Skip to Content

Join the 'Minor Burns' group to help and get support from people like you.

Minor Burns News

Related terms: Burns, minor

Health Tip: Prevent Fire Deaths and Injuries

Posted 1 day 11 hours ago by Drugs.com

-- The American Red Cross says it responds to more than 64,000 disasters annually – mostly home fires. Every day, about seven people are killed and 36 people hurt in home fires. The organization's goal is to cut these numbers by 25 percent by the year 2020. Here's what you can do to help, the Red Cross says: Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, including inside bedrooms and outside sleeping areas. Test smoke alarms monthly. If any aren't working, change the batteries. Talk with every family member about a fire escape plan. Practice the plan twice a year. If a fire breaks out, leave the home as quickly as possible and call for help immediately. Never go back inside. Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns

Daytime Wounds May Heal Faster Than Nighttime Ones

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 – Your internal body clock is the reason why wounds heal faster if an injury occurs during the day rather than at night, new research suggests. Experiments with skin cells and other cells in mice showed that daytime wounds healed about twice as fast as nighttime wounds. Then, when analyzing the wound recovery for 118 people with burn injuries, the researchers found that wounds that had occurred at night took 60 percent longer to heal than those that had occurred during the day. The body clock, also called your circadian rhythm, regulates wound healing by skin cells and optimizes healing during the day, the researchers concluded. They added that this could prove helpful for surgery and other medical procedures and might also lead to new drugs to improve wound healing. "We've shown that the daily cycles in our body clock control how well cells can repair damaged ... Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Scrapes, Minor Burns, Minor Cuts, Wound Infection, Minor Skin Conditions

Health Tip: Suggestions for a Healthy Halloween

Posted 9 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Children look forward to Halloween more than many other holidays, but the occasion doesn't come without potential dangers. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration suggests how to keep your family safer on Halloween: Store-bought costumes should be labeled "flame-resistant." If you make your own costume, use flame-resistant fabrics, such as polyester or nylon. Kids should wear bright, reflective costumes. Or add strips of reflective tape, so they'll be more visible. Children should always use a flashlight for better visibility. Kids should wear makeup and hats rather than masks that can obscure vision. Test the makeup first to see if it causes an allergic reaction. Children should never wear decorative contact lenses. Carefully inspect all candy. Check for allergens before allowing your child to eat any treats. Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns

Health Tip: Keep Kids Safe From Fire and Heat

Posted 27 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

-- It's important to teach children from a young age the danger of fire. By setting clear and concise fire-safety rules, you will decrease the likelihood of dangerous burns. TheU.S. Fire Administration offers these suggestions: Keep children at least three feet away from anything hot, such as candles,space heaters and stovetops. Keep smoking materials locked up in an out-of-reach place, Never leave cigarette lighters or matches where children can reach them. Never play with lighters or matches when you are with children. Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns

Americans Injuring Themselves Grooming Pubic Hair

Posted 16 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 16, 2017 – Should you consider trimming or shaving "down there," proceed with care – a new study finds injuries tied to pubic hair grooming are more common than you might think. Cuts, burns and infections are reported more than a quarter of the time, according to the online survey of more than 7,500 U.S. adults. "In another study, we found that 3 percent of all adults who were seen in the emergency room for urinary injuries had injuries related to pubic hair grooming," said lead researcher Dr. Benjamin Breyer. He's an associate professor of urology and epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of California, San Francisco. In this latest report, Breyer and his team found that nearly 67 percent of men and 85 percent of women said they groomed their pubic hair. Among those who did so, nearly 26 percent said they had injured themselves in the process. Injuries were ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Infections, Contraception, Plan B, Emergency Contraception, Depo-Provera, Nexplanon, Mirena, NuvaRing, Provera, Sprintec, Implanon, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Tri-Sprintec, Yasmin, Plan B One-Step, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, TriNessa

