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Need More Zzzzz's?

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 24, 2017 – A good night's sleep is often elusive, but there are things you can do to boost the odds of getting some quality shuteye, sleep experts say. The first is to have regular bed and wake times, according to NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital sleep doctors Dr. Daniel Barone and Dr. Andrew Westwood. The doctors suggested going to sleep at the same time each night and waking up at the same time each morning, even on weekends and vacation days. That's because changes between workdays and days off may impair your sleep and how you feel during the daytime. Avoid caffeine in the late afternoon and evening, they advised. Instead of coffee, tea, cola and chocolate, choose water, seltzer, unsweetened decaffeinated herbal tea and other caffeine-free beverages. It's also important to eat a healthy diet and be physically active. "Regular exercise and maintaining a healthy diet that ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Caffeine, Fioricet, Excedrin, Sleep Apnea, Alert, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Cafergot, Fiorinal with Codeine, Norgesic, Keep Going, Esgic, Fioricet with Codeine, Headache Relief, Esgic-Plus, Acetaminophen/Butalbital/Caffeine

Health Tip: Slipping Back Into Sleep

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Whether it's a child, a strange noise plain or insomnia that wakes you up at night, it can be difficult to get back to sleep. The National Sleep Foundation suggests: Practice progressive muscle relaxation or deep breathing exercises. Don't look at the clock, which may worsen your anxiety. Turn it away from you and close your eyes. Think about the good things that happened to you that day. This helps calm your mind. If you still can't sleep after 20 minutes, go to another room and do something relaxing. Skip the TV and phone, and listen to music or read a book. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Shift Work Sleep Disorder

Poor Sleep in Preschool Years Could Mean Behavior Troubles Later

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 – Preschoolers who get too little sleep may be more likely to have trouble paying attention, controlling their emotions and processing information later in childhood, a new study suggests. By age 7, these sleepless kids had markedly decreased mental and emotional functioning, said study lead researcher Dr. Elsie Taveras. The children exhibited "poorer ability to pay attention, poorer emotional control, poorer executive function in general, and more behavioral problems," said Taveras, chief of general pediatrics at Massachusetts General Hospital for Children in Boston. "If you think about it, these are the basic functions of a child's life. It really has implications on their ability to perform at school and home, and in relationships with their peers," Taveras added. The researchers drew these conclusions from data gathered as part of Project Viva, a long-term ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Night Terrors

Genes Plus Erratic Sleep May Raise Odds for Obesity

Posted 20 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 10, 2017 – Yet more evidence of a link between poor sleep and excess weight: A new study finds that people who are genetically prone to obesity are more likely to be overweight if they have unusual sleep habits. "These data show that in people with high genetic risk for obesity, sleeping for too short or too long a time, napping during the day, and shift work appears to have a fairly substantial adverse influence on body weight," said researcher Dr. Jason Gill of the University of Glasgow, Scotland. Gill, who is with the university's Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, and colleagues looked at statistics on nearly 120,000 people in the United Kingdom. The investigators said they found that sleeping fewer than 7 hours a night or more than 9 hours a night boosts the risk of obesity among those who are especially prone to it because of their genes. Among those ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Sleep Apnea, Narcolepsy, Drowsiness, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Hypersomnia, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Diagnosis and Investigation, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

Health Tip: Short on Sleep?

Posted 22 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- It may be tough to find enough hours to get everything checked off of your daily to-do list. But giving up sleep to get more done may do more harm than good. The National Sleep Foundation explains how insufficient sleep affects you: Reduces cognitive function, making it more difficult to remember, focus, learn new things, solve problems and make decisions. Increases body's reaction to stress. Brings on feelings of irritability and moodiness. Reduces reaction time, affecting school or work performance and raising your risk of a car accident. Increases risk of developing high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. Makes you more susceptible to illness. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Sleep Apnea, Narcolepsy, Drowsiness, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Hypersomnia, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Jet Lag, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

The ABCs of Good Zzzzzs

Posted 31 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 31, 2017 – In case you don't know what makes for healthy sleep habits, a U.S.-based expert panel has defined them for you in a new report. The key indicators include: sleeping at least 85 percent of the total time spent in bed; falling asleep within 30 minutes or less; waking up no more than once a night; and being awake for 20 minutes or less after initially falling asleep. The National Sleep Foundation report also outlined research needed to identify and describe more indicators of good sleep quality among people of all ages. "The National Sleep Foundation's guidelines on sleep duration, and now quality, make sense of it all – providing consumers with the resources needed to understand their sleep," said co-author Max Hirshkowitz in a foundation news release. He is chairman of the sleep foundation. Foundation researchers said that 27 percent of people take longer than ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Diazepam, Temazepam, Nightmares, Librium, Restoril, Xanax XR, Sleep Apnea, Oxazepam, Halcion, Serax

Health Tip: Make Sleep a Priority

Posted 17 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Are you sabotaging your own attempts to get more shuteye? The National Sleep Foundation suggests: Identify and correct any unhealthy sleep habits. Instead of checking your smartphone just before bed, do something relaxing, such as meditating. Prepare your bed well before bedtime. Wash and change bedsheets regularly. Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Ambien, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, BuSpar, Diazepam, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zolpidem, Buspirone, Melatonin, Temazepam, Nightmares

Lack of Sleep Takes Big Bite Out of World Economies

Posted 30 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 – Too little shut-eye can have far-reaching effects – even financial ones, a new report says. Reduced productivity and an increased risk of death linked to lack of sleep among U.S. workers cost the nation's economy as much as $411 billion a year. That's more than 2 percent of the country's gross domestic product (GDP), the report revealed. Lack of sleep leads to the loss of about 1.2 million working days a year in the United States. Sleep deprivation-related productivity losses are caused by employees missing work or working at less than ideal levels, said the study authors from the RAND Corp., a nonprofit research organization. Compared to someone who sleeps an average of seven to nine hours a night, the risk of death is 13 percent higher for those who sleep less than six hours a night, and 7 percent higher for those who sleep six to seven hours a night, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Sleep Apnea, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

