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Minor Skin Conditions News

Health Tip: Checking Your Child's Moles

Posted 13 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

-- If your child's mole changes frequently or otherwise looks suspicious, it's time to see a doctor. The American Academy of Dermatology says these warning signs shouldn't be ignored: A mole that grows or changes quickly, or looks different from any other mole. A mole that is dome-shaped, has an irregular border or is different colors. A mole that bleeds or looks like an open sore. Having 50 or more moles. Having a large mole. Read more

Related support groups: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Minor Skin Conditions, Minor Skin Irritation

Hollywood Villains Are No Dermatologist's Friend

Posted 5 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 5, 2017 – Movie villains often have a "look," and it's not a good one, a new study reports. Scary, evil characters in films tend to have certain types of less-than-attractive facial features – bulbous noses, warts and scars among them, the researchers said. But while these nasty personalities are fictional, the way they look could have real-life consequences for people who suffer from skin problems, the study authors warned. "Negative portrayals of skin conditions in film likely serve to perpetuate a tendency toward discrimination in our society, targeted at those with certain skin diseases," explained researcher Dr. Julia Croley, from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. In the new study, the investigators assessed the top 10 antagonists and protagonists from the American Film Institute's 100 Greatest Heroes and Villains List. Croley's team found ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Rosacea, Minor Skin Conditions, Minor Skin Irritation

New Eczema Drug Dupixent Gets FDA Approval

Posted 28 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 28, 2017 – Adults plagued by eczema may have a new treatment option, with a new drug approved Tuesday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Dupixent (dupilumab) injections treat moderate-to-severe eczema in patients whose condition is not controlled by topical treatments or who should not use topical treatments. Eczema inflames the skin, making it red and itchy. It's common in children, but can occur at any age and last a lifetime. "Eczema can cause significant skin irritation and discomfort for patients, so it is important to have a variety of treatment options available to patients, including those patients whose disease is not controlled by topical therapies," Dr. Julie Beitz said in an FDA news release. She is director of the Office of Drug Evaluation III in the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. However, the drug is far from cheap. A year's worth of ... Read more

Related support groups: Eczema, Dupixent, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

'Eraser Challenge' Latest Harmful Social Media Trend for Kids

Posted 22 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 22, 2017 – It's spreading via social media: A "dare" where kids use erasers to rub away the skin on their arms, often while reciting the alphabet or other phrases. Players compare the resulting injuries, and the most injured player is the "winner." The so-called "eraser challenge" has been circulating for about a year – but it's no joke, doctors warn. "The eraser challenge may cause pain, burns to the skin, scarring, local infections," said Dr. Michael Cooper, who directs the Burn Center at Staten Island University Hospital, in New York City. With such injuries, "in severe though rare cases, life-threatening sepsis, gangrene and loss of limb may occur," he noted. According to USA Today, East Iredell Middle School in Statesville, N.C., recently posted a warning on Facebook about the eraser challenge. "Kids are rubbing an eraser across their skin while having to do or ... Read more

Related support groups: Minor Burns, Wound Infection, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

Tattoo Artists Risk Serious Pain in the Neck

Posted 21 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 21, 2017 – That "ink" on your shoulder may have hurt the tattoo artist more than it hurt you. A small study – touted as the first to measure the causes of aches and pains in tattoo artists – points to widespread back and neck problems among them. "There's no such thing as an official 'tattoo chair,' so artists adapt dental chairs or massage tables to make a client comfortable, and then they hunch over the client to create the tattoo," said study co-author Carolyn Sommerich. The result: The artists perch forward, often crane their necks and place considerable strain on the trapezius muscles of the upper back. These muscles are a common problem area when it comes to back and neck pain. Sommerich, director of the Engineering Laboratory for Human Factors/Ergonomics/Safety at Ohio State University, and her colleagues published their findings in a recent issue of the journal ... Read more

Related support groups: Headache, Neck Pain, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Wound Cleansing, Minor Skin Irritation, Wound Debridement, Minor Skin Conditions

Health Tip: Treat Skin Well

Posted 14 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Achieving and maintaining healthy, glowing skin involve more than just keeping it clean. Here are suggestions from the American Academy of Dermatology: Apply sunscreen every day before you head outdoors. Look for one that's water resistant with an SPF of at least 30. Avoid smoking, which can age your skin and slow wound healing. Find ways to manage stress. Perform regular self-exams to look for signs of skin cancer. Wash your face when you wake, before bed and any time you sweat. Choose products designed for your skin type, such as sensitive, oily or dry. Never scrub your skin, which can be irritating. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Dry Skin, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Sunscreen, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, History - Skin Cancer, Coppertone, Minor Skin Irritation, Deeptan, Minor Skin Conditions

