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Calcium Supplements Tied to Kidney Stone Risk in Study

Posted 13 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 13, 2015 – People with a history of kidney stones may have a higher risk of recurrence if they use calcium supplements, a new study finds. The findings, based on records from more than 2,000 patients, add to evidence linking calcium supplements to kidney stone risk. But researchers also said that people taking calcium under a doctor's advice should not stop on their own. "We're definitely not advocating that people stop taking calcium supplements if their doctor prescribed them for their bone health," said Christopher Loftus, the lead researcher on the study and an M.D. candidate at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine. Loftus is scheduled to present his findings next month at the American Society of Nephrology's annual meeting in San Diego. Data and conclusions presented at meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical ... Read more

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Added Calcium May Not Help Older Bones: Studies

Posted 29 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 29, 2015 – Extra calcium may not protect your aging bones after all. New Zealand researchers who analyzed more than 100 previous investigations say guidelines advising seniors to consume at least 1,000 to 1,200 milligrams of calcium a day are misplaced. No proof was found that boosting calcium intake beyond normal dietary levels strengthens older bones or prevents fractures, said researcher Dr. Mark Bolland. "We've gathered all the clinical studies of calcium supplements and dietary calcium intake for both bone density and fractures," said Bolland, an associate professor in the department of medicine at the University of Auckland. "Taken together, we think this is the strongest possible evidence that taking calcium supplements will not be beneficial unless there are clear medical reasons that a calcium supplement is needed," he said. Moreover, excess calcium ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoporosis, Tums, Fracture, bone, Caltrate, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Calcium Carbonate, Pepcid Complete, Arthritis Pain Formula, Rolaids, Titralac, Oyster, Oyster Shell, Titralac Plus, Os-Cal 500, Os-Cal, Slow-Mag, Mag 64, Oysco 500, Florical, Oyster Calcium

U.S. Kids Not Drinking Enough Water Each Day

Posted 11 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 11, 2015 – Many American children and teens aren't consuming enough liquids – especially water – and that lack of hydration could affect their physical and mental health, a new study suggests. The findings "highlight a potential health issue that has not been given a whole lot of attention in the past," study author Erica Kenney, a postdoctoral research fellow in social and behavioral sciences at the Harvard School of Public Health, said in a Harvard news release. "Even though for most of these kids this is not an immediate, dramatic health threat, this is an issue that could really be reducing quality of life and well-being for many, many children and youth," she added. One expert in child health agreed. "Children – due to their slower acclimation to heat and greater surface area than adults – can be more susceptible to dehydration than adults," said Nancy ... Read more

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Health Tip: Avoiding Leg Cramps

Posted 20 May 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Painful leg cramps can happen to anyone, but tend to be common among seniors. The AARP recommends: Gently stretch and flex the leg to ease a cramp. Ask your doctor if a medication, such as a statin or diuretic, could be causing your leg cramps. Make sure your electrolyte levels are normal. Below-normal levels of potassium, magnesium or calcium could trigger leg cramps. Drink plenty of fluids. Make sure the covers aren't too tight on your bed. Choose shoes with proper arch support. Read more

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U.S. Lowers Recommended Fluoride Levels in Drinking Water

Posted 27 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 27, 2015 – The U.S. government has decreased its recommended level of fluoride in drinking water for the first time in a half-century, to prevent staining of tooth enamel caused by overexposure to fluoride. The optimal fluoride level in drinking water to prevent tooth decay should be 0.7 milligrams of fluoride per liter of water, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced Monday. The new level falls at the bottom end of the previously recommended fluoridation range of 0.7 to 1.2 milligrams per liter, which was issued in 1962. Health experts recommended the change because Americans now have access to more sources of fluoride, including toothpaste and mouth rinses, than they did when municipal officials first began adding the mineral to water supplies across the United States, according to the HHS. As a result, more people are exposed to too much ... Read more

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Calcium May Cut Risk for Precancerous Colon Lesions in Some People

Posted 10 Apr 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 10 – Consuming higher amounts of calcium may lower the likelihood of precancerous colon and rectal lesions in people who are at increased risk due to variations in two genes, a new study suggests. High calcium intake did not affect risk in people without the genetic variations. The findings may help explain inconsistent results in previous research about the link between calcium intake and the risk for these lesions, called colorectal adenomas, the researchers said. They also said the findings may help identify patients who would benefit from calcium supplements or higher levels of calcium in their diet. The study of nearly 6,000 people in Tennessee found that patients with the highest calcium intake had no reduced risk for colorectal adenomas if they had no variations in two genes – KCNJ1 and SLC12A1 – that are essential in calcium reabsorption in the kidneys. ... Read more

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Healthy Older Women Advised Against Taking Calcium

Posted 25 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 25 – Healthy older women should not take calcium and vitamin D supplements to prevent fractures, according to a final recommendation issued Monday by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. In healthy adults, lower doses of calcium and vitamin D seem to be ineffective. As for higher doses, it's still up in the air, the government group said. The new recommendations do not apply to people who are known to be vitamin D-deficient or who already have osteoporosis, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) noted. Every year about 1.5 million fractures in the United States are attributed to osteoporosis, which is caused by a decrease in bone mass and density that makes bones fragile and more susceptible to a break. Almost half of all women older than 50 will have an osteoporosis-related fracture in their lifetime, according to the USPSTF. Calcium is one of the main ... Read more

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Calcium Supplements May Raise Odds of Heart Death in Women

Posted 12 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 12 – Women eating a high-calcium diet and taking calcium supplements adding up to more than 1,400 milligrams a day may be running nearly twice the risk of dying from heart disease, a large Swedish study suggests. Both men and women take calcium supplements to prevent bone loss. The new findings come on the heels of another recent study that found a similar increased risk of death related to calcium intake among men. "Many older adults increase dietary intake of calcium or take calcium supplements to prevent bone loss and there had been speculation that increased calcium intake with or without vitamin D could improve cardiovascular health," said Dr. Gregg Fonarow, an American Heart Association spokesman who wasn't involved in the study. However, a number of recent studies have suggested that higher dietary intake or calcium supplementation may not only not improve ... Read more

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Calcium, Vitamin D Supplements May Pose Risks for Men With Prostate Cancer

Posted 9 Aug 2012 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 9 – Although they're standard treatment for men with prostate cancer who are taking hormonal therapy, calcium and vitamin D supplements may do more harm than good, according to a new study. Men who undergo hormone-depletion therapy for prostate cancer are at risk for osteoporosis, but the supplements do not prevent this bone loss and may actually boost patients' odds for heart disease and aggressive prostate cancer, research from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center suggests. "Calcium and/or vitamin D supplementation to prevent loss of bone mineral density in these men seems so logical that no one had questioned whether it works," study co-author, Mridul Datta, a postdoctoral fellow at Wake Forest Baptist, explained in a hospital news release. "It wouldn't be so bad if there simply was no obvious benefit," added the study's lead author, Gary Schwartz, a prostate cancer ... Read more

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