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Neurosurgery News

Removing Part of Skull After Severe Head Injury Brings Mixed Results

Posted 8 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 8, 2016 – Removing part of the skull to relieve pressure in the brain following a severe head injury can save a person's life, but the patient is often left permanently disabled, a new clinical trial has determined. Doctors frequently turn to craniectomy for patients who are suffering from brain swelling as a result of traumatic head injury, but little is known about whether the procedure spares these patients from long-term brain damage. The new trial found it can drastically reduce risk of death, with about 30 percent of patients dying following the procedure compared to 52 percent of those treated with standard medical care. However, people treated with a craniectomy were three times more likely to wind up in a vegetative state (6 percent vs. 2 percent), and often were as likely to suffer long-term disabilities as patients receiving standard medical care, the study ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Head Injury, Head & Neck Surgery, Neurosurgery, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Seizure Prophylaxis During or Following Neurosurgery, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Surgical Safety Checklists May Shorten Hospital Stays, Save Lives

Posted 3 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 3, 2016 – A surgical safety checklist reduced patients' risk of death over 90 days and shortened their hospital stay, a new study found. The findings suggest that surgical safety checklists can reduce health care costs by reducing the risk of complications or additional surgery to correct problems, said Dr. Matthias Bock, of Bolzano Central Hospital in Italy, and colleagues. The researchers examined outcomes for more than 10,700 surgery patient in the six months before and after a 17-to-24-item surgical safety checklist was introduced at a hospital in Italy. The study did not include heart surgery patients. The death rate within 90 days of surgery was 2.4 percent before and 2.2 percent after the checklist was introduced. The 30-day death rate fell from 1.4 percent to 1.3 percent. Average length of hospital stay was 10.4 days before and 9.6 days after the checklist was ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Neurosurgery, Surgical Prophylaxis, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vascular Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Removing All Visible Cancer Is Key to Treating Aggressive Brain Tumors

Posted 14 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 14, 2015 – Surgery that removes all visible cancer significantly improves the chances of survival for children with aggressive brain tumors, especially girls. That's the finding of a study that included almost 100 children treated for high-grade glioma brain cancer between 1988 and 2010. These rare brain tumors occur in fewer than one in 100,000 children and teens. After two years, the overall survival rate was 45 percent; 25 percent had no cancer progression. Surgery to remove all visible signs of cancer was successful in one-third of the children. Their median survival was 3.4 years, compared with 1.6 years for those who did not have all visible cancer removed. Median means half of the children lived longer, half did not. The survival benefit after successful surgery was much greater in girls, with median survival of 8.1 years. Boys had a median survival of 2.4 years. ... Read more

Related support groups: Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Neurosurgery, Malignant Glioma

When New Doctors 'Train' During Surgery, Risks Don't Rise: Study

Posted 6 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 6, 2015 – People undergoing brain or spine surgery are at no greater risk if doctors-in-training – called residents – assist during the operation, a new study suggests. Researchers found that residents are supervised and their assistance doesn't increase the risk for complications or death. "Patients often ask whether a resident is going to be involved in their case, and they're usually not looking to have more residents involved," Dr. Mohamad Bydon, a resident in neurosurgery at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, said in a hospital news release. "Some people have a fear of being treated in a hospital that trains doctors." To see if there was any basis for the concern, the researchers looked at results of more than 16,000 brain and spine surgeries performed between 2006 and 2012. The information was from the database of the American College of Surgeons National ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Head & Neck Surgery, Neurosurgery, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital

Surgery May Help Teens With Frequent Migraines, Study Contends

Posted 25 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 25, 2015 – Migraine surgery may be an effective choice for teens who haven't gotten relief from standard treatment, a small study suggests. In the study, researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland reviewed the medical records of 14 patients, with an average age of 16. In teens with migraine who haven't responded well to other treatments, "migraine surgery may offer symptomatic improvement of migraine headache frequency, duration and severity in patients with identifiable anatomical trigger sites," wrote the study's authors. However, at least one headache expert questioned the value of the procedure, citing a possible placebo effect. Results of the study were published in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Migraines are recurring bouts of moderate to severe head pain, according to the U.S. National Institutes of ... Read more

