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Oral Allergy Syndrome News

Scientists Gain Insight Into Allergies

Posted 2 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2, 2017 – Scientists report they've pinpointed which immune system cells trigger allergies. The discovery may someday lead to a blood test that improves treatment, they suggest. These cells "represent a common enemy to every allergic individual that we can now easily track," said study author Erik Wambre. He's an immunology researcher at Seattle's Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason. Allergic reactions stem from an inappropriate immune response to usually benign substances such as mold, pollen or peanuts. In the United States, almost 50 million Americans have nasal allergies, and as many as 200 die from serious food allergies a year. According to Wambre, more "biomarkers" – signs of illness that can show up in tests – are needed to improve allergy detection and assess treatment. At the moment, doctors rely on skin pricks to test your reaction to ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Xyzal

Does Your Child Really Have a Food Allergy?

Posted 24 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 24, 2017 – Many people misunderstand what food allergies are, and even doctors can be confused about how to best diagnose them, suggests a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics. It's common for people to think they have a food allergy, but the reality may be different, said Dr. Scott Sicherer, the lead author of the AAP report. "If you ask someone on the street if they have a food allergy, there's a good chance they'll say 'yes,' " said Sicherer, who heads pediatric allergy and immunology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. But a true food allergy involves an immune system reaction against a particular food, he explained. Just because you think a food upsets you, that doesn't mean it's an allergy, Sicherer said. And it's critical to distinguish an allergy from other "adverse reactions" to food, he stressed. "Some people may have an intolerance, such as ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Xyzal

Climate Change May Up Asthma Irritant, Study Says

Posted 8 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 8, 2017 – Climate change may increase people's exposure to an outdoor fungus that can damage airway cells, leading to a rise in asthma and allergy symptoms, a new study contends. The widespread fungus, called Alternaria alternata, produces spores in the dry, warm weather of late summer and early fall, said the researchers from the University of Minnesota and the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Previous research has shown that the fungus produces up to three times more spores when atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels are high. Rising CO2 emissions are thought to contribute to climate change. In some people, exposure to the spores can trigger allergy symptoms and asthma, the researchers explained. For this study, the research team exposed cells from the linings of human airways to Alternaria and found it produced more cell damage. They warned that climate change might ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Asthma, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Xyzal

Nearly 4 Percent of Americans Suffer From Food Allergies

Posted 31 May 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 31, 2017 – Millions of Americans have had to swear off shellfish, eggs, peanuts or soy to avoid allergic reactions that can range from stomach cramps to life-threatening swelling of the airways, new research shows. Approximately 4 percent of Americans have a food allergy, with women and Asians the most affected, the study found. "Recent reports suggest that food allergies are on the rise, with more food allergy-related hospitalizations in the U.S. over the last decade," said lead researcher Dr. Li Zhou. She's with the division of general medicine and primary care at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Food allergies cost the United States an estimated $25 billion annually, Zhou said. For the study, Zhou and her colleagues reviewed nearly 3 million medical records identifying more than 97,000 patients who suffered from one or more food allergies or an intolerance to a ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Angioedema, Epinephrine, Anaphylaxis, EpiPen, Nasal Polyps, Adrenalin, Primatene Mist, Septocaine, EpiPen 2-Pak, Primatene Mist Inhaler, Bupivacaine/Epinephrine, EpiPen Jr, Epinephrine/Lidocaine, Articaine/Epinephrine, Glaucon, Adrenaclick

What's the Best Seasonal Allergy Med for Your Kid?

Posted 17 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 17, 2017 – Choosing an over-the-counter allergy medicine for a child sounds easy enough. But a new survey finds that the wide range of allergy medications, along with dosing and labeling differences, can make it a challenge to select the right medicine for kids. "Parents often face an overwhelming selection of allergy medicine without clear guidelines on how to choose the right one for their child," said pediatrician Dr. Gary Freed. Freed is co-director of the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health at the University of Michigan. "If parents are unsure how to navigate allergy medication choices, they should always check with their child's health-care provider," Freed said in a university news release. Freed's group surveyed more than 1,000 parents of children aged 6 to 12 across the United States. More than half of the parents had given allergy ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Pseudoephedrine, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Phenylephrine, Fexofenadine

Ready for Spring Allergies?

