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Oral Allergy Syndrome News

Colleges Not Fully Prepared for Students With Food Allergies: Study

Posted 12 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 – Most colleges don't have comprehensive programs to support students with food allergies, putting them at risk for life-threatening allergic reactions, according to a new study. "Our study found that while many colleges offer support for students with food allergy in the dining hall, the same support doesn't carry over to organized sports, dormitories or social events" said lead author Dr. Ruchi Gupta, an associate professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University. "That leaves students feeling vulnerable and scrambling to inform all the various departments of their needs," she added in a news release from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). The study also found that students with food allergies are willing to help educate others on campus about food allergies. "Parents tell us they need to educate everyone, literally everyone – ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Anaphylaxis, Oral Allergy Syndrome

How to Introduce Your Baby to Food Containing Peanuts

Posted 11 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 – For parents who are unsure when and how to introduce their babies to food containing peanuts, new guidelines are on the way. The guidelines – coming soon from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) – are to be presented Friday at the ACAAI's annual meeting in San Francisco. "The first step is determining if your child is at high-risk for peanut allergy," guideline co-author Dr. Amal Assa'ad said in a college news release. "Before introducing peanut-containing foods to a high-risk infant, the infant should be seen by their primary health care provider who will determine if referral to an allergist for testing and/or in-office introduction is needed," said Assa'ad, chair of the ACAAI Food Allergy Committee. Infants with severe eczema and/or an egg allergy are at high risk for peanut allergy, according to the guidelines. Parents are ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Eczema, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Anaphylaxis, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Farm Kids Get Fewer Allergies, International Study Finds

Posted 27 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 – Growing up on a farm may help ward off allergies later in life, a new study suggests. The study also found that women who spend their early years on a farm typically have stronger lungs than their suburban or city-dwelling peers. Other research has suggested that exposure to germs and potential allergens in early childhood could protect people against allergies later. A team led by the University of Melbourne's Shyamali Dharmage put this "hygiene hypothesis" to the test. Dharmage is a professor in the Center for Epidemiology & Biostatistics. The team analyzed data from a survey of more than 10,000 adults in 14 countries in Europe, Scandinavia and Australia. Nearly 64 percent said they spent their first five years of life in a rural village, small town or city suburb. About 27 percent lived in the city and about 9 percent grew up on a farm. Kids who spent their ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Asthma - Acute, Nasal Polyps, Allergic Asthma, Nasal Polyps - Prevention, Reversible Airways Disease - Maintenance, Oral Allergy Syndrome, Reversible Airways Disease

Early Introduction of Eggs, Peanuts May Cut Kids' Allergy Risk: Study

Posted 20 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 20, 2016 – Introducing babies to eggs or peanuts early on may help reduce their risk of food allergies, a new analysis finds. Researchers reviewed 146 previous studies that examined when babies were given foods that often trigger reactions, as well as their risk of food allergies or autoimmune diseases. They discovered that the timing of food introduction may affect allergy risk, but they found no similar link for autoimmune disease. The researchers reported with "moderate certainty" that babies who were given eggs when they were 4 months to 6 months old had a lower egg allergy risk. And children given peanuts between 4 months and 11 months of age had a lower peanut allergy risk than those who were older. The study, published Sept. 20 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, said early introduction could head off 24 cases of egg allergy per 1,000 people and 18 ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Angioedema, Celiac Disease, Anaphylaxis, Nasal Polyps, Nasal Polyps - Prevention, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Food Allergies Linked to Raised Risk of Asthma, Hay Fever

Posted 14 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14, 2016 – Children with food allergies are at increased risk for asthma and hay fever, and the risk rises with the number of food allergies, new research shows. The study included information on nearly 363,000 children and teens. Half of the kids were white, and 40 percent were black. Between 7 and 8 percent had one food allergy. "For patients with an established diagnosis of food allergy, 35 percent went on to develop asthma," said study senior author Dr. Jonathan Spergel. He is chief of the division of allergy and immunology at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "Patients with multiple food allergies were at increased risk of developing asthma as compared to those with a single food allergy," he added in a hospital news release. Just over one-third of patients with food allergy went on to develop hay fever, also called allergic rhinitis, Spergel said. Those ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Asthma - Acute, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Asthma, Oral Allergy Syndrome, Reversible Airways Disease

Allergies Less Common in Kids Who Suck Thumb, Bite Nails

Posted 11 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 11, 2016 – If your kid's nail-biting or thumb-sucking habit drives you nuts, you'll be happy to hear that a new study suggests those habits may have a health benefit. Children who suck their thumb or bite their nails past preschool age may be less prone to allergic reactions when they reached adolescence, researchers said. What's more, the study found that the protective effects seemed to last into adulthood. Still no one is suggesting that kids be encouraged to take up the habits, said senior researcher Dr. Robert Hancox, of the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand. With thumb-sucking, in particular, there's some concern that it can interfere with the alignment of the teeth as they come in. "We don't wish to dismiss these concerns," Hancox said. "But," he added, "if a child has a habit that is difficult to break, maybe there is some consolation in the fact that ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Claritin, Promethazine, Allegra, Loratadine, Vistaril, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine

Health Tip: Spot Signs of Summer Allergies

Posted 6 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Think you've had a summer cold? Summer allergies might actually be to blame. Here are some warning signs of allergy, courtesy of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology: Dark circles below the eyes. Swollen adenoids that cause the face to look tired and droopy. A nasal crease, which is a line that forms on the bridge of the nose. Breathing through the mouth due to nasal congestion. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Claritin, Promethazine, Allegra, Loratadine, Vistaril, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Periactin, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine

