of 90-day hospital readmission not involving surgery rose with the number of "pack-years" smoked – a calculation of the number of packs smoked per day over a number of years. ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Nicotine, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Nicorette, Nicoderm CQ, Nicotrol Inhaler, Commit, Habitrol, Nicorette DS, Nicotrol NS, ProStep, Nicotrol TD, Nicorelief

Knee Replacement Doesn't Always Pay, Researchers Say

Posted 29 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 28, 2017 – Knee replacement surgery isn't always a game changer, according to a new study that raises questions about the increasingly common procedure. The patients who benefit most have severe osteoarthritis. But for people with milder symptoms, the expense might not be justified, researchers determined. "This study suggests we should reconsider doing this procedure on people who have more mild pain, and less severe knee arthritis and loss of function," said Daniel Riddle. He's a professor of physical therapy and orthopaedic surgery at Virginia Commonwealth University. Some in the medical community wonder if the procedure is overused, said Riddle, who wasn't involved in the study. For now, "the jury is still out," he added. In 2010, total knee replacement was the most frequently performed inpatient procedure on U.S. adults aged 45 and older, according to the U.S. ... Read more

Related support groups: Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

How Doctors Decide to Treat a Ruptured Achilles

Posted 27 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, March 25, 2017 – Whether your doctor recommends surgery for a ruptured Achilles tendon may depend partly on your age and activity level, foot experts say. The Achilles tendon is a band of tissue that runs down the back of the lower leg and connects the calf muscle to the heel bone. A rupture is a complete or partial tear of the tendon that leaves the heel bone separated or partially separated from the knee. Length of recovery from this type of injury varies depending on whether a patient undergoes surgical or nonsurgical treatment. "Treatment processes are dependent upon a patient's overall health, activity level and ability to follow a functional rehabilitation protocol," said Dr. Jeffrey McAlister, a foot and ankle surgeon in Sun City West, Ariz. Advances in treating Achilles tendon rupture were discussed by McAlister and other specialists at a recent meeting of the ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Tendonitis, Fracture, bone, Orthopedic Surgery

Physical Therapy as Good as Surgery for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Study

Posted 25 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 24, 2017 – Surgery is a common approach to treat carpal tunnel syndrome. But, physical therapy may work just as well, a new study indicates. Researchers found that physical therapy – particularly so-called manual therapy – improved hand and wrist function and reduced pain as effectively as a standard operation for the condition. Moreover, after one month, physical therapy patients reported better results than those who underwent surgery. "We believe that physical therapy should be the first therapeutic option for almost all patients with this condition," said lead study author Cesar Fernandez de las Penas. "If conservative treatment fails, then surgery would be the next option," said de las Penas, a professor of physical therapy at King Juan Carlos University in Alcorcon, Spain. Also, one extra benefit of therapy over surgery may be cost savings, he noted. Carpal tunnel ... Read more

Related support groups: Orthopedic Surgery, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Obesity May Not Compromise Knee Surgery Success

Posted 24 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 24, 2017 – Weight doesn't seem to affect whether a common type of knee surgery will be successful, a new study shows. About 15 percent of meniscal repair surgeries fail, researchers said. It's been widely believed that patients with a higher body mass index (BMI) are at increased risk for failure because more weight puts more pressure on the knee. BMI is an estimate of body fat based on height and weight. But this study of 410 patients who had meniscal repair surgery found no significant differences in failure rates between those with a normal BMI of less than 25 (considered normal weight) and those with a BMI of between 25 and 35 (up to 29.9 is overweight, and above 30 is obese). An adult who is 5 feet, 9 inches tall has a normal BMI if their weight is between 125 to 168 pounds, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If that same person weighs ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Scientists Working on Solar-Powered Prosthetic Limbs