Violent Media Often Give Rise to Nightmares

Posted 22 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 – Watching violent movies before bed might drag some dark images into your dreams, giving you nightmares, a new study suggests. The study found that those who viewed violent media before bed were 13 times more likely to have violent dreams that night compared to people who didn't watch violence before bed. "That's a big effect," said study co-author Brad Bushman. He's a professor of communication and psychology at Ohio State University. The findings, reported in the journal Dreaming, might not sound surprising to anyone who's sat through a late-night horror flick. But when it comes to media violence, research has focused on how it might affect our waking lives – not our dreams, Bushman said. At the same time, he acknowledged that the findings don't prove violent TV shows, movies or video games cause bad dreams. People whose dreams tend toward violence may be ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Nightmares, Night Terrors

Health Tip: Making the Transition to Sleep

Posted 6 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- It can be difficult to wind down from a busy day and prepare for sleep, as your body looks for cues that it's time to wind down. The National Sleep Foundation suggests: Before bed, dim the lights. This will help your body release more of the sleep-inducing hormone melatonin. Step away from smartphones, tablets and other electronics that can emit bright light. Finish all stimulating activities well before bedtime. Drop the thermostat to 60 to 68 degrees Fahrenheit at bedtime, which should help prepare you for sleep. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Night Terrors, Drowsiness, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Hypersomnia, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

The Phenomenon of Sleep Paralysis

Posted 26 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 26, 2016 – Imagine you wake up, see a stranger running toward you with a knife and your legs won't move so there's no escape. Terrifying episodes like these are known as sleep paralysis. They're not dangerous, it's just your brain telling your body it's still in dreamland, according to Texas A&M University researchers. When you're in the stage of sleep where vivid dreams occur (known as REM sleep), your arms and legs are temporarily paralyzed so you can't act out your dreams. If you wake up during this REM stage, you feel unable to move and may even hallucinate, the researchers said. "When people have a nightmare, they sleep, have a dream and then wake up. When they're experiencing sleep paralysis, they may have a dream when they are already awake," said Dr. Steven Bender, director of Texas A&M University's Center for Facial Pain and Sleep Medicine. "Sleep paralysis is a ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Nightmares, Narcolepsy, Night Terrors, Drowsiness, Sleep Paralysis, Hypersomnia

Health Tip: Find a Fun Alarm Clock

Posted 6 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If you have a tough time getting out of bed in the morning, a fun alarm clock that eases the transition into your day may help. Try these suggestions from the National Sleep Foundation: Look for an alarm clock that's functional, not just pretty. Make sure the buttons are easy to find when you're groggy first thing in the morning. Skip alarm clocks that emit bright blue light that can interfere with sleep. Opt for one that uses softer amber, orange or red to help you sleep more soundly. Choose an alarm clock that wakes you with a sound that you enjoy, whether that's the news, your favorite music or nature sounds. Consider one that gradually increases the volume to gently rouse you. Look for fun features that make sure you won't oversleep. Some alarm clocks have a light that turns on slowly at the time you should wake. Others vibrate the bed to help wake you. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Sleep Apnea, Narcolepsy, Drowsiness, Hypersomnia, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Jet Lag, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

Health Tip: Early to Bed Before Back to School

Posted 22 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

-- The first days back to school are a tough transition for many kids and parents. Making sure they are well rested before the first day can help. The National Sleep Foundation recommends: Returning to the normal school-year sleep and wake schedule about two weeks before the start of school. Back up bedtime by about 15 minutes each night and wake time about 15 minutes each morning. Maintaining the same sleep schedule throughout the school year, even on weekends. Promoting quiet time for relaxing, including books, soft music and a bath or shower before bed. Limiting screen time, heavy meals and caffeine before bed. Making sure your child's bedroom is cool, quiet, dark and free from distractions. Following these rules yourself to set a good example. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares

Health Tip: Squash Stress Before Bed

Posted 19 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Stress can keep you awake at night, even if you feel tired. The National Sleep Foundation suggests: Practice yoga, meditation or deep breathing before bed, to help you feel more relaxed. Avoid TV or computers before bed, These devices can stimulate your brain and make it more difficult to fall asleep. Enjoy a soothing mug of chamomile tea. Take a shower or bath. Perform leg exercises, such as squats, to promote blood flow to the legs. Count sheep or breathe deeply. Or imagine yourself already asleep. Earlier in the day, make time to exercise. If there's something you're worried about it, think through it during the day. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares

Brain Relies on Two Timekeepers for Sleep

Posted 12 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 12, 2016 – Both an internal "clock" and an internal "hourglass" affect how different parts of your brain respond to sleep deprivation, a new study shows. The Belgian researchers said these findings could eventually aid in the understanding of sleep disorders, and help folks who work night shifts or those with jet lag. The study involved 33 healthy young people who volunteered to stay awake for 42 hours and have their mental sharpness tracked along the way. Sleep scientists from the University of Liege used MRI scans to chart the volunteers' brain activity as they performed tests of attention and reaction time. Not surprisingly, their performances dulled as their sleep deprivation worsened. But the brain scans revealed a complicated interaction between two basic biological processes: the body's central "circadian rhythm," which pushes people to be awake and active during ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Sleep Apnea, Narcolepsy, Night Terrors, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Drowsiness, Sleep Paralysis, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Cataplexy, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Hypersomnia, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder, Jet Lag, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

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