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Minor Skin Conditions News

Health Tip: Want Healthier Looking Skin?

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Your skin care routine may well impact how your skin ages. The American Academy of Dermatology offers this advice: Wear sunscreen before you head outside. Don't smoke. Inspect your skin regularly for signs of skin cancer. Determine your skin type, such as oily or dry, and use products formulated for that type. Wash your face before bed, when you wake and after each time you sweat. Use mild warm water and a gentle cleanser, and don't scrub. Find ways to manage stress. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Sunburn, Facial Wrinkles, Prevention of Sunburn, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

How to Prevent Spread of the Skin Infection Impetigo

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Nov. 27, 2016 – Impetigo is a contagious skin infection that's preventable and can be treated with antibiotics, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. It's common among kids, but adults can get impetigo, too. The telltale signs are blisters or sores, usually on the face, neck, hands and diaper area. Impetigo can strike anytime but is more common during warm weather months. More than 3 million cases a year occur in the United States. It's caused by two types of bacteria that are usually harmless. They can trigger infection when someone suffers a minor cut, scrape or insect bite. "We typically see impetigo with kids 2 to 6 years old, probably because they get more cuts and scrapes and scratch more. And that spreads the bacteria," FDA pediatrician Dr. Thomas Smith said in an agency news release. Symptoms include itchy rash; itchy red sores that fill with fluid and then burst, ... Read more

Related support groups: Bacterial Skin Infection, Impetigo, Minor Skin Conditions, Minor Skin Irritation

Can Protein in Common Skin Bacteria Offer Disease Protection?

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23, 2016 – Our most common skin bacteria may help shield us from some skin diseases, a new study suggests. Swedish researchers report that Propionibacterium acnes secretes a protein called RoxP that protects against bacteria that are believed to contribute to several skin disorders. Specifically, RoxP protects against skin cell damage called oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen bacteria. UV radiation from the sun is a common cause of oxidative stress on the skin. Oxidative stress is believed to contribute to several skin diseases, including eczema, psoriasis and skin cancer. The protective effect of RoxP is as strong as antioxidants such as vitamins C and E, according to the study published recently in the journal Scientific Reports. "This protein is important for the bacterium's very survival on our skin. The bacterium improves its living environment by secreting ... Read more

Related support groups: Acne, Psoriasis, Eczema, Dermatitis, Rosacea, Contact Dermatitis, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Atopic Dermatitis, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer, Minor Skin Conditions, Minor Skin Irritation

Health Tip: Control a Bleeding Wound

Posted 9 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Rinsing a wound with cold water helps clean it, but it may not be enough to prevent infection. Bleeding is the body's natural way of cleansing a wound. Then again, too much bleeding isn't healthy either. Here's how to stop heavy bleeding, courtesy of the American Academy of Family Physicians: If available, use a sterile or clean piece of cloth, gauze or tissue. Hold the material over the wound, gently applying pressure. Have another piece of clean material on hand. If the bleeding soaks the first piece, apply another clean piece on top, but don't remove the first piece. Hold the clean material in place for another 20 minutes with firm pressure. Raise a bleeding leg or arm above the level of your heart. Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Scrapes, Coagulation Defects and Disorders, Wound Cleansing, Minor Cuts, Wound Debridement, Minor Skin Conditions

Skin Condition Often Misdiagnosed as Bacterial Problem

Posted 4 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 4, 2016 – Misdiagnosis of the bacterial skin condition cellulitis often leads to unnecessary antibiotic use and hospitalizations, a new study says. About one-third of people diagnosed with cellulitis don't actually have it, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston found. The researchers looked at a 30-month period, examining the medical records of 259 people hospitalized for lower extremity cellulitis in the hospital's emergency department. But, 79 of the patients didn't have cellulitis. Almost 85 percent didn't need hospitalization and 92 percent didn't need the antibiotics they received, the researchers said. Looking at how their findings might reflect the nation as a whole, the researchers estimated that the misdiagnosed skin condition leads to about 130,000 unnecessary hospitalizations. The problem may cause up to $515 million in unneeded medical ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Skin Rash, Skin Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Skin and Structure Infection, Secondary Cutaneous Bacterial Infections, Minor Skin Conditions

