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Oral and Dental Conditions News

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Grind Your Teeth at Night? Botox Might Help

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 17, 2018 – If you're one of the millions of people who grind and clench their teeth during sleep, an injection of Botox might be the answer, a small study suggests. The condition, called bruxism, can lead to pain, headaches, jaw problems and damaged teeth. However, the researchers reported that shots of Botox into the chewing muscles in the cheek can block the signals that tell these muscles to contract, relieving the grinding and clenching. "Nighttime and daytime bruxism is a very common condition that can cause headaches, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) syndrome and dental problems that can lead to disability and adversely impact quality of life," said the study's senior researcher, Dr. Joseph Jankovic. He's a professor of neurology at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Although the cause of bruxism is still not well understood, Jankovic said, it's thought to be ... Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Botox, Bruxism, Botulinum Toxin Type B, Myobloc

Health Tip: Dental Association Supports Fluoridated Water

Posted 14 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Not every community in the United States adds fluoride to drinking water. Nonetheless, the American Dental Association supports the practice, saying fluoridated water: Helps prevent tooth decay. Protects all ages against cavities. Is safe and effective. Saves money. The average lifetime cost per person to fluoridate a community's supply of drinkingwater is less than the cost of one filling. Is natural. Fluoride is found naturally in groundwater. Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Gingivitis, Periodontitis, Prevention of Dental Caries, Teething Syndrome

Health Tip: Starting a Tooth Brushing Routine Early

Posted 8 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Tooth brushing should begin in infancy to instill lifelong habits and protect teeth throughout adulthood. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests: Start practicing oral hygiene as soon as your baby is born by wiping baby's gums with a soft, clean washcloth. Never give your baby a bottle in the crib. Choose healthy solids when introducing food to avoid tooth decay. Brush a child's teeth until the age of 3. Twice daily, use a smear of fluoride toothpaste the size of a grain of rice. Children age 3 and older may be able to brush teeth themselves with adult supervision. Twice daily, use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Prevention of Dental Caries, Teething Syndrome

Gum Disease Tied to Yet Another Deadly Illness

Posted 1 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 1, 2017 – Add one more reason to why you should brush and floss regularly: Gum disease bacteria are now tied to higher odds of esophageal cancer. The study tracked the oral health of 122,000 Americans for 10 years. It found that the presence of two types of bacteria linked with gum disease may hike the risk of the cancer. The presence of one oral bacterium in particular, called Tannerella forsythia, was tied to a 21 percent increase in the odds of developing esophageal tumors, said a team led by Jiyoung Ahn. She is associate director for population science at NYU Langone Health in New York City. Gum disease has already been linked in numerous studies to a heightened risk of the number one killer, heart disease. But an expert in esophageal cancer who reviewed the new findings stressed that researchers can't yet prove a causal link to esophageal tumors. "What is not clear is ... Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Xerostomia, Toothache, Gingivitis, Oral Thrush, Periodontitis, Prevention of Dental Caries

Can Treating Gum Disease Keep Blood Pressure in Line?

Posted 15 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 14, 2017 – Aggressively treating gum disease may help lower blood pressure in people at high risk for high blood pressure, according to new research. The study involved 107 Chinese women and men, aged 18 and older, who had pre-hypertension (blood pressure on the high end of normal) and moderate to severe gum disease. Half received intensive treatment for gum disease, and half received standard treatment. Standard treatment included basic oral hygiene instructions and teeth cleaning with plaque removal above the gum line. Intensive treatment included standard treatment as well as cleaning down to the roots of teeth, antibiotic treatment and removal of teeth, if necessary. One month after their gum disease treatment, systolic blood pressure (the top number in a reading) was 3 points lower in the intensive treatment group than in the standard treatment group. There was no ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Oral and Dental Conditions, Gingivitis, Periodontitis, Prevention of Dental Caries, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Health Tip: Recognize Symptoms of Oral Cancer

