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Many Depressed Adults Not Getting Treatment: Study

Posted 29 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 29, 2016 – Most American adults who suffer from depression aren't getting treatment, a new study finds. After screening survey data on more than 46,000 people, researchers found that 8 percent had depression, but only a third were being treated for the mood disorder. The reasons why were varied. "Some adults who experience depressive symptoms do not believe they are significant and require medical attention, or that they could benefit from treatment," said lead researcher Dr. Mark Olfson. For others, stigma or shame interferes with a desire to get professional help, said Olfson, a professor of psychiatry at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University in New York City. "In still other cases, the medical visits are oriented around more pressing and urgent medical problems, and the clinical opportunities to detect depression are missed," he said. The survey ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Wellbutrin, Effexor, Prozac, Celexa, Citalopram, Paxil, Major Depressive Disorder, Sertraline, Pristiq, Amitriptyline, Bupropion, Viibryd, Fluoxetine, Venlafaxine, Effexor XR, Mirtazapine

Gay, Lesbian Teens More Likely to Suffer Rapes, Attacks: CDC

Posted 12 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 12, 2016 – Lesbian, gay, and bisexual high school students are much more likely to be victims of physical and sexual violence and bullying, and more needs to be done to protect them, a new U.S. government study says. "These tragic disparities call for accelerated action by public health and education agencies, communities, and families to protect the lives of lesbian, gay and bisexual youth," said Dr. Jonathan Mermin. He is director of the National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Getting a better assessment of the extent of the problem, "is critical to protect the health and well-being of more than one million lesbian, gay and bisexual high school students," he added in an agency news release. The CDC report found that lesbian and gay students were much more likely than heterosexual ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Postpartum Depression, Dysthymia, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Neurotic Depression, Depressive Psychosis

Serious Infections Tied to Suicide Risk

Posted 10 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 10, 2016 – People hospitalized for serious infections may face an increased risk of dying by suicide, and researchers suspect there's a biological reason for it. In a study of over 7 million people, Danish researchers found that those who'd been hospitalized for infections were 42 percent more likely to die of suicide compared to people with no history of serious infection. People hospitalized for HIV/AIDS or the liver infection hepatitis showed the highest risk – more than twice that of people without those diseases, the study found. Although the study couldn't prove a cause-and-effect link, the study authors and at least one other brain health expert think the increased risk of suicide after infection might not simply reflect the psychological impact of serious illness. Instead, infections might directly contribute to suicide risk by causing inflammation in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Hepatitis C, HIV Infection, Postpartum Depression, Hepatitis B, Dysthymia, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Hepatitis A, Neurotic Depression, Depressive Psychosis, Chronic Active Hepatitis, Infectious Hepatitis

Depression Can Stalk Families Through Generations

Posted 10 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 10, 2016 – People whose parents and grandparents suffered from depression are at much higher risk of developing the illness, a new study suggests. The research found that if a person's grandparent and parent each had depression, their own odds for the disorder tripled. "In this study, biological offspring with two previous generations affected with major depression were at highest risk for major depression," concluded a team led by Myrna Weissman of Columbia University and the New York State Psychiatric Institute, in New York City. One expert in brain health stressed, however, that depression is never inevitable, even for members of families with a history of the disease. "While family history increases the risk factor for depression, it does not mean that someone will definitely become depressed," said Dr. Jeffrey Borenstein, president of the Brain & Behavior Research ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Postpartum Depression, Dysthymia, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Neurotic Depression, Depressive Psychosis

Could New 'Talk Therapy' Cut Cost of Treating Depression?

Posted 23 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 22, 2016 – A simpler and less expensive form of talk therapy is as effective as the gold-standard treatment – cognitive behavioral therapy – for treating depression in adults, a new study suggests. The researchers found that so-called behavioral activation therapy treats depression just as well as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). But behavioral activation can be provided by mental health workers with minimal training and is significantly cheaper, the study authors contended. Cognitive behavioral therapy is provided by highly trained and highly paid specialists. In many countries, CBT is available only to patients who can afford it or who have health insurance, and waiting lists can be long. For example, in the United States, only about one-fourth of people with depression have received any form of psychological therapy in the last 12 months, the researchers said. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Effexor, Prozac, Celexa, Citalopram, Paxil, Major Depressive Disorder, Sertraline, Pristiq, Amitriptyline, Fluoxetine, Venlafaxine, Effexor XR, Mirtazapine, Savella, Escitalopram, Remeron

