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Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis News

Avoiding Alcohol Helps the Heart Beat Better

Posted 3 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 18, 2017 – The longer you refrain from drinking, the lower your risk of a common heart rhythm disorder. That's the message of a new long-range study examining alcohol use and atrial fibrillation, or Afib. This is when electrical impulses in the upper chambers of the heart are chaotic and cause an irregular heartbeat, which increases the risk of blood clots that can cause stroke or heart attacks. One in four adults older than 40 is at risk for Afib, and nearly 6 million people in the United States could have the condition by 2050. But the researchers from the University of California, San Francisco found that every decade of non-drinking decreased the risk of Afib by 20 percent, regardless of the type of alcohol. The study included heart-risk data generated over 25 years on more than 15,000 American adults. Past drinkers were at increased risk for Afib, the researchers ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Alcohol Dependence, Transient Ischemic Attack, Alcoholism, Myocardial Infarction, Hangover, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Tai Chi: A Gentler Way to Exercise for Ailing Hearts

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 11, 2017 – People with heart disease who shy away from traditional cardiac rehabilitation may benefit from tai chi. A small study found that the slow, gentle movements of this traditional Chinese practice may help increase physical activity among those who are reluctant to exercise. More than 60 percent of heart attack survivors opt out of cardiac rehabilitation, often because of the perception that the exercise involved will be unpleasant or painful, according to the study authors. "We thought that tai chi might be a good option for these people because you can start very slowly and simply and, as their confidence increases, the pace and movements can be modified to increase intensity," said study author Dr. Elena Salmoirago-Blotcher. She is an assistant professor of medicine at the Warren Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University. "Tai chi exercise can reach ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Surviving Heart Attack Often Means Leaving Job Behind

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 4, 2017 – Recovering from a heart attack can be a long, painful process, and now a new study finds that almost one-quarter of those patients who returned to work ultimately left their jobs over the following year. The findings suggest that "even though patients return to work after a heart attack, they may still require individual adjustments at their workplaces in order to stay employed," said study author Dr. Laerke Smedegaard Petersen. She is a graduate student at Copenhagen University Hospital in Denmark. An estimated 676,000 people in the United States survive heart attacks each year, according to the American Heart Association. Many survivors are of working age: The average age of heart attack is 65 for men and 72 for women, the association says. The new study examined the medical and work records of over 22,000 patients in Denmark who were employed before ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Stopping Aspirin Tied to Quick Rise in Heart Attack, Stroke Risk

Posted 26 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 25, 2017 – People who stop following their doctor's advice to take a daily aspirin may see their risk of heart attack and stroke quickly rise, a new study suggests. Low-dose aspirin is a standard therapy for people at increased risk of a heart attack or stroke. But many eventually stop taking it, or at least consider quitting, said Dr. Johan Sundstrom, the lead researcher on the new study. Sometimes it's because of side effects, such as upset stomach, according to Sundstrom, a professor at Uppsala University, in Sweden. Other times, he said, it's simple "forgetfulness." His team wanted to find out what happened when patients quit their low-dose aspirin. The investigators looked at medical records from more than 600,000 Swedish adults who'd been prescribed aspirin to prevent cardiovascular trouble. (In Sweden, it's given by prescription, not over-the-counter, as in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Excedrin, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Alka-Seltzer, Aggrenox, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Arthritis Pain, Ecotrin, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Fiorinal with Codeine, Norgesic, Arthritis Pain Formula, Bayer Aspirin, Soma Compound, Excedrin Extra Strength, Norgesic Forte

Wrongly Focusing On The Airway Can Cost Athletes' Lives in Cardiac Arrest

Posted 19 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 19, 2017 – Athletes are dying from cardiac arrests that occur during play because teammates, coaches and other bystanders don't know how to best save their lives, a new study claims. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) applied immediately can give these athletes a fighting chance, but onlookers failed to provide CPR in three out of five cases, according to a review of more than two dozen game videos. Bystanders instead most often tried to keep the athlete from swallowing his or her tongue, acting on the widespread misconception that this must be done to prevent a person in cardiac arrest from asphyxiating, said lead researcher Dana Viskin. She is with the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center and Sackler School of Medicine at Tel Aviv University in Israel. "Athletes, especially professional athletes, are receiving poor CPR because the first responders – that is, their fellow ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Myocardial Infarction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiac Arrest, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Cardiogenic Shock, Asystole, Post MI Syndrome