Posted 23 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 23, 2017 – It may be possible to use the sun's energy to power artificial limbs, U.K. researchers report. The University of Glasgow team previously developed an "electronic skin" covering for prosthetic hands made from graphene, a transparent substance that is stronger than steel. Graphene's transparency allows around 98 percent of the light that strikes its surface to pass through it. This makes it ideal for gathering solar energy, the researchers explained in a university news release. In their new study, the scientists integrated photovoltaic cells into their graphene skin. Photovoltaic cells generate power when illuminated. The graphene skin requires just 20 nanowatts of power per square centimeter. That's easily provided by even the poorest-quality photovoltaic cells currently available, the Scottish team noted. Currently, energy generated by the graphene skin's ... Read more

Related support groups: Periodic Limb Movement Disorder, Orthopedic Surgery

ACL Surgery Usually Puts Athletes Back in Play: Study

Posted 23 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 22, 2017 – Most athletes who undergo reconstructive surgery for a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are able to return to sports, a new study says. Researchers from the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City followed more than 200 athletes who had ACL reconstruction there between 2009 and 2013. An average of 10 months after surgery, nearly nine out of 10 patients had resumed their sport. Of those patients, 89 percent said they had returned to their prior level of competition, the researchers reported. "Our study found that patient satisfaction was very high after ACL reconstruction, and that satisfaction correlated highly with return to a sport," Dr. Benedict Nwachukwu said in a hospital news release. Overall, 85 percent were very satisfied with the results, and 98 percent said they would undergo the procedure again if necessary, the study found. The ACL is ... Read more

Related support groups: Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Many Doctors Get Payments From Drug Companies, Study Shows

Posted 21 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 21, 2017 – Many American doctors receive payments from drug companies, but few patients know about those financial ties, a new study finds. Researchers surveyed 3,500 adult patients and then checked on their doctors in Open Payments, a government website that reports drug and medical device company payments to physicians. The study found that within the previous year, 65 percent of patients visited doctors who got payments or gifts from drug or medical device companies, but only 5 percent of the patients were aware of those doctor-industry links. Patients who visited certain types of specialists were even more likely to have seen a doctor who had been paid. For example, the rates were 85 percent among patients who saw an orthopedic surgeon and 77 percent among patients who saw an obstetrician or gynecologist. The study was published recently in the Journal of General ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Gynecological Conditions, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Smokers Prone to Problems After Joint Replacement: Study

Posted 16 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 – Quitting smoking before knee or hip replacement surgery may cut the risk of complications after surgery, a new study suggests. Instead of just telling people to quit smoking, these findings suggest that doctors should guide people into pre-surgery smoking-cessation programs for smokers, the researchers said. "We've known that smokers do worse than non-smokers after joint replacements, and now this research shows there's good early evidence that quitting smoking before surgery may improve their outcomes," said study author Dr. Amy Wasterlain. She's a fourth-year orthopaedic surgery resident at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. "Not every risk factor can be reduced before a joint replacement, but smoking status is one that should be a top priority for orthopedic surgeons and their patients," she added in an NYU news release. The study included more ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Nicotine, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Nicorette, Nicoderm CQ, Nicotrol Inhaler, Commit, Habitrol, Nicorette DS, Nicotrol NS, ProStep, Nicotrol TD, Nicorelief

Home Beats Rehab for Knee, Hip Replacement Recovery

Posted 16 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 – Patients who go straight home from the hospital following hip or knee replacement surgery recover as well as, or better than, those who first go to a rehabilitation center, new research indicates. And that includes those who live alone without family or friends, one of three studies shows. "We can say with confidence that recovering independently at home does not put patients at increased risk for complications or hardship, and the vast majority of patients were satisfied," said that study's co-author, Dr. William Hozack. He is an orthopaedic surgery professor with the Rothman Institute at the Thomas Jefferson University Medical School in Philadelphia. Hozack noted that while in the past it was "not uncommon for patients to enter a rehabilitation facility in order to receive additional physical therapy," most patients today do not end up going to a secondary ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Wound Infection