Religion a Buffer Against Suicide for Women, Study Suggests

Posted 29 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 29, 2016 – Women who regularly attend religious services may have a lower risk of suicide than those who don't, a new study suggests. U.S. researchers reviewed data on nearly 90,000 women. They were enrolled in the Nurses' Health Study from 1996 to 2010. During that time, there were 36 suicides. About 19 percent of women in the study attended religious services more than once a week. Around 41 percent attended once a week. Approximately 16 percent attended services less than once a week, and about 24 percent never attended religious services, the study found. Women who attended religious services at least once a week had a five times lower risk of suicide than those who never attended services, the study showed. However, the study could only show an association and not a cause-and-effect relationship. The study authors also noted that most of the women in the study were ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Dysthymia, Neurotic Depression, Depressive Psychosis

Job Hunting? Maybe a Therapist Can Help

Posted 20 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 20, 2016 – The unemployed may find help for their job search in an unexpected place – a therapist's office. A type of counseling called cognitive behavioral therapy teaches skills that might help people who are unemployed get a job, a new study suggests. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be used to help people with depression. This type of therapy teaches people to identify negative thoughts and replace them with positive ones. "Searching for a job is difficult in any circumstance, but it may be even more difficult for people who are depressed," said study co-author Daniel Strunk, an associate professor of psychology at Ohio State University. "But we found that there are specific skills that can help not only manage the symptoms of depression but also make it more likely that a person will receive a job offer," Strunk said in a university news release. The study ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Postpartum Depression, Dysthymia, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Neurotic Depression, Depressive Psychosis

Study Questions Use of Antidepressants for Children, Teens

Posted 9 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 8, 2016 – Treating children and teens suffering from depression with antidepressants may be both ineffective and potentially dangerous, a new analysis suggests. Of the 14 antidepressants studied, only fluoxetine (Prozac) was more effective in treating depression than an inactive placebo in children and teens, the review found. And Effexor (venlafaxine) was linked to a higher risk of suicidal thoughts and attempts compared to a placebo and five other antidepressants, the researchers reported. "In the clinical care of young people with major depressive disorder, clinical guidelines recommend psychotherapy – especially cognitive behavioral therapy or interpersonal therapy – as the first-line treatment," said study author Dr. Andrea Cipriani. He is an associate professor in the department of psychiatry at the University of Oxford, in England. Major depression affects ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Lexapro, Zoloft, Effexor, Prozac, Celexa, Citalopram, Paxil, Major Depressive Disorder, Sertraline, Amitriptyline, Fluoxetine, Venlafaxine, Effexor XR, Escitalopram, Nortriptyline, Elavil, Paroxetine, Luvox, Doxepin

Among U.S. Military, Army Members Face Highest Suicide Risk

Posted 6 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 6, 2016 – Suicide rates have been increasing among all active U.S. Navy, Air Force and Army personnel, but those in the Army appear to be most at risk, new research indicates. An analysis of all U.S. military suicides between 2005 and 2011 revealed that the suicide rate among Army members was roughly double that seen among the second highest risk group, the Marines. The investigation further revealed that guns are the principal cause of most military suicides. Firearms were implicated in more than 62 percent of all suicide cases that have a definitive cause of death, the study found. "The trends in suicide are similar to what others have found," said study lead author Andrew Anglemyer, from California State University, Monterey Bay. "The differences in those rates between services are striking, though. Not only are most suicides in the active duty military among the Army ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Dysthymia, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Neurotic Depression, Depressive Psychosis

Scans Spot Brain Region That Misfires in Depressed People

Posted 31 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 31, 2016 – A part of the brain that responds to bad experiences acts in an unexpected way in people with depression, a small study finds. One theory suggested that the pea-sized structure called the habenula was overactive in people with depression, so researchers decided to test that hypothesis. The investigators scanned the brains of 25 people with depression and 25 people who never had depression while they were shown images associated with receiving or not receiving a shock. "Surprisingly, we saw the exact opposite of what we predicted," said study senior author Jonathan Roiser. "In people with depression, habenula activity actually decreased when they thought they would get a shock. This shows that in depressed people the habenula reacts in a fundamentally different way," he explained. "Although we still don't know how or why this happens, it's clear that the theory ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Postpartum Depression, Dysthymia, Neurotic Depression, Diagnosis and Investigation, Depressive Psychosis, Head Imaging