Related support groups: Migraine, Topamax, Migraine Prevention, Topiramate, Qsymia, Migraine Prophylaxis, Imitrex, Sumatriptan, Treximet, Neurosurgery, Topamax Sprinkle, Imitrex Statdose, Imitrex Statdose Refill, Sumavel DosePro, Phentermine/topiramate, Alsuma, Zecuity, Topiragen, Imitrex Nasal, Naproxen/Sumatriptan

Using Same Hospital for Complications After Surgery Lowers Death Risk: Study

Posted 18 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 18, 2015 – Surgery patients who suffer complications after discharge from a hospital are more likely to die if they're readmitted to a different hospital than where they had their original operation, a new study finds. University of Utah researchers reviewed information on millions of Medicare patients who underwent one of 12 major surgical procedures between 2001 and 2011. They found that up to one-fifth of the patients were readmitted to a hospital within 30 days due to complications. Up to 83 percent of patients with complications were readmitted to the same hospital where they had their initial surgery. Overall, readmission to the same hospital was associated with a 26 percent lower risk of death within 90 days, the study revealed. For specific types of surgeries, the risk of death associated with readmission to the same hospital ranged from 44 percent lower for ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Head & Neck Surgery, Neurosurgery, Appendectomy, Ophthalmic Surgery, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Spleen Removal, Vascular Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Genitourinary Surgical and Other Conditions

'Wiser' Surgeries for Those With Terminal Cancers

Posted 11 May 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 11, 2015 – While surgery rates for patients with late-stage, terminal cancers have stayed about the same in recent years, complications and deaths for these patients have fallen because surgeons are more selective about who has surgery, a new study finds. "Surgeons are becoming wiser," study author Dr. Sarah Bateni, a surgery resident at the University of California, Davis, said in a university news release. "Our research suggests that surgeons may be operating on healthier patients who are more likely to recover well from an operation," she said. "These are patients who can perform activities of daily living without assistance, for example." As Bateni explained, there are a number of reasons why surgeons might operate on late-stage cancer patients. "Some of it has to do with the patients and families," she said. "If the patient is uncomfortable, the family wants a ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Head & Neck Surgery, Neurosurgery, Surgical Prophylaxis, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Solid Tumors, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Biliary Tract Surgery

Stents Meant to Prevent Stroke May Actually Boost Risk

Posted 24 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 – Using stents rather than medication alone to keep narrowed arteries open in the brain may actually increase patients' risk of stroke, according to the results of a new trial. The study involved more than 100 patients at risk of stroke because of what's called intracranial arterial stenosis – plaque build-up in the artery walls in the brain. Those who received balloon-expandable stents – tiny, mesh tubes like those used to open heart arteries – were more than twice as likely to suffer a stroke or ministroke as patients treated with two blood thinners, Plavix and aspirin. Moreover, in the month after the procedure, 8.6 percent of the stent patients suffered from bleeding in the brain and about 5 percent died, versus none of those who were treated with drugs. "The current technology with balloon-mounted stent is very limited and is not recommended for patients ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Plavix, Excedrin, Clopidogrel, Aggrenox, Alka-Seltzer, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Ecotrin, Fiorinal with Codeine, Arthritis Pain Formula, Bayer Aspirin, Norgesic, Soma Compound, Aortic Stenosis, Excedrin Extra Strength, Neurosurgery, Norgesic Forte, Percodan, Anacin

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Related Condition Support Groups

Seizure Prophylaxis During or Following Neurosurgery, Surgery

Related Drug Support Groups

Dilantin, phenytoin, Phenytoin Sodium, Phenytek