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Genes Plus Erratic Sleep May Raise Odds for Obesity

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 10, 2017 – Yet more evidence of a link between poor sleep and excess weight: A new study finds that people who are genetically prone to obesity are more likely to be overweight if they have unusual sleep habits. "These data show that in people with high genetic risk for obesity, sleeping for too short or too long a time, napping during the day, and shift work appears to have a fairly substantial adverse influence on body weight," said researcher Dr. Jason Gill of the University of Glasgow, Scotland. Gill, who is with the university's Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, and colleagues looked at statistics on nearly 120,000 people in the United Kingdom. The investigators said they found that sleeping fewer than 7 hours a night or more than 9 hours a night boosts the risk of obesity among those who are especially prone to it because of their genes. Among those ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Drowsiness, Sleep Apnea, Narcolepsy, Hypersomnia, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Diagnosis and Investigation, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

Sleep: The Great Motivator

Posted 3 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 3, 2017 – If you really want to follow through on your New Year's resolutions, make sure you get enough sleep. That's the advice of Michigan sleep specialist Dr. Cathy Goldstein. Adequate sleep is a key component when trying to achieve goals – whether it's healthier eating, more exercise, quitting smoking, improving relationships or getting ahead at work, she said. "We definitely take sleep as a luxury; it's not," said Goldstein, an assistant professor of neurology in the University of Michigan Sleep Disorders Centers. People who don't get enough sleep are more likely to make poor food choices and to eat more, Goldstein said in a university news release. They're also less likely to feel motivated to exercise or stick to their no-smoking plan; more likely to be in a bad mood; and they're probably less productive at work, she said. Goldstein advised getting seven to eight ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Obesity, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Smoking, Diazepam, Smoking Cessation, Temazepam, Librium, Restoril, Drowsiness, Xanax XR, Sleep Apnea

Time Outdoors May Deliver Better Sleep

Posted 2 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 2, 2017 – Spending time in the outdoors may improve your sleep, a small study suggests. Researchers found that a week of winter camping reset the body's "clock" to be more in tune with nature's light-and-dark cycle. The result was longer sleep. The findings, the study authors said, add to evidence that time in the sun and the dark helps people get to sleep at a decent hour. The study also highlights how modern living – so heavy on artificial light – may thwart our sleep. "It's clear that modern environments do influence our circadian rhythms," said Kenneth Wright, the study's senior researcher. Circadian rhythms refer to the shifts in the body's biological processes that happen over 24 hours, partly in response to light and darkness. But while our ancestors may have gone to bed early and risen with the sun, that's not true today, said Wright, a professor at the ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Diazepam, Melatonin, Temazepam, Librium, Restoril, Xanax XR, Oxazepam, Halcion, Serax, Triazolam

The ABCs of Good Zzzzzs

Posted 31 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 31, 2017 – In case you don't know what makes for healthy sleep habits, a U.S.-based expert panel has defined them for you in a new report. The key indicators include: sleeping at least 85 percent of the total time spent in bed; falling asleep within 30 minutes or less; waking up no more than once a night; and being awake for 20 minutes or less after initially falling asleep. The National Sleep Foundation report also outlined research needed to identify and describe more indicators of good sleep quality among people of all ages. "The National Sleep Foundation's guidelines on sleep duration, and now quality, make sense of it all – providing consumers with the resources needed to understand their sleep," said co-author Max Hirshkowitz in a foundation news release. He is chairman of the sleep foundation. Foundation researchers said that 27 percent of people take longer than ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Diazepam, Temazepam, Nightmares, Librium, Drowsiness, Restoril, Xanax XR, Night Terrors, Sleep Apnea, Oxazepam

Health Tip: Don't Be a Night Owl

Posted 30 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

-- You know it's not healthy to get too little sleep. But going to bed earlier is no cinch. The National Sleep Foundation offers this advice: Establish the same desired bedtime each night, even on weekends. Make all electronics off-limits for 30 minutes before that time. Trim back by 15 minutes at a time if you're pushing bedtime back significantly. Exercise each day, but do so at least four hours before bed. Consider some light yoga or stretching. Avoid food, drinks, medication or tobacco products that contain caffeine, alcohol or nicotine, which can keep you awake. Prepare for sleep an hour before your desired bedtime. That means washing your face, brushing your teeth, reading or listening to music. Follow this same routine each night. Set an alarm for when it's time to start your bedtime routine and turn off any electronics. Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Ambien, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, BuSpar, Diazepam, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zolpidem, Buspirone, Melatonin, Temazepam, Lunesta

