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Orthopedic Surgery News

The Football Injuries Most Likely to End an NFL Career

Posted 8 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 8, 2016 – When the NFL season kicks off Thursday night with a rematch between last year's Super Bowl teams, the Carolina Panthers and the Denver Broncos, football fans will be focusing on which franchise claims victory this time around. But fears of career-ending injuries lurk in the back of the minds of professional football players every time they take the field, and a new study sheds some light on exactly what kinds of injuries can be most devastating. It turns out that tendon and ligament injuries are potentially worse than broken and dislocated bones when it comes to complete recovery, the new study showed. Tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and injured tendons in the kneecap and the Achilles heel seemed to keep players off the field or diminish their future performance more than other orthopedic injuries, the researchers found. "While these injuries [of ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Head Injury, Tendonitis, Fracture, bone, Orthopedic Surgery, Frozen Shoulder, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Knee Surgery Rarer, but Problems More Likely, for Minority Patients

Posted 18 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 18, 2016 – Minority patients in the United States are less likely to get knee replacement surgery, but more likely to have complications when they do, a new study finds. Knee replacement can be used to treat patients who have severe pain, stiffness and reduced knee function, often due to arthritis or injury. More than 600,000 knee replacements are done in the United States each year. "Even after adjusting for certain patient demographics, socioeconomic status, and health care system characteristics, significant racial disparities in [total knee replacement] utilization and outcomes exist," corresponding study author Yan Ma said. Ma is an associate professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Ma and his colleagues analyzed federal data on more than 547,000 total knee ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Is Surgery Always Needed for Meniscal Tears of the Knee?

Posted 21 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 20, 2016 – A meniscal tear is a common and disabling knee injury affecting many Americans at some point in their lives. Now, new research suggests that in many cases, exercise may work just as well as surgery to heal the condition in middle-aged people. Meniscal tears occur when damage is done to the rubbery discs that cushion the knee joint. According to the European research team, about 2 million people worldwide undergo surgeries known as knee arthroscopy each year – although there's debate over how valuable these procedures are for meniscal tears. To help settle the matter, a team led by Nina Jullum Kise, an orthopedic surgeon at Martina Hansens Hospital in Sandvika, Norway, tracked outcomes for 140 patients. These patients averaged 50 years of age and had degenerative meniscal tears, largely without any signs of arthritis. Half of the patients performed two to ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery

Get Outside, Get Moving to Prevent 'Gamer's Thumb'

Posted 19 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 18, 2016 – "Gamer's thumb" – a repetitive stress injury – can strike anyone who spends a lot of time playing video games. But taking breaks can be just what the doctor ordered, a new study suggests. "Forcefully pounding a game controller or computer mouse for hours can cause inflammation of the tendons of the hand, as well as neck and back pain," orthopedic hand surgeon Dr. Dori Cage said in a news release from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. "Parents can identify signs of gamer's thumb if a child complains about pain or locking and clicking in [their] thumb. To help reduce the risk of kids having this condition, limit their daily gaming to two hours or less," Cage suggested. Gamer's thumb is technically known as De Quervain's tendinosis. It's an inflammation of the tendons connecting the wrist to the thumb. Video game fans can develop the problem when they ... Read more

Related support groups: Orthopedic Surgery

Common Surgeries Raise Risk for Opioid Dependence: Study

Posted 12 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 11, 2016 – After knee surgery and other common operations, patients have an elevated risk of growing dependent on opioid painkillers, a new study finds. These prescription painkillers include hydrocodone (Vycodin, Lortab), oxycodone (OxyContin) and fentanyl, the narcotic implicated in the April 21 death of rock legend Prince. "For a lot of surgeries there is a higher chance of getting hooked on painkillers," said study author Dr. Eric Sun, an instructor at Stanford University School of Medicine, in Palo Alto, Calif. But Sun cautioned that the finding isn't a reason to avoid surgery. "The message isn't that you shouldn't have surgery," said Sun. "Rather, there are things that anesthesiologists can do to reduce the risk by finding other ways of controlling the pain and using replacements for opioids when possible." For the study, the researchers examined medical claims of ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Surgery, Methadone, Hydrocodone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Opana ER, Roxicodone

