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Minor Skin Irritation News

Related terms: Skin Irritation, minor

Health Tip: Want Healthier Looking Skin?

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Your skin care routine may well impact how your skin ages. The American Academy of Dermatology offers this advice: Wear sunscreen before you head outside. Don't smoke. Inspect your skin regularly for signs of skin cancer. Determine your skin type, such as oily or dry, and use products formulated for that type. Wash your face before bed, when you wake and after each time you sweat. Use mild warm water and a gentle cleanser, and don't scrub. Find ways to manage stress. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Sunburn, Facial Wrinkles, Prevention of Sunburn, Minor Skin Conditions, Minor Skin Irritation

How to Prevent Spread of the Skin Infection Impetigo

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Nov. 27, 2016 – Impetigo is a contagious skin infection that's preventable and can be treated with antibiotics, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. It's common among kids, but adults can get impetigo, too. The telltale signs are blisters or sores, usually on the face, neck, hands and diaper area. Impetigo can strike anytime but is more common during warm weather months. More than 3 million cases a year occur in the United States. It's caused by two types of bacteria that are usually harmless. They can trigger infection when someone suffers a minor cut, scrape or insect bite. "We typically see impetigo with kids 2 to 6 years old, probably because they get more cuts and scrapes and scratch more. And that spreads the bacteria," FDA pediatrician Dr. Thomas Smith said in an agency news release. Symptoms include itchy rash; itchy red sores that fill with fluid and then burst, ... Read more

Related support groups: Bacterial Skin Infection, Impetigo, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

Can Protein in Common Skin Bacteria Offer Disease Protection?

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23, 2016 – Our most common skin bacteria may help shield us from some skin diseases, a new study suggests. Swedish researchers report that Propionibacterium acnes secretes a protein called RoxP that protects against bacteria that are believed to contribute to several skin disorders. Specifically, RoxP protects against skin cell damage called oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen bacteria. UV radiation from the sun is a common cause of oxidative stress on the skin. Oxidative stress is believed to contribute to several skin diseases, including eczema, psoriasis and skin cancer. The protective effect of RoxP is as strong as antioxidants such as vitamins C and E, according to the study published recently in the journal Scientific Reports. "This protein is important for the bacterium's very survival on our skin. The bacterium improves its living environment by secreting ... Read more

Related support groups: Acne, Psoriasis, Eczema, Dermatitis, Rosacea, Contact Dermatitis, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Atopic Dermatitis, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

Health Tip: Dress Kids in Safe Costumes

Posted 28 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- It's a thrill for kids to don costumes that are sweet, silly or scary. But it's most important that children are kept safe. Here are recommendations from the U.S. National Safety Council: Choose costumes and accessories that are fire-resistant. Place reflective tape on costumes and trick-or-treat bags to help others see children after dark. Use nontoxic makeup. Test a small spot to make sure there's no skin reaction. When trick-or-treating is over, wash off all makeup to help avoid irritation of the eyes and skin. Read more

Related support groups: Prevention of Fractures, Minor Skin Irritation

Health Tip: Want Younger-Looking Skin?

Posted 12 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- The key to younger-looking skin may be choosing the right care products. The American Academy of Dermatology suggests: Use sunscreen and anti-aging moisturizer daily. Choose products that specifically address your concerns, such as dark spots or wrinkles. Make sure any products you buy are designed for your skin type, such as dry, oily or sensitive. Choose products that are hypoallergenic, won't clog your pores (non-comedogenic) and offer a consumer hotline for questions. Be realistic about what these products can do for your skin. Read more

Related support groups: Dry Skin, Facial Wrinkles, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

A Guide to Coping With Corns and Calluses

Posted 10 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 – Corns and calluses are sometimes painful areas of thickened skin that develop on the feet due to repeated rubbing or pressure. Those on the toe or top of the foot are called corns. Those that develop on the bottom of the foot are called calluses. No matter where they are, corns and calluses can hurt, and can lead to serious problems in people with diabetes or decreased circulation, according to the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA). "Mild corns and calluses may not require treatment. If the corn or callus isn't bothering you, it can probably be left alone," according to an association news release. "If corns or calluses are causing pain and discomfort or inhibiting your daily life in any way, see a podiatrist. Also, people with diabetes, poor circulation, or other serious illnesses should have their feet checked," the group advised. Your doctor may ... Read more

