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Onychomycosis - Fingernail News

Related terms: Fungal Infection, Fingernail, Infection, Fungal, Fingernail

Health Tip: Identifying Nail Fungus

Posted 1 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

-- A fungal nail infection may not always hurt, but it can trigger unsightly discolored nails that itch, along with surrounding toes or fingers. The American Academy of Dermatology says symptoms of a fungal nail infection include: Nails that become yellow or brown, starting at the tips and spreading across the nails. Such nails may crumble or split. Accumulation of debris underneath the nails. Eventually, the nails can detach as they pull away from the nail beds. A powdery, soft or dry texture to the nails. Read more

Related support groups: Onychomycosis - Toenail, Onychomycosis - Fingernail, Nail Dystrophy

Health Tip: Caring for Nail Psoriasis

Posted 17 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Nail psoriasis causes pitting, discoloration and thickening of the nails. So how to take care of your nails if you have the condition? Here are suggestions from the National Psoriasis Foundation: Trim your nails as short as you can, since longer nails are more prone to everyday damage. Protect your nails from injury, which can worsen psoriasis symptoms. When washing dishes, cleaning or cooking, protect your hands with a pair of cotton gloves underneath vinyl or nitrile gloves (not latex). Talk to your doctor about corticosteroid injections and other possible treatments. Read more

Related support groups: Psoriasis, Plaque Psoriasis, Onychomycosis - Fingernail, Psoriatic Arthropathy

Health Tip: Artificial Nails Can Damage Real Ones

Posted 27 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

-- You may like the appearance of artificial nails, but you may not like the way they can leave natural nails thin and brittle. Here are ways to minimize such damage, courtesy of the American Academy of Dermatology: Instead of acrylic nails, use gel nails that you can soak off rather than nails that must be filed off. Make sure your salon uses an LED light, rather than a UV light, to help artificial nails harden. An LED light emits less radiation. To prevent infection, ask the nail technician not to trim your cuticles. Consider getting artificial nails only for special occasions, rather than wearing them all the time. Read more

Related support groups: Onychomycosis - Fingernail, Nail Dystrophy

Avoid Unsightly Fungal Toenail Infections

Posted 21 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 21, 2017 – Fungal nail infections, though unsightly, are generally painless and can often be prevented, a skin and nail specialist says. "Fungal nail infections are common and tend to run in families because of an inherited tendency, although not everyone is susceptible," Dr. Joshua Zeichner said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. "Since fungal nail infections are contagious, it's important to take precautions to reduce your risk of getting an infection," Zeichner added. He's an assistant professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. Signs that you've picked up a fungus include yellow or brown nails. The nail may also lift off the nail bed, or split or crumble. So what can you do to keep this icky problem at bay? The first step is keeping your toenails trimmed short. This helps prevent debris from building up ... Read more

Related support groups: Lamisil, Terbinafine, Onychomycosis - Toenail, Ciclopirox, Onychomycosis - Fingernail, Onychomycosis, Loprox, Penlac, Lamisil AT, Hydroxypropyl Chitosan/terbinafine, Penlac Nail Lacquer, Lamisil Oral Granules, Lamisil Topical, Ciclodan, Lamisil AT Jock Itch, Terbinex, Loprox TS, Pedipirox-4, Lamisil AT Athletes Foot, Lamisil Once

Health Tip: Protect Your Hands While Gardening

Posted 26 May 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Digging and weeding can pose dangers for your hands, so use caution while working in your garden. The American Society for Surgery of the Hand suggests these precautions: Wear a pair of leather gloves to protect hands from bites, scratches, blisters, poison ivy, chemicals, fertilizers, bacteria and sunburn. Perform a different task every 15 minutes to avoid repetitive use of the same muscles. Such tasks include: raking, digging, planting, trimming or pruning. Use a small hand shovel to dig, to avoid cuts from buried debris. Make sure any sharp tool has a safety lock. Only use such as tool as intended. Practice proper body posture. And make sure your wrists are relaxed and straight (not bent) for maximum strength. Avoid tools with grooves on the handles that are meant to improve grip. If such tools don't fit your hand, they can lead to soreness and calluses. Read more

Related support groups: Onychomycosis - Toenail, Onychomycosis - Fingernail, Onychomycosis, Scrapes, Minor Cuts, Minor Skin Conditions, Minor Skin Irritation

FDA Medwatch Alert: Nizoral (ketoconazole) Oral Tablets: Drug Safety Communication - Prescribing for Unapproved Uses including Skin and Nail Infections Continues; Linked to Patient Death