Skip the Antibiotics for Mild Eczema in Kids

Posted 14 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 – Despite widespread use, antibiotics are not an effective treatment for milder cases of the skin condition eczema in children, a new study contends. One pediatrician who reviewed the findings called them "terribly important" for eczema care. "This is a good example of a common situation in medicine," said Dr. Michael Grosso. "A particular intervention 'makes sense,' becomes common practice – and often becomes the so-called 'standard of care' – only to be proved ineffective when the therapy is subjected to scientific investigation." Grosso is chair of pediatrics at Northwell Health's Huntington Hospital in Huntington, N.Y. Eczema is an immunological condition affecting both children and adults, where patches of skin become inflamed, red and itchy. Dr. Craig Osleeb explained that "children with eczema have an overabundance of the bacteria normally found on ... Read more

Related support groups: Eczema, Penicillin VK, Cloxacillin, Dicloxacillin, Methicillin, Penicillin V Potassium, Nafcillin, Oxacillin, Penicillin G Benzathine, Procaine Penicillin, Pen-V, Isoject Permapen, Unipen, Bactocill, Nallpen, Veetids, Minor Skin Conditions, Bicillin C-R, Tegopen, Pen-Vee K

Itching for a Solution to That Rash?

Posted 5 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 3, 2017 – Maybe it's a new soap or the dry, cold weather that has turned your hands red and itchy. "There are many reasons for hand rashes," said Dr. Melissa Piliang, a board-certified dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. And the source of the problem isn't always obvious, she and other skin doctors say. An allergy to a new soap or something else you've touched can bring on a hand rash, but it could also reflect something going on inside your body, Piliang said in a news release from the American Academy of Dermatology. "The most common cause is eczema," Piliang said. Eczema is the term for different conditions that cause skin inflammation and irritation. "But some hand rashes may have an allergic cause. Sometimes, an allergy can develop after years of touching the same things daily without a problem, like your wedding ring, skin care products or foods such as ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Dry Skin, Fleet, Biafine, Skin Care, Vaseline, Aquaphor, Aveeno, Ammonium Lactate, Lanolin, Hylatopic, Complex-15, Concept, Carmol, Lubriderm, Cetaphil Cleanser, Replens, Eucerin

Don't Believe Everything You Read on Skin-Care Product Labels

Posted 3 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 3, 2017 – Some terms on skin-care product labels may mislead consumers, so people can't always rely on what they read on the package, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. "The language on the label is not always an accurate description of the product inside the bottle or its potential effects on your skin," Dr. Rajani Katta said in an academy news release. Katta is a clinical assistant professor of medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. "Manufacturers may use certain language for marketing purposes, and the same terms may mean different things on different products – and that makes it difficult to determine what they mean for our skin," Katta explained. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not regulate descriptions on skin-care product labels. That means terms such as "for sensitive skin" or "hypoallergenic" are no guarantee that a product ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Dry Skin, Skin and Structure Infection, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

New Eczema Drug Promising in Early Trial

Posted 2 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 2, 2017 – An experimental drug may significantly reduce the itching and improve the appearance of moderate to severe eczema, a new, preliminary trial finds. Nemolizumab is a man-made, injectable antibody that acts against the protein that has been identified as playing a part in eczema, the international team of researchers said. "The treatments for atopic dermatitis [eczema] have been disappointing because of their lack of efficacy and the long-term side effects," said Dr. Doris Day, a dermatologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. She had no role in the study. "There are also issues with compliance, since the products often need to be applied to broad areas multiple times a day," she added. Since this is a chronic condition, continued treatment is usually needed to maintain results, Day explained. "The goal is to find a non-steroid treatment that is easy to ... Read more

Related support groups: Eczema, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

Skin Diseases Take Big Slice Out of America's Health, Economy

Posted 2 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 2, 2017 – Skin diseases have a major impact on Americans and the U.S. economy, a new report finds. "The impact of skin disease in this country is staggering, affecting one in every four Americans each year and taking a toll on lives, livelihoods and our economy," said study leader Dr. Henry Lim, incoming president of the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). For the report, AAD researchers looked at medical claims data from 2013 on 24 skin diseases, and estimated that more than 85 million Americans are affected. People may think skin conditions aren't particularly serious, but half of the skin diseases included in the research could result in death. Skin cancers accounted for 60 percent of skin disease-related deaths, according to the report. The number of people in the United States with skin diseases in 2013 was higher than those with heart disease, diabetes or ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Skin Rash, Heart Disease, Psoriasis, Renal Failure, Insulin Resistance, Skin Cancer, Skin and Structure Infection, Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, History - Skin Cancer, Minor Skin Conditions, Minor Skin Irritation