Some Hospitals May Overcharge for Hip, Knee Replacements: Study

Posted 28 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 – Some U.S. hospitals might be charging private insurers twice as much for knee and hip replacements as the implants typically cost, new research suggests. It's not clear why the discrepancy exists, and an official with a national trade association of hospitals cautioned against drawing too many conclusions from a finding that only involved one insurer. Still, study co-author Dr. Kenneth Mandl said the results raise questions, especially regarding the fact that insurers aren't told how much the implants actually cost the hospitals. "Billions of dollars are at stake when the true cost of the devices are hidden," said Mandl, director of the Computational Health Informatics Program at Boston Children's Hospital. Mandl said his team wanted to find out what happens when hospitals charge private insurers for joint implants without disclosing the model numbers or cost. ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Hip Fracture's Link to Early Death May Last Years

Posted 28 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 27, 2017 – Older people who suffer a hip fracture face a much higher risk of death soon after the injury, but the risk persists over the longer term, a large study indicates. Researchers found that the risk of death among people over 60 nearly tripled during the first year following a hip fracture. However, hip fractures were also still linked to a nearly twofold increased risk of dying eight years or more after the injury. The new findings are similar to those of previous studies on hip fracture, said study lead author Michail Katsoulis. He's a medical statistician with the Hellenic Health Foundation in Athens, Greece. Katsoulis noted that "post-operative complications, such as cardiac and pulmonary ones, have been mostly implicated for the excess short-term mortality after the fracture, that is within the first year after." Those complications included both blood clots ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Heart Disease, Hip Replacement, Fracture, bone, Orthopedic Surgery, Diabetes Mellitus

Lower Back Disk Surgeries May Benefit All Ages

Posted 23 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 – People of all ages seem to benefit from surgery for a slipped or bulging ("herniated") disk in the lower back, a new study suggests. Older patients, over the age of 65, actually seemed to experience greater lower back relief than their younger peers, the researchers found. However, the study also suggested that seniors undergoing such surgery appear to face a relatively higher risk for minor post-surgical complications. These older adults may also be more likely to have to stay in the hospital for a longer period of time following their operation. The study team, led by Dr. Sasha Gulati of St. Olavs University Hospital in Trondheim, Norway, noted that a herniated lumber disk can cause debilitating chronic back pain. The current research tracked outcomes from nearly 5,200 people under 65 years of age who had surgery on their lower back. Another 380 people were ... Read more

Related support groups: Back Pain, Herniated Disc, Orthopedic Surgery

Ultrasound Won't Help Broken Bones Heal, Expert Panel Says

Posted 23 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 – Some doctors may order a pricey ultrasound treatment – low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) – to help speed the healing of broken bones. But an international panel of experts now says there's little evidence to support the procedure. "We have moderate to high certainty of a lack of benefit for outcomes important to patients, and, combined with the high costs of treatment, LIPUS represents an inefficient use of limited health care resources," concluded the panel. The group is made up of bone surgeons, physical therapists and doctors, as well as patients who've had broken bones. The panel conducted a detailed analysis of the most up-to-date data on the subject, and published its conclusions Feb. 21 in the BMJ medical journal. According to the panel, up to 10 percent of people who suffer a broken bone face slow or complicated healing. In 1994, the U.S. Food ... Read more

Related support groups: Ultrasound, Fracture, bone, Orthopedic Surgery, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Prevention of Fractures

ACL Tears on the Rise Among Kids, Especially Girls

Posted 22 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 – As kids play sports like soccer and football with more frequency and force, many are damaging their knees, a new study finds. A common knee injury – an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear – has steadily increased among 6- to 18-year-olds in the United States, rising more than 2 percent a year over the last two decades, researchers report. These injuries peak in high school, said lead researcher Dr. Nicholas Beck. Girls have a higher rate of ACL injuries, added Beck, an orthopedic surgery resident at the University of Minnesota. Sports that involve cutting or pivoting – such as soccer and basketball – are the riskiest for ACL tears. And contact sports like football can further increase the risk. But ACL tears can occur in tennis and volleyball, too, the researchers noted. Study co-author Dr. Marc Tompkins said the researchers didn't look at why ACL tears ... Read more

Related support groups: Tendonitis, Orthopedic Surgery

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