Health Tip: Make Sleep a Priority

Posted 17 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Are you sabotaging your own attempts to get more shuteye? The National Sleep Foundation suggests: Identify and correct any unhealthy sleep habits. Instead of checking your smartphone just before bed, do something relaxing, such as meditating. Prepare your bed well before bedtime. Wash and change bedsheets regularly. Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Ambien, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, BuSpar, Diazepam, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zolpidem, Buspirone, Melatonin, Temazepam, Nightmares

24-Hour Shifts Can Play Havoc With the Heart

Posted 2 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 2, 2016 – Sleep deprivation while working 24-hour shifts affects heart function, a new German study suggests. "These findings may help us better understand how workload and shift duration affect public health," said lead researcher Dr. Daniel Kuetting, from the department of diagnostic and interventional radiology at the University of Bonn. "For the first time, we have shown that short-term sleep deprivation in the context of 24-hour shifts can lead to a significant increase in cardiac contractility [the degree to which heart muscle contracts], blood pressure and heart rate," Kuetting said. The study included 20 healthy radiologists with an average age of nearly 32 years. The participants' heart function was checked before and after a 24-hour shift in which they got an average of three hours of sleep. After the shift, the participants showed significant changes in blood ... Read more

Related support groups: Fatigue, Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder, Shift Work Sleep Disorder

Web-Based Help for Insomnia Shows Promise

Posted 30 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 – People find help for all sorts of maladies online. Now, insomnia might be one of them. A web-based interactive program may help chronically sleepless individuals get needed shuteye without taking medication or spending time on a therapist's couch, a new study suggests. The six-week program uses cognitive behavior therapy techniques – a standard treatment for insomnia – to help reset sleep patterns, the researchers said. People who participated in the program "experienced significant and clinically meaningful improvements in their sleep, compared to those who were given online patient education," said lead researcher Lee Ritterband. Moreover, the results are "similar to outcomes reported in trials that included face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy," said Ritterband. He is a professor at the University of Virginia School of Medicine's department of ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Diazepam, Temazepam, Librium, Restoril, Drowsiness, Xanax XR, Sleep Apnea, Oxazepam, Halcion, Serax

Why Some Women Find Good Sleep Tough to Get

Posted 13 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 12, 2016 – Some women have trouble staying asleep, and a new small study may shed light on why. Women's internal, or circadian, body clocks run at a faster pace than men's, according to the research. It's as if women operate in a different "internal time zone," said study lead author Dr. Diane Boivin, professor of psychiatry at McGill University in Montreal. "They go to bed at a later biological time because their clock is shifted earlier, eastward," Boivin said. Boivin also directs the Centre for Study and Treatment of Circadian Rhythms at Douglas Mental Health University Institute in Montreal, a McGill affiliate. The way women sleep throughout the 24-hour circadian day also outpaces men, the study showed. Boivin said these two findings explain why women's sleep-wake cycle runs about two hours ahead of men. Women are more likely than men to report insomnia at least a few ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Sleep Apnea, Diagnosis and Investigation, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder

Health Tip: Find a Fun Alarm Clock

Posted 6 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If you have a tough time getting out of bed in the morning, a fun alarm clock that eases the transition into your day may help. Try these suggestions from the National Sleep Foundation: Look for an alarm clock that's functional, not just pretty. Make sure the buttons are easy to find when you're groggy first thing in the morning. Skip alarm clocks that emit bright blue light that can interfere with sleep. Opt for one that uses softer amber, orange or red to help you sleep more soundly. Choose an alarm clock that wakes you with a sound that you enjoy, whether that's the news, your favorite music or nature sounds. Consider one that gradually increases the volume to gently rouse you. Look for fun features that make sure you won't oversleep. Some alarm clocks have a light that turns on slowly at the time you should wake. Others vibrate the bed to help wake you. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Drowsiness, Sleep Apnea, Narcolepsy, Hypersomnia, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Jet Lag, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