Posted 10 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Oral cancer typically is diagnosed between the ages of 55 and 64. It tends to affect more men than women, and will make up about 3 percent of all cancers diagnosed in 2017. The American Dental Association says symptoms of oral cancer may include: A mouth sore or irritation that does not go away within 3weeks. Red or white patches. A lump. Rough spots on normally smooth areas of the mouth. Unexplained ear or throat trouble. Frequent hoarseness while talking. Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Oral and Dental Conditions, Dental Abscess, Head and Neck Cancer, Prevention of Dental Caries, Salivary Gland Cancer

Health Tip: Fluoride Recommended For Young Children

Posted 2 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Everyone, even young children, should brush twice daily with a flouride toothpaste, the American Dental Association recommends. Here are the ADA's guidelines: Caregivers should brush children's teeth twice daily with fluoride toothpaste as soon as teeth begin to appear. A small smear of toothpaste, no more than the size of a small grain of rice, should be used. Children aged 3 to 6 should brush twice a day with a pea-sized portion of fluoride toothpaste. Children this age should still be supervised to prevent swallowing of toothpaste. Dentists should counsel caregivers on the correct amount of toothpaste to be used, and proper brushing technique. Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Gingivitis, Fluoride, Excessive Salivation, Periodontitis, Biotene, Prevident, Control Rx, Prevention of Dental Caries, Prevident 5000 Plus, ACT Fluoride Rinse, Pro-Den Rx, Clinpro 5000, Sodium Fluoride, Florical, Teething Syndrome, Gel-Kam, Karidium, SF 5000 Plus

Health Tip: Avoid Tooth Sensitivity

Posted 27 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

-- If a tooth delivers a sharp pain any time you brush or chew on that side, you may have a problem called tooth hypersensitivity. A recent study published in the Journal of the American Dental Association suggested that these practices be avoided: Aggressive tooth brushing. Whitening or abrasive toothpaste. Clenching the jaw. Consuming acidic drinks. Using tobacco. Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Oral and Dental Conditions, Xerostomia, Toothache, Aphthous Ulcer, Gingivitis, Oral Thrush, Dental Abscess, Excessive Salivation, Periodontitis, Stomatitis, Prevention of Dental Caries, Angular Cheilitis

Triclosan Can Linger on Your Toothbrush

Posted 25 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 25, 2017 – Triclosan – a potentially harmful antibacterial agent used in some toothpastes – accumulates in toothbrush bristles, researchers report. This means your exposure to the chemical can continue even if you switch to a triclosan-free toothpaste, the investigators warned. Triclosan is now banned in over-the-counter antiseptic soaps, gels and wipes in the United States. But the germ-busting ingredient is still allowed in toothpaste because it reportedly reduces gum inflammation, plaque and cavities, said researchers led by Baoshan Xing. He is a professor of environmental chemistry at the University of Massachusetts. Prior studies have shown that triclosan can disrupt hormones in animals and humans. It also contributes to antibiotic resistance and harms marine life, the researchers said in background notes. In this study, Xing's team simulated toothbrushing with ... Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Gingivitis, Periodontitis, Prevention of Dental Caries, Triclosan, Aktif, Gel-X, Asept, Septi-Soft, Triclotrex-B, Cadisept, Digiclean, Digiclean Slim-Line, Antiseptic Hand Soap, Sanygel, Aquasept, Bacti-Stat, Septisol, Benzocaine/triclosan

Health Tip: Breast-feeding May Help Teeth

Posted 28 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Breast-feeding has been shown to help babies fight infections and prevent asthma, childhood obesity and SIDS. It may also help both the mother's and baby's teeth, recent research finds. Children who were breast-fed exclusively for the first six months of life were less likely to have teeth alignment issues than those who were breast-fed for a shorter time or bottle-fed, the American Dental Association (ADA) says. The ADA offers this additional information: Breast-feeding may help build a better bite. It is not necessary to stop breast-feeding once your child grows teeth. Breast-feeding reduces the risk that bottle-feeding creates for tooth decay. Breast-fed babies can still get cavities, so you should wipe an infant's gums and teeth with a cloth after every feeding. Use a toothbrush once the infant's first tooth emerges. Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Gingivitis, Periodontitis, Prevention of Dental Caries, Teething Syndrome

Health Tip: Is Your Baby Teething?