Health Tip: Soothing a Minor Burn

Posted 23 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- While severe burns require a doctor's care, most minor burns can be carefully treated at home. The American Academy of Pediatrics offers these suggestions: Hold the burned area under cold running water for about five minutes to ease pain and swelling. Never ice or rub a burn, and never pop a blister that forms from a burn. Cover the area with a clean bandage that won't stick to the burn. Gently wash the area regularly with water and soap. Skip ointments unless recommended by your doctor. Avoid butter, grease and other home remedies. Read more

Related support groups: Sunburn, Burns - External, Minor Burns, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

Got an Itch? Use These Tips for Relief -- and Don't Scratch

Posted 31 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 31, 2017 – Itchy skin is a common problem, but there are several ways to find relief, a dermatologist says. "There are many reasons for itchy skin," Dr. Hassan Galadari said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. "It could be the result of a skin condition, such as eczema, shingles, hives or psoriasis, or it could be a sign of a contagious disease, like scabies or ringworm." To relieve itchy skin, Galadari offers these tips: Apply a cold, wet cloth or ice pack to the itchy area for five to 10 minutes or until the itch subsides. Or take an oatmeal bath. Use skin moisturizers that contain no additives, fragrances or perfumes. Apply topical anesthetics that contain pramoxine. Apply cooling agents such as menthol or calamine, or refrigerate your moisturizer to help achieve this cooling effect. Avoid scratching. It will irritate your skin and could lead to ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Herpes Zoster, Psoriasis, Eczema, Scabies, Plaque Psoriasis, Calamine, Varicella-Zoster, Menthol, Pramoxine, Anusol, Calmoseptine, Biofreeze, Analpram-HC, Terocin, Caladryl, Hydrocortisone/Pramoxine, Dendracin, Sarna, Caladryl Clear

Men: Here Are Ways to Healthier, Younger-Looking Skin

Posted 19 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2017 – Many men don't think about skin care but they should, a dermatologist says. The first step is to understand your skin type, according to Dr. Anthony Rossi. Sensitive skin may sting or burn after product use. Normal skin is clear and not sensitive. Dry skin is flaky, itchy or rough. Oily skin is shiny and greasy, and combination skin is dry in some places and oily in others, Rossi explained. "Understanding your skin type will help you learn how to take care of your skin and select skin care products that are right for you," Rossi said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. Rossi is assistant professor of dermatology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Weill Cornell Medical College, both in New York City If you're prone to acne, choose cleansers and moisturizers that are "oil-free" or "noncomedogenic," which means they won't clog your ... Read more

Related support groups: Acne, Rosacea, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Facial Wrinkles, Fleet, Biafine, Skin Care, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Vaseline, Aquaphor, Aveeno, Lanolin, Ammonium Lactate, Complex-15, Hylatopic, Concept, Carmol, Lubriderm

How to Exfoliate Safely and Give Your Skin a Healthy Glow

Posted 8 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Jan. 8, 2017 – Many skin care products promise to improve appearance by exfoliating – or removing dead cells – from the skin's outer layer. But sometimes, exfoliating can do more harm than good, according to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). "For some people, exfoliation can actually make their skin worse with increased redness or acne breakouts," said Dr. Rebecca Tung, associate professor of dermatology at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Ill. "If you choose to exfoliate, it's important to do so safely so that it does not damage your skin." Before exfoliating, consider your skin type, Tung advised in an AAD news release. Sensitive skin often burns or stings after use of skin care products. Normal skin is clear and not sensitive. Dry skin is flaky, itchy or rough. Oily skin is shiny and greasy. Combination skin is dry in some areas and oily in others. ... Read more

Related support groups: Acne, Skin Rash, Dry Skin, Rosacea, Hydroquinone, Facial Wrinkles, Fleet, Biafine, Tri-Luma, Skin Care, Vaseline, Aveeno, Aquaphor, Ammonium Lactate, Lanolin, Complex-15, Eldoquin, Hylatopic, Concept, CeraVe

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