Repaired ACL More Likely to Tear Again in Young Women

Posted 9 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 7, 2016 – Female athletes younger than 25 have the highest risk for a repeat tear of the knee's anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) after surgery to repair it, a new study says. The study included just over 500 male and female athletes who underwent ACL reconstruction with a hamstring graft and were followed for two years. Their average age was 27. They were allowed to return to sports six to 12 months after surgery if they were pain-free, had equal quadriceps/hamstring strength, and had finished a rehabilitation program. "Our research noted that female patients under the age of 25 with a [smaller] graft size of less than 8 millimeters have an increased chance of re-tearing their ACL following reconstruction," study lead author Dr. Duong Nguyen said in an American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine news release. He is an orthopedic surgeon and adjunct clinical professor ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis

Electroacupuncture Helped Ease Carpal Tunnel in Study

Posted 8 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 7, 2016 – Preliminary research raises the possibility that an electrical form of acupuncture could become a useful treatment for the common wrist overuse condition known as carpal tunnel syndrome. In the study, electroacupuncture helped carpal tunnel patients with long-lasting mild and moderate symptoms when it was used with splints overnight. "For these patients, electroacupuncture produces benefits in symptoms, disability, function and dexterity," said study author Vincent Chung. He is a registered Chinese medicine practitioner and assistant professor with The Chinese University of Hong Kong. Carpal tunnel syndrome develops when a nerve becomes pinched in the wrist, and it causes symptoms like pain, numbness and tingling. Typing and diseases like arthritis can bring on the condition. It affects an estimated 3 percent of U.S. workers aged 18 to 64, according to the U.S. ... Read more

Related support groups: Orthopedic Surgery, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Minimally Invasive Hip Surgery Isn't Always the Right Choice

Posted 4 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 3, 2016 – Minimally invasive hip surgery may not always be the best option to relieve serious, ongoing hip pain, a new study suggests. Researchers found that more than one-third of people in their 60s who had the minimally invasive procedure – known as hip arthroscopy – ended up needing a hip replacement within two years. Hip arthroscopy relies on small incisions around the hip to allow for the insertion of a tiny camera, as well as surgical tools, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). Hip arthroscopy can be used to treat a number of painful conditions, the AAOS says. For example, the procedure can be used to repair torn cartilage or remove extra bone that occurs in the very earliest stages of osteoarthritis, explained Dr. Stuart Weinstein. "Hip arthroscopy has been an amazing development and has helped many patients with hip disorders," said ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Hip Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Refugees Aren't Getting Needed Surgeries

Posted 3 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 2, 2016 – Millions of refugees aren't getting the surgery they need, researchers report. "When planning to take care of refugees, much thought is put into how to house and feed and clothe people who are far from home for circumstances often beyond their control. But surgery is a basic need and nobody talks about this," said Dr. Adam Kushner, leader of a new study conducted at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. An analysis of data from the United Nations and other sources estimates that the roughly 60 million refugees worldwide may need at least 2.8 million surgeries a year. But their circumstances make it difficult to receive that type of medical care, the researchers added. The types of surgeries required range from broken bones and hernia repair to cesarean sections, cleft lips, gallbladder removal and burn care, the study found. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Hiatal Hernia, Inguinal Hernia, Surgical Prophylaxis, Cesarean Section, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Knee Replacement Patients May Be Able to Hit the Shower Sooner

Posted 27 May 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 – Knee surgery patients are usually instructed to wait two weeks after surgery to take a shower to reduce the risk of infection. But a small new study suggests this may not be necessary. Researchers found no differences in bacterial swabs from those who waited two weeks to shower compared with those allowed to shower after about two days. That's no doubt welcome news to the many patients who've struggled to find a way to bathe without getting their incision wet. The study, led by Dr. Harold Rees, an orthopaedic surgeon at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Ill., followed 32 patients. Half were randomly assigned to shower after two weeks. The other half could shower as soon as their surgical dressing was removed – typically two days after surgery. None of the patients developed a post-operative infection, the study found. And, unsurprisingly, patients ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Knee Replacement Surgery

Fastballs a Fast Track to 'Tommy John Surgery'?