Health Tip: Seek Safety From Lightning

Posted 5 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

-- If you're caught outside during a thunderstorm, go inside immediately. If that's not possible, the National Weather Service suggests: Stay away from open fields, hilltops and ridge tops. Avoid tall objects, including single trees. In the woods, gather near a group of low trees. If you are with several people, stand apart to avoid the possibility of sharing lightning current. If you're camping, choose a low area. But remember that a tent offers no protection from lightning. Avoid anything that's wet. Also steer clear of metal objects, including fences and poles. Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns

FDA Medwatch Alert: Topical Products by Phillips Company: Recall - Due to Concerns of Manufacturing Practices

Posted 15 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

ISSUE: Phillips Company is voluntarily recalling all lots of Tetrastem, Diabecline, Tetracycline-ABC, VenomX, Acneen, StaphWash, StringMed, NoPain and LidoMed distributed by Phillips Company, with business offices located in Sun City, Arizona, to the retail level. The products are being recalled after an FDA inspection found significant manufacturing practices that calls into question the safety, identity, strength, quality and purity of unexpired drug products made at the firm during the past three years. Manufacturing practices that are not in adequate control represent the possibility of risk being introduced into the manufacturing process in decreased quality and consistency of the product. These may have an impact on the safety and efficacy of the product posing a risk to patients. To date, no adverse events have been reported. BACKGROUND: The topical antibiotic products are ... Read more

Related support groups: Scrapes, Minor Burns, Minor Cuts, Minor Skin Irritation

Fire Up the Grill Safely This Holiday Weekend

Posted 28 May 2017 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, May 27, 2017 – Safety should be on the front burner when you fire up the barbecue this Memorial Day, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says. Propane used in gas grills is highly flammable and about 30 people in the United States are injured each year due to gas grill fires and explosions. Many of these incidents occur when someone lights a grill that hasn't been used in a while, or just after refilling and reattaching the gas container. The CPSC said people should routinely perform a number of safety checks. Check the tubes that lead into the burner for blockages from insects or food grease. Use a pipe cleaner or wire to clear a blockage and push it through to the main part of the burner. Inspect gas hoses for cracking, brittleness, holes and leaks, and make sure there are no sharp bends in the hose or tubing. Keep gas hoses as far away as possible from hot ... Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns

Health Tip: Keep Newborns Safer

Posted 24 May 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Hundreds of babies die every year from accidents that are completely preventable. What can parents do to prevent a tragedy? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends: Whenever baby travels with you, always securely strap the infant into an appropriate car seat. The device should always be in the back seat and face toward the rear. Prevent falls by making sure baby is never left alone on any elevated surface. Secure stairs and other unsafe areas with a baby gate. Prevent burns by adjusting the temperature of your hot water heater to 120 degrees Fahrenheit or lower. Never hold a hot beverage while carrying baby. Prevent choking by carefully cutting up food into small pieces. Avoid giving baby foods that pose a choking hazard, such as hot dogs, grapes, carrots, popcorn, peanuts or apples. Make sure baby cannot reach small items that may cause choking. Do not put blankets, pillows ... Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns, Prevention of Falls

Cats Absorb Flame Retardants -- Likely That Children Do Too

Posted 5 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 4, 2017 – House cats can have high levels of flame-retardant chemicals in their blood, say researchers, warning that young children might, too. The contaminants were in house dust, according to Swedish researchers who took dust samples from 17 homes and blood samples from the resident cats. "The brominated flame retardants that have been measured in cats are known [hormone] disruptors," said study author Jana Weiss. She's with Stockholm University's department of environmental science and analytical chemistry. "It's particularly serious when small children ingest these [flame-retardant chemicals], because exposure during development could have consequences later in life, such as thyroid disease," Weiss said in a university news release. The fire-inhibiting chemicals are found in textiles, electronics and furniture. They eventually become dust and pose a health hazard, ... Read more

Related support groups: Poisoning, Burns - External, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Minor Burns