Scented Rooms, Products? Many Health-Conscious Americans Say 'No Thanks'

Posted 2 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2, 2016 – Lavender, lemon or lilac: Whatever the artificial aroma, more Americans are avoiding scented spaces and products, a new survey shows. Fragranced products such as soaps, candles and air fresheners cause more than one-third of U.S. adults to suffer ill health effects, including headaches, dizziness and breathing difficulties, researchers said. Surveying a nationally representative group of more than 1,100 Americans, the research team also found that more than 20 percent of people quickly leave a business place if they smell air fresheners or other scented products. Led by Anne Steinemann, a professor of civil engineering at the University of Melbourne in Australia, the research is believed to be the first to examine many aspects of exposure to fragranced products and their effects in the United States. "What I found was that half the reports of adverse health ... Read more

Related support groups: Headache, Migraine, Cough, Asthma, Sinusitis, Migraine Prevention, Asthma - Maintenance, Cold Symptoms, Cluster Headaches, Dyspnea, Migraine Prophylaxis, Asthma - Acute, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Rhinitis, New Daily Persistent Headache, Sinus Symptoms, Respiratory Tract Disease, Allergic Asthma, Minor Skin Conditions

Health Tip: Want Younger-Looking Skin?

Posted 12 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- The key to younger-looking skin may be choosing the right care products. The American Academy of Dermatology suggests: Use sunscreen and anti-aging moisturizer daily. Choose products that specifically address your concerns, such as dark spots or wrinkles. Make sure any products you buy are designed for your skin type, such as dry, oily or sensitive. Choose products that are hypoallergenic, won't clog your pores (non-comedogenic) and offer a consumer hotline for questions. Be realistic about what these products can do for your skin. Read more

Related support groups: Dry Skin, Facial Wrinkles, Minor Skin Conditions, Minor Skin Irritation

A Guide to Coping With Corns and Calluses

Posted 10 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 – Corns and calluses are sometimes painful areas of thickened skin that develop on the feet due to repeated rubbing or pressure. Those on the toe or top of the foot are called corns. Those that develop on the bottom of the foot are called calluses. No matter where they are, corns and calluses can hurt, and can lead to serious problems in people with diabetes or decreased circulation, according to the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA). "Mild corns and calluses may not require treatment. If the corn or callus isn't bothering you, it can probably be left alone," according to an association news release. "If corns or calluses are causing pain and discomfort or inhibiting your daily life in any way, see a podiatrist. Also, people with diabetes, poor circulation, or other serious illnesses should have their feet checked," the group advised. Your doctor may ... Read more

Related support groups: Foot Care, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

6 Keys to a Safe, Allergy-Free Halloween

Posted 10 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 – Halloween can be really scary for kids with asthma and allergies – and for their parents – unless they take precautions, an allergist advises. "Keep certain common sense tips in mind as you prepare for the holiday," said Bryan Martin, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). "A little preparation can ensure your little ones don't suffer from allergic reactions or asthma attacks," Martin said in an ACAAI news release. To help parents prepare, he offered these six tips: Masks can be scary. For kids with asthma, try to choose a costume that doesn't require a mask. If a child insists on one, it should not be tight-fitting or obstruct breathing. Halloween makeup sometimes causes allergic reactions. Use only high-quality, hypoallergenic makeup, and test it on a small patch of skin in advance to see if it triggers a reaction. Skip ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine, Periactin, Xyzal

Health Tip: Why Is My Skin Dry?

Posted 4 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Finding that your skin is itchy, flaky and just plain dry? The American Academy of Dermatology explains the phenomenon: If you're over 40. Skin typically thins and gets dryer as you age. If you live in the desert or a similarly dry climate. If you have a skin condition, such as eczema or psoriasis. If you have a job that frequently exposes your hands to water, such as a hair stylist or nurse. If you spend lots of time swimming in a pool, which typically has high amounts of drying chlorine. Read more

Related support groups: Dry Skin, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

Acne's Silver Lining: Slower Aging of the Skin?