Related support groups: Foot Care, Minor Skin Conditions, Minor Skin Irritation

6 Keys to a Safe, Allergy-Free Halloween

Posted 10 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 – Halloween can be really scary for kids with asthma and allergies – and for their parents – unless they take precautions, an allergist advises. "Keep certain common sense tips in mind as you prepare for the holiday," said Bryan Martin, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). "A little preparation can ensure your little ones don't suffer from allergic reactions or asthma attacks," Martin said in an ACAAI news release. To help parents prepare, he offered these six tips: Masks can be scary. For kids with asthma, try to choose a costume that doesn't require a mask. If a child insists on one, it should not be tight-fitting or obstruct breathing. Halloween makeup sometimes causes allergic reactions. Use only high-quality, hypoallergenic makeup, and test it on a small patch of skin in advance to see if it triggers a reaction. Skip ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine, Xyzal

Health Tip: Why Is My Skin Dry?

Posted 4 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Finding that your skin is itchy, flaky and just plain dry? The American Academy of Dermatology explains the phenomenon: If you're over 40. Skin typically thins and gets dryer as you age. If you live in the desert or a similarly dry climate. If you have a skin condition, such as eczema or psoriasis. If you have a job that frequently exposes your hands to water, such as a hair stylist or nurse. If you spend lots of time swimming in a pool, which typically has high amounts of drying chlorine. Read more

Related support groups: Dry Skin, Minor Skin Conditions, Minor Skin Irritation

Acne's Silver Lining: Slower Aging of the Skin?

Posted 29 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 29, 2016 – There's some potentially good news for people with a history of acne – their skin may age more slowly than those who didn't have to suffer mottled skin through adolescence. That's the suggestion of a British study that included just over 1,200 twins. One-quarter of them struggled with acne at some point in their life. "For many years, dermatologists have identified that the skin of acne sufferers appears to age more slowly than in those who have not experienced any acne in their lifetime. Whilst this has been observed in clinical settings, the cause of this was previously unclear," said lead researcher Dr. Simone Ribero. He is a dermatologist in the department of twin research and genetic epidemiology at King's College London. "Our findings suggest that the cause could be linked to the length of telomeres, which appears to be different in acne sufferers and ... Read more

Related support groups: Acne, Rosacea, Retin-A, Epiduo, Benzoyl Peroxide, Acne Treatment, Adapalene, Salicylic Acid, Finacea, Differin, Aczone, Compound W, Duac, Benzaclin, Duofilm, Atralin, Ziana, Adapalene/Benzoyl Peroxide, Benzoyl Peroxide/Clindamycin, Retin A Micro Gel

Health Tip: Soothe Baby's Cradle Cap

Posted 26 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Scaly red patches of skin on baby's scalp are commonly called cradle cap. It's a form of seborrheic dermatitis, otherwise known as recurring or chronic eczema. The American Academy of Family Physicians suggests how to manage cradle cap: Wash the scalp with a non-medicated, gentle shampoo for babies. Ask the pediatrician for a suggested brand. Apply petroleum jelly, mineral oil or olive oil to the scalp to help scales loosen. Use a soft toothbrush to help loosen scales. Be gentle to avoid breaking the skin, which could lead to infection. Read more

Related support groups: Seborrheic Dermatitis, Dandruff, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

Don't Let Painful Blisters Spoil Your Summer Fun

Posted 18 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, July 16, 2016 – You might think of blisters as painful nuisances on your feet, but one expert warns that blisters can appear anywhere that skin rubs against clothing or another part of the body. The good news: You can keep blisters at bay by preventing chafing. "Prevention is really the key when it comes to blisters," said Dr. Anthony Rossi, an assistant professor of dermatology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. "To stop them before they appear, pay attention to your skin and take precautions if you know you're going to do a lot of walking, running or other physical activity," he said in a news release from the American Academy of Dermatology. Rossi offers these tips: Wear socks. Try nylon and moisture-wicking socks, and throw on an extra pair of socks if one doesn't do the trick. Avoid shoes that are too tight or too loose. When you're active, wear ... Read more