Posted 30 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 30, 2017 – Spring routinely spells misery for allergy sufferers, but a recent survey reveals that most patients don't try to manage their symptoms until it's too late. The survey asked more than 1,000 adults with seasonal allergies and more than 500 parents of children with seasonal allergies how they prepared for the high pollen counts that come with warmer weather. The survey found that three out of four only thought about managing symptoms once they were experiencing those symptoms or when allergy season had already started. Also, more than half did not know what prescriptions were available to ease their allergy symptoms, while roughly a third did not know their allergy triggers or how to ease symptoms. And less than half of adults surveyed visited a doctor for advice or got a prescription for an allergy treatment before allergy season began. The survey was ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Allegra, Nasal Congestion, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Flonase, Fexofenadine

Colleges Not Fully Prepared for Students With Food Allergies: Study

Posted 12 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 – Most colleges don't have comprehensive programs to support students with food allergies, putting them at risk for life-threatening allergic reactions, according to a new study. "Our study found that while many colleges offer support for students with food allergy in the dining hall, the same support doesn't carry over to organized sports, dormitories or social events" said lead author Dr. Ruchi Gupta, an associate professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University. "That leaves students feeling vulnerable and scrambling to inform all the various departments of their needs," she added in a news release from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). The study also found that students with food allergies are willing to help educate others on campus about food allergies. "Parents tell us they need to educate everyone, literally everyone – ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Anaphylaxis, Oral Allergy Syndrome

How to Introduce Your Baby to Food Containing Peanuts

Posted 11 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 – For parents who are unsure when and how to introduce their babies to food containing peanuts, new guidelines are on the way. The guidelines – coming soon from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) – are to be presented Friday at the ACAAI's annual meeting in San Francisco. "The first step is determining if your child is at high-risk for peanut allergy," guideline co-author Dr. Amal Assa'ad said in a college news release. "Before introducing peanut-containing foods to a high-risk infant, the infant should be seen by their primary health care provider who will determine if referral to an allergist for testing and/or in-office introduction is needed," said Assa'ad, chair of the ACAAI Food Allergy Committee. Infants with severe eczema and/or an egg allergy are at high risk for peanut allergy, according to the guidelines. Parents are ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Eczema, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Anaphylaxis, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Farm Kids Get Fewer Allergies, International Study Finds

Posted 27 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 – Growing up on a farm may help ward off allergies later in life, a new study suggests. The study also found that women who spend their early years on a farm typically have stronger lungs than their suburban or city-dwelling peers. Other research has suggested that exposure to germs and potential allergens in early childhood could protect people against allergies later. A team led by the University of Melbourne's Shyamali Dharmage put this "hygiene hypothesis" to the test. Dharmage is a professor in the Center for Epidemiology & Biostatistics. The team analyzed data from a survey of more than 10,000 adults in 14 countries in Europe, Scandinavia and Australia. Nearly 64 percent said they spent their first five years of life in a rural village, small town or city suburb. About 27 percent lived in the city and about 9 percent grew up on a farm. Kids who spent their ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Asthma - Acute, Nasal Polyps, Allergic Asthma, Nasal Polyps - Prevention, Reversible Airways Disease - Maintenance, Oral Allergy Syndrome, Reversible Airways Disease