Posted 23 May 2016 by Drugs.com

ISSUE: FDA is warning health care professionals to avoid prescribing the antifungal medicine ketoconazole oral tablets to treat skin and nail fungal infections. Use of this medication carries the risk of serious liver damage, adrenal gland problems, and harmful interactions with other medicines that outweigh its benefit in treating these conditions, which are not approved uses of the drug. FDA approved label changes for oral ketoconazole tablets in 2013 to reflect these serious risks and to remove the indications for treatment of skin and nail fungal infections. However, an FDA safety review found that oral ketoconazole continues to be prescribed for these types of conditions. Since the 2013 labeling change, one patient death has been reported to the FDA due to liver failure associated with oral ketoconazole prescribed to treat a fungal infection of the nails.  See the full Drug Safety ... Read more

Related support groups: Ketoconazole, Tinea Corporis, Onychomycosis - Toenail, Tinea Cruris, Diaper Rash, Tinea Barbae, Nizoral, Cutaneous Candidiasis, Tinea Versicolor, Onychomycosis - Fingernail, Tinea Pedis, Onychomycosis, Tinea Capitis, Chronic Mucocutaneous Candidiasis, Dermatophytosis, See also Cutaneous Fungal Infections, Cutaneous Sporotrichosis, Chromomycosis, Eumycetoma, Cutaneous Fungal Infection

Health Tip: End Nail Biting

Posted 20 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Nail biting is anything but healthy, and it's also unsightly. The first part of kicking the habit is to figure out the triggers that cause you to do it. The American Academy of Dermatology offers this additional advice: Gradually quit, such as by not allowing yourself to bite your thumbs, then index fingers, etc. Trim your nails short, then coat them with a bitter-tasting polish. Get regular manicures. In lieu of biting your nails, find a healthier habit. Squeeze a stress ball, or mold some clay or putty. Read more

Related support groups: Onychomycosis - Fingernail, Paronychia

Kicking the Nail-Biting Habit

Posted 21 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Sept. 19, 2015 – Maybe it's time to listen to your mother's words and stop biting your nails. That's because nail-biting isn't just an unattractive habit, it can also lead to strange-looking nails and even skin infections, a dermatologist warns. "Chronic nail-biting can cause serious problems," dermatologist Dr. Margaret Parsons, an associate clinical professor of dermatology at the University of California, Davis, said in a news release from the American Academy of Dermatology. "In addition to making the skin around your nails feel sore, repeated nail-biting can damage the tissue that makes nails grow, resulting in abnormal-looking nails," she said. "It can also leave you vulnerable to infection as you pass harmful bacteria and viruses from your mouth to your fingers and from your nails to your face and mouth." To cut down on the problem, Parsons suggested avoiding ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Anxiety and Stress, Onychomycosis - Fingernail, Paronychia

Health Tip: Recognizing Signs of Nail Fungus

Posted 18 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

-- If you frequent public showers or pools and don't always don your shoes, you may be more prone to nail fungus, a condition medically known as onychomycosis. The Mayo Clinic says common symptoms include nails that are: Unusually thick. Crumbly and brittle. Ragged. Dull with no shine. Abnormally shaped. Unusually dark. Read more

Related support groups: Fluconazole, Diflucan, Clotrimazole, Ketoconazole, Miconazole, Onychomycosis - Toenail, Nizoral, Itraconazole, Onychomycosis - Fingernail, Onychomycosis, Sporanox, Voriconazole, Mycelex Troche, Oravig, Paronychia, Noxafil, Clotrimazole Troche, Vfend, Cresemba, Onmel

Health Tip: Don't Bite Your Nails

Posted 13 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Nail biting is more than just a bad habit, it can harm your health. The American Academy of Dermatology warns against these potential side effects of nail biting: Soreness and bleeding of nearby skin. Poor nail appearance, which may be permanent if you bite your nails long enough. Infection of the nails and nearby skin. Infection of the mouth or gums. Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Onychomycosis - Fingernail

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Onychomycosis

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fluconazole, Diflucan, Lamisil, terbinafine, ketoconazole, ciclopirox, griseofulvin, itraconazole, Sporanox, view more... Penlac, Gris-PEG, Grifulvin V, Penlac Nail Lacquer, Griseofulvic, CNL8 Nail, Onmel, Ciclodan, Terbinex, Pedipirox-4, Sporanox PulsePak, Fulvicin U / F, Fulvicin P / G, Grisactin Ultra, Grisactin 250, Grisactin 500, Griseofulicin