Related support groups: Foot Care, Minor Skin Conditions, Minor Skin Irritation

FDA OKs Non-Prescription Use of Acne Drug

Posted 8 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 8, 2016 – Good news for acne sufferers: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved an over-the-counter retinoid drug for acne – the first new active ingredient available without a prescription since the 1980s. The drug – Differin Gel 0.1% (adapalene) – has been in use in a stronger form as a prescription acne treatment since 1996, the FDA said Friday. It is applied to the skin once a day and approved for people 12 and older. "Millions of consumers, from adolescents to adults, suffer from acne," Dr. Lesley Furlong, of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in an agency news release. "Now, consumers have access to a new safe and effective over-the-counter option." As many as 50 million people in the United States have acne, the majority of them teenagers and young adults. The telltale pimples form when hair follicles of the skin clog up, marring ... Read more

Related support groups: Acne, Epiduo, Adapalene, Differin, Adapalene/Benzoyl Peroxide, Epiduo Forte, Minor Skin Conditions, Clindap-T, Minor Skin Irritation, Adapalene/clindamycin

Beware Broken Glow Sticks

Posted 5 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 4, 2016 – Letting kids chew or cut glow sticks is a bad idea, health experts say. While safer than sparklers and fireworks, pliable glow-in-the-dark products are easily broken open when put in the mouth. The contents can irritate the skin, eyes and mouth, the experts warn. Some glow products contain a chemical called dibutyl phthalate (DBP). The liquid typically causes immediate stinging and a burning sensation in the mouth and eyes, according to the Nebraska Regional Poison Center in Omaha. Last year, the poison center received 321 calls about glow products. Here are some tips from the poison-control experts: If ingested, the bitter-tasting chemical will likely cause brief discomfort in the mouth. Thorough rinsing should help. If the liquid gets on the skin, wash it off immediately to prevent the child from rubbing the chemical in the eyes. If it gets in the eyes, it will ... Read more

Related support groups: Poisoning, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

Dermatologists: Daily Bath OK for Kids With Eczema

Posted 29 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 29, 2016 – Although some doctors advise against giving a daily bath to kids with the skin condition eczema, a new paper says a daily soak is fine as long as it's followed by plenty of moisturizer. Eczema occurs in adults and children, but is most common in babies. It results in extremely dry, itchy skin, and sometimes inflamed rashes. Some medical professionals believe infrequent bathing (less than once a day) helps prevent skin irritation. However, others contend that bathing at least once a day helps keep skin hydrated, as long as baths are followed by immediate use of a moisturizer to seal in moisture. This process was dubbed "soak and smear" in the paper written by Dr. Ivan Cardona, an allergy and immunology specialist from Portland, Maine, and colleagues. "A number of medical groups have commented on the general role of bathing in eczema. But they don't all agree ... Read more

Related support groups: Eczema, Dry Skin, Fleet, Biafine, Skin Care, Vaseline, Aquaphor, Ammonium Lactate, Aveeno, Lanolin, Complex-15, Hylatopic, CeraVe, Carmol, Concept, Cetaphil Cleanser, Eucerin, Replens, X-Viate, Lanolin Hydrous

Hair Removal for a Beach-Ready Body? Do It Safely

Posted 22 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 22, 2016 – If you're plagued by patches of unwanted hair, waxing is one way to achieve a fuzz-free look – at least for a little while. But, waxing needs to be done properly to prevent problems, a dermatologist says. "At-home waxing can be an affordable method for hair removal, but it's important to take precautions," Dr. Jessica Krant said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. She is assistant clinical professor of dermatology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center in New York City. "Never wax sunburned or very sensitive skin, and don't wax if you have taken [the acne medication] isotretinoin in the last six months. Also, it may be a good idea to leave Brazilian waxes to the professionals, since the skin in that area is particularly delicate," she advised. (A Brazilian wax removes most or all of a woman's pubic hair.) Before waxing, make sure your hair is about ... Read more

Related support groups: Accutane, Isotretinoin, Claravis, Amnesteem, Sotret, Zenatane, Absorica, Myorisan, Minor Skin Conditions, Minor Skin Irritation

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