Calcium in Arteries May Best Predict Risk of Heart Attack, Stroke

Posted 1 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 31, 2017 – People with no calcium buildup in their arteries seem to have a significantly lower risk of heart attack and stroke, a new study finds. Calcium collects in the arteries after plaque builds up and hardens over time, the study authors explained. For the study, researchers looked at nearly 6,200 people, aged 45 to 84, and found that those whose arteries were free of calcium deposits had a less than 3 percent chance of heart attack or stroke over the next decade. That's well below the 7.5 percent heart risk level used as a guideline to begin treatment with cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, the researchers noted. The study finding held true even among people who had other risk factors, such as diabetes, high blood pressure or high levels of bad cholesterol. About half of the study participants showed no calcium deposits in their arteries. "The event rates when ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Insulin Resistance, Zocor, Lovastatin, Pre-Diabetes, Myocardial Infarction, Rosuvastatin, Pravachol, Diabetes Mellitus, Livalo, Red Yeast Rice

Bystander CPR Less Likely in Black Neighborhoods

Posted 30 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30, 2017 – If your heart suddenly stops beating, the racial makeup of the neighborhood may determine the likelihood of receiving CPR from a passer-by or having access to a public defibrillator, researchers say. These lifesaving treatments for cardiac arrest occur less often in black neighborhoods in the United States, researchers discovered. Delaying CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) can dramatically reduce the odds of surviving cardiac arrest. "We have known that there are differences in the rates of survival from cardiac arrest between blacks and whites, but it was surprising to see how the demographics of a neighborhood affected outcomes of residents who experience cardiac arrest," said Dr. Monique Starks, the study's lead author. She's a cardiologist at the Duke Clinical Research Institute in Durham, N.C. "This is absolutely a call to action to improve and expand ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Angina, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiac Arrest, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Oxygen Therapy Doesn't Boost Heart Attack Survival

Posted 30 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30, 2017 – Oxygen therapy is a routine treatment for people suspected of having a heart attack, but a new study suggests there may be no benefit for these patients. That was true even for patients who were older, smoked or had diabetes or heart disease, according to the Swedish researchers. The "study questions the current practice of routine oxygen therapy for all patients with suspected [heart attack]," said lead author Dr. Robin Hofmann, a cardiologist from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. Patients who may have had a heart attack and are having trouble breathing, not getting adequate oxygen or have heart failure are often treated with oxygen therapy, in which oxygen is delivered through a mask or tubes in the nose, the researchers explained. "ESC [European Society of Cardiology] guidelines have gradually shifted towards more restrictive use of oxygen," said ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Oxygen, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Sleepless Nights Do No Favors for Your Heart

Posted 30 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30, 2017 – Poor sleep won't simply leave you bleary-eyed. It's also linked with stroke and reduced blood supply to the heart, a new study suggests. "Poor sleep" includes too short or too long sleep, difficulty falling asleep and difficulty maintaining sleep, said lead researcher Dr. Nobuo Sasaki. "Poor sleep is associated with cardiovascular diseases ... but the kind of sleep disturbances that are most risky is not well documented," said Sasaki, of the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Casualty Council in Japan. The researchers set out to investigate sleep problems linked to heart attack and angina (coronary artery disease), and stroke. Coronary artery disease is caused by narrowed heart arteries. This means less blood and oxygen reach the heart, raising the risk for heart attack and chest pain known as angina, according to the American Heart Association. The observational study ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Lisinopril, Fatigue, Amlodipine, Losartan, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Benicar, Diovan, Diltiazem, Norvasc, Verapamil, Ramipril, Nifedipine, Cozaar, Valsartan, Enalapril, Micardis, Cardizem

As Temperatures Fall, Heart Attacks May Rise

Posted 30 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 29, 2017 – If the cold weather makes you shiver, your blood vessels and heart may be quivering, too – and that may be enough to trigger a heart attack in some people, new research suggests. The study found that more heart attacks occur when temperatures drop below freezing, suggesting people with plaques in their coronary arteries may not cope well with the body's response to cold. "There is seasonal variation in the occurrence of heart attack, with incidence declining in summer and peaking in winter," said study first author Moman Mohammad, a doctoral student from Lund University in Sweden. "It is unclear whether this is due to colder temperatures or behavioral changes," Mohammad said. The body responds to cold by narrowing superficial blood vessels, reducing heat conduction in the skin and raising blood pressure, the researchers explained. The body also shivers and ... Read more

Related support groups: Influenza, Heart Attack, Cold Symptoms, Pseudoephedrine, Minoxidil, Phenylephrine, Nitroglycerin, Imdur, Myocardial Infarction, Ranexa, Isosorbide Mononitrate, Hydralazine, Muse, Ephedrine, Alprostadil, Edex, Caverject, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Nitrostat, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Marriage a Blessing for Heart Attack Patients