Early Introduction of Eggs, Peanuts May Cut Kids' Allergy Risk: Study

Posted 20 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 20, 2016 – Introducing babies to eggs or peanuts early on may help reduce their risk of food allergies, a new analysis finds. Researchers reviewed 146 previous studies that examined when babies were given foods that often trigger reactions, as well as their risk of food allergies or autoimmune diseases. They discovered that the timing of food introduction may affect allergy risk, but they found no similar link for autoimmune disease. The researchers reported with "moderate certainty" that babies who were given eggs when they were 4 months to 6 months old had a lower egg allergy risk. And children given peanuts between 4 months and 11 months of age had a lower peanut allergy risk than those who were older. The study, published Sept. 20 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, said early introduction could head off 24 cases of egg allergy per 1,000 people and 18 ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Celiac Disease, Angioedema, Anaphylaxis, Nasal Polyps, Nasal Polyps - Prevention, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Food Allergies Linked to Raised Risk of Asthma, Hay Fever

Posted 14 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14, 2016 – Children with food allergies are at increased risk for asthma and hay fever, and the risk rises with the number of food allergies, new research shows. The study included information on nearly 363,000 children and teens. Half of the kids were white, and 40 percent were black. Between 7 and 8 percent had one food allergy. "For patients with an established diagnosis of food allergy, 35 percent went on to develop asthma," said study senior author Dr. Jonathan Spergel. He is chief of the division of allergy and immunology at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "Patients with multiple food allergies were at increased risk of developing asthma as compared to those with a single food allergy," he added in a hospital news release. Just over one-third of patients with food allergy went on to develop hay fever, also called allergic rhinitis, Spergel said. Those ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Asthma - Acute, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Allergies Less Common in Kids Who Suck Thumb, Bite Nails

Posted 11 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 11, 2016 – If your kid's nail-biting or thumb-sucking habit drives you nuts, you'll be happy to hear that a new study suggests those habits may have a health benefit. Children who suck their thumb or bite their nails past preschool age may be less prone to allergic reactions when they reached adolescence, researchers said. What's more, the study found that the protective effects seemed to last into adulthood. Still no one is suggesting that kids be encouraged to take up the habits, said senior researcher Dr. Robert Hancox, of the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand. With thumb-sucking, in particular, there's some concern that it can interfere with the alignment of the teeth as they come in. "We don't wish to dismiss these concerns," Hancox said. "But," he added, "if a child has a habit that is difficult to break, maybe there is some consolation in the fact that ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Xyzal

Health Tip: Spot Signs of Summer Allergies

Posted 6 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Think you've had a summer cold? Summer allergies might actually be to blame. Here are some warning signs of allergy, courtesy of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology: Dark circles below the eyes. Swollen adenoids that cause the face to look tired and droopy. A nasal crease, which is a line that forms on the bridge of the nose. Breathing through the mouth due to nasal congestion. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Xyzal

Giving Certain Foods Early May Cut Allergy Risk

Posted 18 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 – Doctors have long warned parents to delay introducing certain foods to babies to decrease the risk of a potential allergic reaction, but a new study suggests that strategy probably doesn't help. The study of about 1,400 children found that when babies were given peanuts, eggs or cow's milk during their first year, they were less likely to become "sensitized" to those common allergy-causing foods. Being sensitized to a food means a child tests positive on a skin test. "That doesn't necessarily mean a food allergy as such, but it indicates the child is on that pathway," said the study's senior author, Dr. Malcolm Sears. The goal is to reduce the risk of sensitization, which also reduces the risk of allergy, said Sears, a professor in the division of respirology at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The study's lead author, Maxwell Tran, said this ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Purpura, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Kids From Poorer Families May Have Worse Food Allergy Care

Posted 27 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 27, 2016 – A family's income may play a big role in the type of care a child with food allergies receives, a new study suggests. The researchers found that poorer families – those making under $50,000 a year – spent less on non-allergenic foods, medical specialists and important medications, such as lifesaving epinephrine injectors. As a result, "poor people may therefore be experiencing more food allergy reactions," said study co-author Dr. Ruchi Gupta. She's the director of the Program for Maternal and Child Health at Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. The study also found that low-income families incurred an average of $1,021 in emergency and hospital costs per year, compared to $416 for those with household incomes over $100,000. An estimated 8 percent of U.S. children have food allergies, according to background information with the study. And ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Anaphylaxis, Oral Allergy Syndrome

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