Brain Relies on Two Timekeepers for Sleep

Posted 12 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 12, 2016 – Both an internal "clock" and an internal "hourglass" affect how different parts of your brain respond to sleep deprivation, a new study shows. The Belgian researchers said these findings could eventually aid in the understanding of sleep disorders, and help folks who work night shifts or those with jet lag. The study involved 33 healthy young people who volunteered to stay awake for 42 hours and have their mental sharpness tracked along the way. Sleep scientists from the University of Liege used MRI scans to chart the volunteers' brain activity as they performed tests of attention and reaction time. Not surprisingly, their performances dulled as their sleep deprivation worsened. But the brain scans revealed a complicated interaction between two basic biological processes: the body's central "circadian rhythm," which pushes people to be awake and active during ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Drowsiness, Night Terrors, Sleep Apnea, Narcolepsy, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Sleep Paralysis, Hypersomnia, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Cataplexy, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder, Jet Lag, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

Health Tip: Considering a Sleep Study?

Posted 21 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If you can't find a way to get to sleep, a sleep study may help you figure out what's behind your insomnia. The National Sleep Foundation says a sleep study may help if: Your doctor can't figure out what's causing your sleep problems. You've tried treatments for sleep issues without success. You have significant daytime drowsiness or chronic snoring. You wake up often throughout the night, or have trouble falling asleep. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Drowsiness, Night Terrors, Sleep Apnea, Narcolepsy, Sleep Paralysis, Hypersomnia, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Cataplexy, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

Mom Was Right: A Good Night's Sleep Helps Keep You Healthy

Posted 11 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 11, 2016 – In news that's sure to have mothers everywhere saying, "I told you so," scientists have confirmed that a good night's sleep may keep colds and other infections at bay. The odds that someone who sleeps five or fewer hours a night had caught a cold in the past month were 28 percent higher than for folks who regularly get more shuteye, the study found. And for other infections – including flu, ear infections and pneumonia – short sleepers had more than 80 percent higher odds of having an infection in the past month compared to those sleeping seven or eight hours, the study said. "People who sleep five or fewer hours on average are at substantially increased risk for both colds whether head or chest or other infections, compared to people who sleep seven to eight hours on average," said study researcher Aric Prather. He's an assistant professor of psychology at ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Influenza, Cold Symptoms, Sleep Apnea, Sore Throat, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder

Health Tip: Setting Yourself Up for Better Sleep

Posted 28 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Allowing your mind and body to relax before bed helps prepare you for a better night's sleep. The Harvard Medical School advises: Avoid any sleep-disrupting things, such as alcohol, caffeine or nicotine. Make sure dinner is light and early. Drink plenty of water throughout the day, but cut back before bed. Design a bedroom that is cool, dark and quiet. Create a nightly bedtime routine that is soothing and relaxing (no work, no screens). Don't go to bed until you are truly tired. If you wake in the middle of the night, turn your clock around so you can't see it. If you can't fall asleep, get up after about 20 minutes and do something relaxing. Get the most out of your morning by going outside for exposure to natural light and exercise. If you take a nap (though it's better not to), make sure it's not too close to bedtime. Set consistent times for bed and waking. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder, Shift Work Sleep Disorder

Daytime Sleepiness, Long Naps Linked to Heart Risks: Study

Posted 24 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 24, 2016 – While getting enough sleep is key to health, a new study suggests that long daytime naps may not be doing your heart any favors. The researchers found that long naps and excessive daytime sleepiness were associated with an increased risk for a combination of health problems that are collectively known as metabolic syndrome. And that can boost the risk of heart disease and diabetes. Metabolic syndrome includes conditions such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, high blood sugar and excess fat around the waist. The investigators analyzed the findings of 21 studies that included a total of more than 307,000 people. The research showed that people who napped for less than 40 minutes were not at increased risk for metabolic syndrome. In fact, those who napped less than 30 minutes had a slight decrease in risk. But there was a sharp rise in risk among those ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Sleep Apnea, Narcolepsy, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder

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