Posted 29 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 29, 2017 – Marriage is good medicine for someone who has a heart attack. That's the conclusion of a study that tracked nearly 1 million British patients for 13 years. The researchers found that married patients who had a heart attack were 14 percent more likely to survive until the end of the study than singles. And compared to divorced patients, survival odds for wedded folks were 16 percent higher, said study senior author Dr. Rahul Potluri. He's a clinical lecturer at Aston University Medical School in Birmingham, England. "Marriage is a proxy for psychological risk factors which are important for ensuring compliance to medication," Potluri said. In other words, the social and physical support a spouse can provide translates to significant health benefits. For instance, marriage appears to have a positive effect on the three largest risk factors for heart disease – ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Hypertensive Heart Disease

New Drug, Canakinumab, May Fight Heart Disease in Whole New Way

Posted 28 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 28, 2017 – Move over, statins: New research finds that a medication aimed at dampening the body's inflammatory response may be a new tool to curb heart disease. The findings were presented Sunday at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress in Barcelona, Spain, and published in two major medical journals, The Lancet and the New England Journal of Medicine. The trial focused on a new drug called canakinumab, which lowered by 15 percent the overall rate of heart events such as heart attack, stroke and cardiovascular death in people who'd already had a heart attack. The people in the study also had high levels of a compound called C-reactive protein in their blood – a marker that is indicative of a heightened inflammatory response. For years, heart researchers have wondered if a drug that lowered inflammation might help curb heart disease. Cardiologists had mixed ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Zocor, Lovastatin, Myocardial Infarction, Rosuvastatin, Hypertriglyceridemia, Pravachol, Livalo, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Red Yeast Rice, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Lescol

After Heart Attack, Just 1 in 3 Go for Rehab: CDC

Posted 24 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 24, 2017 – Only one in three heart attack survivors in the United States goes for outpatient cardiac rehabilitation, government health officials report. Despite guidelines that recommend rehab for reducing the risk of future heart attacks, it's greatly underused, according to statistics released Thursday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Each year, about 790,000 U.S. adults have heart attacks, of which 210,000 are repeat heart attacks, the CDC report said. Exercise counseling, healthy heart lifestyle advice and stress-reduction tips – which are part of cardiac rehab – help reduce those odds of recurrence. There's another advantage as well: extended medical supervision after discharge, the researchers said. The report was led by Dr. Jing Fang, of the CDC's division for heart disease and stroke prevention. Fang's team analyzed health survey data ... Read more

Related support groups: Lisinopril, Metoprolol, Heart Disease, Atenolol, Losartan, Heart Attack, Benicar, Diovan, Bystolic, Angina, Ramipril, Bisoprolol, Cozaar, Valsartan, Enalapril, Micardis, Benazepril, Avapro, Toprol-XL, Atacand

More Support for Tight Blood Pressure Control

Posted 23 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23, 2017 – For people at increased risk of heart disease, intensive blood pressure control may be just as safe as standard treatment, a new study finds. Experts said the results bolster the case for more aggressive treatment of high blood pressure. Two years ago, a U.S. government-funded trial called SPRINT challenged the standard approach to treating high blood pressure. Intensive control meant using medication to get patients' systolic pressure – the top number – below 120 mm Hg. That was a big change from standard treatment, where the aim is to get below 140 mm Hg, or in some cases 150. Driving down blood pressure to lower levels had major benefits for people at increased risk of heart attack. That included people age 75 and older, and patients with existing heart disease or multiple risk factors for it such as smoking and high cholesterol. Overall, the aggressive ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Metoprolol, Smoking, Heart Disease, Atenolol, Losartan, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Propranolol, Hydrochlorothiazide, Benicar, Diovan, Smoking Cessation, Bystolic, Carvedilol, Ramipril, Bisoprolol, Coreg

Heart Risks May Rise After Cancer Diagnosis

Posted 15 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 15, 2017 – As if people newly diagnosed with cancer don't have enough to worry about, a new study suggests the diagnosis may put their hearts at risk, too. The study found that newly diagnosed cancer patients are at increased risk for a condition called arterial thromboembolism, which occurs when blood flow is blocked by a clot that's traveled from another part of the body, such as the legs. The potential heart threat is higher "especially during the first six months after diagnosis," said a team led by Dr. Babak Navi, of Weill Cornell Medicine's department of neurology in New York City. Looking through a 2002-2011 database of about 140,000 cancer patients and an equal number of people without cancer, Navi's team found that cancer patients had twice the risk of an arterial thromboembolism in the six months after cancer diagnosis than patients without cancer. The study ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Ischemic Stroke, Breast Cancer, Heart Attack, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Lung Cancer, Transient Ischemic Attack, Colorectal Cancer, Zocor, Lovastatin, Myocardial Infarction, Rosuvastatin, Pravachol, Livalo, Red Yeast Rice, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis

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