'Eraser Challenge' Latest Harmful Social Media Trend for Kids

Posted 22 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 22, 2017 – It's spreading via social media: A "dare" where kids use erasers to rub away the skin on their arms, often while reciting the alphabet or other phrases. Players compare the resulting injuries, and the most injured player is the "winner." The so-called "eraser challenge" has been circulating for about a year – but it's no joke, doctors warn. "The eraser challenge may cause pain, burns to the skin, scarring, local infections," said Dr. Michael Cooper, who directs the Burn Center at Staten Island University Hospital, in New York City. With such injuries, "in severe though rare cases, life-threatening sepsis, gangrene and loss of limb may occur," he noted. According to USA Today, East Iredell Middle School in Statesville, N.C., recently posted a warning on Facebook about the eraser challenge. "Kids are rubbing an eraser across their skin while having to do or ... Read more

Related support groups: Minor Burns, Wound Infection, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

Health Tip: Babysitter Safety

Posted 24 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Before letting a babysitter stay with your child, make sure the sitter knows the answers to a few basic safety questions. The University of Michigan Health System suggests discussing: The sitter's knowledge of CPR and first aid. The need to put babies to sleep on the back, with no blankets, pillows or toys in the crib. How to soothe a crying baby, and the dangers of shaking a baby. Choking hazards and food allergies. Never giving the child medication, unless specifically shown how by parents. Household safety, such as locking doors and turning on exterior lights, never letting anyone into the home, and knowing when to call the police or an ambulance. Never leaving a child alone in the bathtub, even for a moment. Fire-safety guidelines, including having several routes for leaving the home. Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Prevention of Fractures

Health Tip: Soothing a Minor Burn

Posted 23 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- While severe burns require a doctor's care, most minor burns can be carefully treated at home. The American Academy of Pediatrics offers these suggestions: Hold the burned area under cold running water for about five minutes to ease pain and swelling. Never ice or rub a burn, and never pop a blister that forms from a burn. Cover the area with a clean bandage that won't stick to the burn. Gently wash the area regularly with water and soap. Skip ointments unless recommended by your doctor. Avoid butter, grease and other home remedies. Read more

Related support groups: Sunburn, Burns - External, Minor Burns, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

Health Tip: Fire Safety in the Kitchen

Posted 6 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- There are a few things you should keep in mind any time you are using the kitchen stove. The American Red Cross suggests these fire safety guidelines: Never leave food cooking on the stove unattended. Turn the stove off if you must leave the room. Check on food often while cooking, and set a timer to remind you. Don't wear clothing with long or loose sleeves. Keep oven mitts, towels and other flammable objects away from the stove. Make sure children stay at least three feet from the stove. Keep kitchen surfaces clean, and get rid of any grease buildup immediately. Keep a fire extinguisher in your kitchen and install a smoke alarm in the room. Before going to bed or leaving the home, check the kitchen to make sure all appliances are turned off. Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns, Burns, Nitrogen Retention

Flameless Candle Batteries Pose Risk to Kids

Posted 4 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4, 2017 – Tiny button batteries that light up flameless "tea candles" pose a significant risk to children when swallowed, the National Capital Poison Center warns. The lithium batteries in the candles accounted for 14 percent of all the button batteries swallowed by children over the last two years, the center reported. That number is based on statistics from the 24-hour National Battery Ingestion Hotline. The batteries only have a diameter of just over three-quarters of an inch (20 millimeters). But these small batteries are potentially dangerous when swallowed. They have a higher voltage than some other batteries, and can cause severe burns in the esophagus (the tube that carries food from the throat to the stomach) if they get stuck there. The National Capital Poison Center said it was especially alarmed when its staff recently went shopping for flameless candle ... Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Minor Burns

Page 1 2 3 Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Minor Skin Conditions

Related Drug Support Groups

vitamin a & d, Sween, Renuu Patch, Renuu NL, A+D Zinc Oxide, Gordons Vite A, Clocream, Comfortine, Baza Clear, view more... allantoin / lidocaine / petrolatum, benzyl alcohol / pramoxine, benzocaine / triclosan, benzethonium chloride / dyclonine, benzethonium chloride / diphenhydramine / zinc acetate, benzethonium chloride / benzocaine / menthol, allantoin / petrolatum, Vexa-D