Posted 26 May 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 – A new study finds that throwing a lot of fastballs may increase a pitcher's risk of an elbow injury requiring "Tommy John surgery." "Our findings suggest that throwing a high percentage of fastballs rather than off-speed pitches puts more stress on the elbow," said study author Dr. Robert Keller. "This leads to elbow fatigue, overuse and, subsequently, injury," Keller, chief resident in the department of orthopedic surgery at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, said in a hospital news release. Tommy John surgery is named after the big league pitcher who was the first to undergo the operation more than 40 years ago. Its medical name is ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstruction. The procedure involves replacing the UCL in the medial elbow with a tendon from the same arm or the hamstring area. The researchers found that 83 Major League Baseball pitchers who ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis, Epicondylitis - Tennis Elbow

Spinal Fusion Not Always Necessary for Back Pain, Studies Say

Posted 13 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 13, 2016 – Spinal fusion surgery is too often used to treat lower back pain when a simpler procedure would suffice for many patients, according to a pair of new clinical trials. People suffering from spinal stenosis – pinched nerves caused by a narrowing of the spinal canal – received similar pain relief with fewer complications when doctors performed a simpler spine surgery called decompression, as opposed to a full-fledged spinal fusion, a study from Sweden found. "Fusion was associated with longer operating time, longer hospital stay and was more expensive than decompression alone," said lead researcher Dr. Peter Forsth, an orthopedic surgeon with the Stockholm Spine Center. However, certain patients would do better with a spinal fusion, the other clinical trial concludes. That trial found that spinal fusion provided better results for low-back pain patients who ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Back Pain, Fioricet, Excedrin, Tylenol PM, Fiorinal, Orthopedic Surgery, Excedrin Migraine, Advil PM, Esgic, Headache Relief, Percogesic, Bupap, Esgic-Plus, Excedrin Extra Strength, Dolgic Plus, Acetaminophen/Butalbital/Caffeine, Aleve PM, KneeRelief, Acetaminophen/Butalbital

Injuries More Common in Teens Who Focus on Single Sport

Posted 28 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, March 26, 2016 – High school athletes who focus on a single sport may be at increased risk for knee and hip injuries, a new study suggests. "Make sure your children are getting breaks in competition," said study author David Bell, assistant professor in the Departments of Kinesiology and Orthopedics and Rehabilitation at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. "There are so many great aspects to sports participation and we don't want this information to scare athletes or parents – we just want them to be wise consumers and to participate as safely as possible," he said in a university news release. The study included more than 300 athletes at two high schools, one large and one small. About 36 percent of the athletes had high levels of sports specialization. Nearly 29 percent had moderate specialization, and about 35 percent had low specialization, the researchers said. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Fracture, bone, Orthopedic Surgery

Birth Control Pills Linked to Fewer Severe Knee Injuries in Teen Girls

Posted 23 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 23, 2016 – Teen girls who take birth control pills may be less likely to seriously injure their knees than those who don't take the pill, a new study suggests. "Young athletes currently use birth control pills for various reasons, including more predictable cycles and lighter periods," said study author Aaron Gray, an M.D./Ph.D. student at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. "Injury risk reduction could potentially be added to that list," he said, if future studies confirm what the new study found. The study did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship between birth control pills and knee injuries. The researchers only found an association between these factors. Female athletes are up to twice as likely to suffer an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury as male athletes, the study authors said. The ACL connects the top and bottom parts of the knee. ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Plan B, Surgery, Emergency Contraception, Mirena, Sprintec, NuvaRing, Provera, Implanon, Nexplanon, Depo-Provera, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Tri-Sprintec, Yasmin, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, Plan B One-Step, TriNessa

Steroid Shot for Hip Pain May Carry Infection Risk If Too Close to Surgery

Posted 2 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 2, 2016 – Patients who've received a steroid injection for hip pain should wait at least three months before having hip replacement surgery, a new study suggests. "The risk of developing an infection after surgery increased significantly in patients who had a hip replacement within three months of receiving a steroid injection," study author Dr. William Schairer, from the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City, said in a hospital news release. "However, in patients who had a steroid injection and then waited three months or longer to have the surgery, there was no increased risk at all." Steroid injections are widely used to ease pain and inflammation associated with arthritis. These injections can weaken the immune system, which could increase infection risk, the researchers explained. "Hip replacement is a common and safe procedure that relieves pain and ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Prednisone, Methylprednisolone, Prednisolone, Hydrocortisone, Medrol, Cortisone, Dexamethasone, Triamcinolone, Hip Replacement, Betamethasone, Budesonide, Decadron, Entocort, Orthopedic Surgery, Solu-Medrol, Fludrocortisone, Florinef, Entocort EC, Cortef

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