Family Rejection Triples Risk for Suicide Attempts by Transgender People: Study

Posted 20 May 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 19, 2016 – Transgender people can face big difficulties, but a new study shows their journey is made much harder when family members reject them. The researchers found that risks for attempting suicide more than tripled for transgender adults who experienced a "high level" of familial rejection. The risk for alcohol or drug abuse also rose much higher in these situations, the research found. Why is the potential rejection of parents, spouses and children so devastating? As researchers from the City University of New York explained, when transgender individuals face societal stigma, families can provide crucial support. However, when their families shut them out, this may deprive transgender people of a much-needed emotional "buffer" against that discrimination, wrote co-authors Augustus Klein and Sarit Golub. One expert agreed that the support of loved ones is key. "This ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Dysthymia, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Neurotic Depression, Gender Dysphoria, Depressive Psychosis

States With More Gun Owners Have More Gun-Related Suicides: Study

Posted 20 May 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 19, 2016 – In states where there are more gun owners, there are also more gun-related suicides, a new U.S. study finds. Looking at 33 years' worth of data, the researchers found that states with more gun owners generally had more suicides by firearm among both men and women. Men in those states also had higher overall suicide rates. The findings do not prove that guns lead to more suicides, said lead researcher Dr. Michael Siegel, a professor at the Boston University School of Public Health. However, his team considered many other factors that could affect a state's suicide patterns – including unemployment levels, divorce rates, crime and residents' typical alcohol intake. And still, suicide rates rose in tandem with gun ownership, Siegel noted. For every 10-percentage-point increase in a state's gun ownership level, the rate of gun-related suicides among men rose by 3 ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Postpartum Depression, Dysthymia, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Neurotic Depression

Scientists Test 'Magic Mushroom' Chemical for Tough-to-Treat Depression

Posted 17 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 17, 2016 – A hallucinogenic compound found in "magic mushrooms" shows promise in treating depression, a small, preliminary study found. "Depression continues to affect a large proportion of the population, many of whom do not respond to conventional treatments," said Dr. Scott Krakower, a psychiatrist who reviewed the study. "Although this was a small study, it does offer hope for new, unconventional treatments, to help those who are battling with severe depression," said Krakower, who is chief of psychiatry at Zucker Hillside Hospital in Glen Oaks, N.Y. The new trial included 12 people with moderate to severe depression who had been resistant to standard treatment. All of the patients were given the compound psilocybin, found in hallucinogenic mushrooms. Three months after treatment, seven patients had reduced symptoms of depression, according to a team led by Dr. Robin ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Postpartum Depression, Dysthymia, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Neurotic Depression, Depressive Psychosis

Could Inducing Brief, Mild 'Fever' Help Ease Depression?

Posted 16 May 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 16, 2016 – Temporarily raising the body temperature of people who are depressed seems to ease symptoms for up to six weeks, a small new study finds. The treatment, known as whole-body hyperthermia, essentially gives patients a mild, transient fever, the researchers explained. Similar to some antidepressant drugs, the treatment is thought to work by activating a part of the brain that produces the chemical serotonin. This brain region is less active in people with depression, the researchers explained. "Our hope is to find better and faster-acting treatments for depression than the antidepressants currently in use," said lead researcher Dr. Charles Raison of the University of Wisconsin. "We think that using heat to stimulate the skin activates serotonin-producing cells in the mid-brain, which then produce a change in how the brain functions," he explained in a university ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Wellbutrin, Effexor, Prozac, Celexa, Citalopram, Paxil, Major Depressive Disorder, Trazodone, Sertraline, Fever, Pristiq, Amitriptyline, Bupropion, Viibryd, Fluoxetine, Venlafaxine

Depressive Episode May Not Always Follow Mania in Bipolar Disorder

Posted 10 May 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 9, 2016 – While many may associate bipolar disorder with episodes of mania followed by periods of depression, a new study suggests that's often not the case. Researchers say states of anxiety are equally as likely as to follow manic episodes as depression. The finding might have implications for better treatment, the research team said. "For years, we may have missed opportunities to evaluate the effects of treatments for bipolar disorder on anxiety," said study lead author Dr. Mark Olfson, a professor of psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City. "The results of our study suggest that researchers should begin to ask whether, and to what extent, treatments for bipolar disorder relieve anxiety as well as mania and depression," he added in a university new release. According to the study authors, about 5.7 million Americans have bipolar disorder, which ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Bipolar Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, Mania, Postpartum Depression, Dysthymia, Neurotic Depression, Depressive Psychosis

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