Posted 29 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 29, 2016 – There's some potentially good news for people with a history of acne – their skin may age more slowly than those who didn't have to suffer mottled skin through adolescence. That's the suggestion of a British study that included just over 1,200 twins. One-quarter of them struggled with acne at some point in their life. "For many years, dermatologists have identified that the skin of acne sufferers appears to age more slowly than in those who have not experienced any acne in their lifetime. Whilst this has been observed in clinical settings, the cause of this was previously unclear," said lead researcher Dr. Simone Ribero. He is a dermatologist in the department of twin research and genetic epidemiology at King's College London. "Our findings suggest that the cause could be linked to the length of telomeres, which appears to be different in acne sufferers and ... Read more

Related support groups: Acne, Rosacea, Retin-A, Epiduo, Benzoyl Peroxide, Acne Treatment, Adapalene, Salicylic Acid, Finacea, Differin, Aczone, Compound W, Duac, Benzaclin, Duofilm, Atralin, Ziana, Adapalene/Benzoyl Peroxide, Retin A Micro Gel, Benzoyl Peroxide/Clindamycin

FDA: Anti-Aging, Skin-Lightening Products May Contain Mercury

Posted 4 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 3, 2016 – Some skin products contain mercury and pose a threat to your health, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns. It's important to check labels of skin creams, soaps and lotions. If "mercurous chloride," "calomel," "mercuric," "mercurio" or "mercury" is listed on the label, stop using the product immediately. Do not use products if ingredients are not listed, the agency says. Mercury is often found in cosmetics marketed as "anti-aging" or "skin lightening" that claim to remove age spots, freckles, blemishes and wrinkles. Some teens also use the products to treat acne, according to the FDA. Mercury-containing skin products are made in other countries and sold illegally in the United States, often in shops that cater to Hispanic, Asian, African and Middle Eastern communities. These products are also sold online, while some consumers buy them abroad and bring ... Read more

Related support groups: Dry Skin, Facial Wrinkles, Photoaging of the Skin, Dermatoheliosis, Mercury Poisoning, Minor Skin Conditions

Newer Treatments Can Make Scars Less Scary

Posted 3 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 2, 2016 – Scars can alter your appearance and remind you of a difficult time, potentially diminishing your quality of life, a skin specialist says. "While some may consider scarring to be a cosmetic concern, it can really affect patients' psychosocial health," Dr. Joseph Sobanko said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. "Physical appearance plays a major role in how people relate to others, so scarring that alters physical appearance – even if some would characterize it as minor – can have a negative impact on patients' quality of life," Sobanko explained. He's an assistant professor of dermatology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Sobanko's research found that some people are more bothered than others by scarring. Young people are more bothered than most, he said. People who have scars in highly visible locations such as ... Read more

Related support groups: Sunburn, Burns - External, Keloids, Scrapes, Cesarean Section, Minor Burns, Minor Skin Conditions

Health Tip: If You Have a Lot of Moles

Posted 29 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Having lots of moles may mean you're worried about skin cancer. Checking your skin often for changes and certain warning signs can help alleviate those fears. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends: Regularly inspect your skin, evaluating all of your moles. Look for any changes or unusual looking moles. See your dermatologist if any of your moles bleed, itch or change. Don't lie in the sun or use a tanning bed. Use sunscreen whenever outdoors to help prevent sunburn. See a dermatologist if you have 100 or more moles, or a significant portion of your body is covered with darker patches. Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Sunburn, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Sunscreen, Melanoma - Metastatic, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Photoaging of the Skin, Dermatoheliosis, History - Skin Cancer, Prevention of Sunburn, Coppertone, Minor Skin Conditions, Deeptan

Health Tip: Soothe Baby's Cradle Cap

Posted 26 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Scaly red patches of skin on baby's scalp are commonly called cradle cap. It's a form of seborrheic dermatitis, otherwise known as recurring or chronic eczema. The American Academy of Family Physicians suggests how to manage cradle cap: Wash the scalp with a non-medicated, gentle shampoo for babies. Ask the pediatrician for a suggested brand. Apply petroleum jelly, mineral oil or olive oil to the scalp to help scales loosen. Use a soft toothbrush to help loosen scales. Be gentle to avoid breaking the skin, which could lead to infection. Read more

Related support groups: Seborrheic Dermatitis, Dandruff, Minor Skin Conditions, Minor Skin Irritation

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