Giving Certain Foods Early May Cut Allergy Risk

Posted 18 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 – Doctors have long warned parents to delay introducing certain foods to babies to decrease the risk of a potential allergic reaction, but a new study suggests that strategy probably doesn't help. The study of about 1,400 children found that when babies were given peanuts, eggs or cow's milk during their first year, they were less likely to become "sensitized" to those common allergy-causing foods. Being sensitized to a food means a child tests positive on a skin test. "That doesn't necessarily mean a food allergy as such, but it indicates the child is on that pathway," said the study's senior author, Dr. Malcolm Sears. The goal is to reduce the risk of sensitization, which also reduces the risk of allergy, said Sears, a professor in the division of respirology at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The study's lead author, Maxwell Tran, said this ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Purpura, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Kids From Poorer Families May Have Worse Food Allergy Care

Posted 27 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 27, 2016 – A family's income may play a big role in the type of care a child with food allergies receives, a new study suggests. The researchers found that poorer families – those making under $50,000 a year – spent less on non-allergenic foods, medical specialists and important medications, such as lifesaving epinephrine injectors. As a result, "poor people may therefore be experiencing more food allergy reactions," said study co-author Dr. Ruchi Gupta. She's the director of the Program for Maternal and Child Health at Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. The study also found that low-income families incurred an average of $1,021 in emergency and hospital costs per year, compared to $416 for those with household incomes over $100,000. An estimated 8 percent of U.S. children have food allergies, according to background information with the study. And ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Anaphylaxis, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Blooming Trees Can Bring Misery to Allergy Sufferers

Posted 21 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, March 20, 2016 – Tree pollen season has arrived, but there are a number of ways allergy sufferers can prevent or control their symptoms, an expert says. Mid-February is when blooming trees begin to flower. By the time the blossoms have fallen in April, grass pollen season is well underway. This is followed by mid-summer and fall allergens, such as ragweed, according to Dr. Jeffrey Culp. He is an assistant professor of medicine and an allergist in the asthma, sinus and allergy program at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, in Nashville, Tenn. Some allergens stick around all year long, such as pet dander, dust mites and mold, he added. Most people aren't allergic to everything, Culp said, and there are a number of ways people can deal with both indoor and outdoor allergens. The first is doing everything possible to avoid allergens, he suggested. "This can take different forms. ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Claritin, Promethazine, Allegra, Loratadine, Vistaril, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Periactin, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine

Health Tip: Are You Allergic to Your Pet?

Posted 5 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If you suspect you're allergic to your pet, be on the lookout for typical symptoms. The American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology mentions these potential signs of animal allergy: Sneezing and runny nose. Watery, itchy eyes. Nasal congestion. Itchy skin or hives. Signs of asthma, such as wheezing, chest tightness or trouble breathing. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Claritin, Promethazine, Allegra, Loratadine, Vistaril, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine

Health Tip: Struggling With Chronic Cough?

Posted 22 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Chronic cough occurs when you've been coughing steadily for eight weeks or longer. It's not always a sign of a serious health problem, but it can be annoying nonetheless. To help calm your chronic cough, the Mayo Clinic suggests: Avoiding exposure to allergens that are known to trigger your cough. Quitting smoking, which is a common cause of chronic bronchitis. Managing acid reflux, which can worsen cough. To help tame acid reflux, cut portion sizes, stay upright for several hours after eating, and sleep with the head of your bed elevated. Read more

Related support groups: Cough, GERD, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Anaphylaxis, Nasal Polyps, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Kids With Asthma, Allergies May Face Higher Heart Risk Factors: Study

Posted 8 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 8, 2015 – A new study suggests that kids with asthma or allergies like hay fever may face as much as a doubling of their risk of high blood pressure and high cholesterol – even if they aren't overweight. However, the risk to any one child remains low, experts stressed, and it's not clear whether allergic diseases directly cause these problems. It's possible that another factor – such as a lack of exercise – could play a role. Still, study author Dr. Jonathan Silverberg, said, "You have common health problems that turn out to have a lot more serious consequences in some kids." According to Silverberg, an associate professor of dermatology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, prior research has shown that adults with allergic disorders are more likely to have risk factors for heart disease. His own research has hinted at links between the ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Hypertension, Asthma, High Cholesterol, Asthma - Maintenance, Eczema, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Asthma - Acute, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease - Maintenance, Oral Allergy Syndrome, Reversible Airways Disease

Health Tip: Use Antibiotics Wisely

Posted 1 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

-- An antibiotic can be a lifesaver if you or someone you love has a bacterial infection. But an antibiotic isn't always appropriate or necessary, warns the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Here are potential risks: Causing inadvertent destruction of "good" bacteria, which may cause additional problems, such as a yeast infection or diarrhea. Causing an infection that's resistant to antibiotics and is difficult to treat. This type of infection may become severe and lead to hospitalization. Developing a serious allergic reaction that may require hospitalization. Before you use any antibiotic, make sure your doctor approves. Read more

Related support groups: Antibiotic, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Anaphylaxis, Oral Allergy Syndrome, Allergic Purpura

Allergy and Asthma Sufferers Beware as Holiday Season Kicks In

Posted 23 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Nov. 21, 2015 – There are a number of steps people with allergies and asthma can take to deal with the challenges they may face over the holidays, an expert says. "Two-thirds of allergy sufferers have symptoms year-round, so it's not just a matter of the first freeze hitting and your symptoms disappearing," Dr. Bryan Martin, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), said in a college news release. "Even after the pollen season dies down, there are environmental triggers to deal with – things like mold, dust and pet dander. The winter holidays can bring a whole new set of triggers," he explained. For example, very cold, dry air can trigger asthma, experts warn. When going outside in very cold weather, people with asthma should cover their mouth and nose with a scarf or face mask, especially if they're exercising. People with allergies and ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Claritin, Promethazine, Asthma - Maintenance, Allegra, Loratadine, Vistaril, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Flonase

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