Posted 20 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Most babies are born with 20 teeth below the gum line, but the process of teething typically doesn't start until about 6 months of age. Most teeth will come in before the child turns one, with the molars coming in by age three. The American Academy of Dentistry identifies these typical signs of teething: Fussiness Trouble sleeping Irritability Loss of appetite Drooling more than usual Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Excessive Salivation, Teething Syndrome

Cancer Treatment Can Affect Your Food Preferences

Posted 19 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 19, 2017 – Cancer therapies often change patients' sense of taste, which may affect what they like to eat, according to a nutrition expert. "Increased taste sensitivities are more common than a muting of taste," said Catherine Carpenter, professor of clinical nutrition at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine. "Usually, the type of taste sensitivity encountered is one of a metallic nature." Changes in tastes often influence a person's food preferences, but treatment may affect individuals differently, Carpenter noted in a university news release. "If anything, patients tend to prefer bland foods rather than spicy foods," she said. "It's important to remember that preferences may vary depending on the cancer and type of treatment. You cannot lump all cancer patients into one dietary regimen." After treatments, such as chemo or radiation therapy, a nutritionist can help ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Methotrexate, Breast Cancer, Oral and Dental Conditions, Xerostomia, Fluorouracil, Colorectal Cancer, Nausea/Vomiting - Chemotherapy Induced, Xeloda, Hydroxyurea, Mercaptopurine, Hydrea, Capecitabine, Gemzar, Gemcitabine, Dacogen, Cytarabine, Cladribine, Decitabine, Purinethol

ER Visits for These 3 Health Woes Don't Have to Happen

Posted 12 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 12, 2017 – Each year, thousands of Americans end up in hospital emergency rooms for problems that could have been avoided, new research shows. The top causes of preventable ER visits in the United States include alcohol abuse, dental problems and mental health disorders such as depression and anxiety, the new study says. ER visits could be reduced if patients had better access to dental and mental health care, according to researchers from the University of California, San Francisco. The study comes as some insurers are looking to cut back on coverage for ER visits they deem "inappropriate" or avoidable. Researchers reviewed 424 million ER visits by 18- to 64-year-old patients between 2005 and 2011. Nearly 14 million visits (3.3 percent) were avoidable, meaning patients were sent home without receiving any care. The main reasons for avoidable visits were toothaches, back ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Alcohol Dependence, Alcoholism, Dysthymia, Gingivitis, Periodontitis, Prevention of Dental Caries, Stomatitis, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Can't Afford the Dentist? You're Not Alone

Posted 7 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 7, 2017 – Nobody loves a trip to the dentist, but for many middle-aged Americans even basic dental care is now financially out of reach, a new poll finds. In fact, 28 percent don't have dental insurance, while 56 percent don't get dental care except for serious dental problems, researchers said. Even more troubling is that 51 percent of people surveyed said they didn't know how they will get dental insurance after they turn 65, said lead researcher Erica Solway. She's a senior project manager at the University of Michigan Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation. According to the poll, 40 percent said they don't get regular cleanings or other preventive care, Solway said. "For the majority of folks, cost was the main barrier to dental care," she said. Solway noted that dental clinics or dental schools often provide care at lower costs or with a sliding scale based ... Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Gingivitis, Dental Abscess, Periodontitis, Stomatitis, Prevention of Dental Caries, Teething Syndrome

Health Tip: Prepare for Your Child's Dental Procedure

Posted 31 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

-- The American Dental Association suggests you ask these questions of your dentist before your child's office procedure. Who will provide the preoperative evaluation of my child, including taking a full medical history? How long before the office visit should my child avoid food or drink? Will my child take sedating medication at home before the procedure? If so, how should I monitor the child? What experience does the sedation provider have? Does this experience meet guidelines from the American Dental Association? Does staff assisting in the procedure have current training in emergency resuscitation? Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Toothache, Gingivitis, Periodontitis, Prevention of Dental Caries

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