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Health Tip: Keep Newborns Safer

Posted 7 hours ago by Drugs.com

-- Hundreds of babies die every year from accidents that are completely preventable. What can parents do to prevent a tragedy? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends: Whenever baby travels with you, always securely strap the infant into an appropriate car seat. The device should always be in the back seat and face toward the rear. Prevent falls by making sure baby is never left alone on any elevated surface. Secure stairs and other unsafe areas with a baby gate. Prevent burns by adjusting the temperature of your hot water heater to 120 degrees Fahrenheit or lower. Never hold a hot beverage while carrying baby. Prevent choking by carefully cutting up food into small pieces. Avoid giving baby foods that pose a choking hazard, such as hot dogs, grapes, carrots, popcorn, peanuts or apples. Make sure baby cannot reach small items that may cause choking. Do not put blankets, pillows ... Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns, Prevention of Falls

Cats Absorb Flame Retardants -- Likely That Children Do Too

Posted 5 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 4, 2017 – House cats can have high levels of flame-retardant chemicals in their blood, say researchers, warning that young children might, too. The contaminants were in house dust, according to Swedish researchers who took dust samples from 17 homes and blood samples from the resident cats. "The brominated flame retardants that have been measured in cats are known [hormone] disruptors," said study author Jana Weiss. She's with Stockholm University's department of environmental science and analytical chemistry. "It's particularly serious when small children ingest these [flame-retardant chemicals], because exposure during development could have consequences later in life, such as thyroid disease," Weiss said in a university news release. The fire-inhibiting chemicals are found in textiles, electronics and furniture. They eventually become dust and pose a health hazard, ... Read more

Related support groups: Poisoning, Burns - External, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Minor Burns

'Eraser Challenge' Latest Harmful Social Media Trend for Kids

Posted 22 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 22, 2017 – It's spreading via social media: A "dare" where kids use erasers to rub away the skin on their arms, often while reciting the alphabet or other phrases. Players compare the resulting injuries, and the most injured player is the "winner." The so-called "eraser challenge" has been circulating for about a year – but it's no joke, doctors warn. "The eraser challenge may cause pain, burns to the skin, scarring, local infections," said Dr. Michael Cooper, who directs the Burn Center at Staten Island University Hospital, in New York City. With such injuries, "in severe though rare cases, life-threatening sepsis, gangrene and loss of limb may occur," he noted. According to USA Today, East Iredell Middle School in Statesville, N.C., recently posted a warning on Facebook about the eraser challenge. "Kids are rubbing an eraser across their skin while having to do or ... Read more

Related support groups: Minor Burns, Wound Infection, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

Health Tip: Babysitter Safety

Posted 24 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Before letting a babysitter stay with your child, make sure the sitter knows the answers to a few basic safety questions. The University of Michigan Health System suggests discussing: The sitter's knowledge of CPR and first aid. The need to put babies to sleep on the back, with no blankets, pillows or toys in the crib. How to soothe a crying baby, and the dangers of shaking a baby. Choking hazards and food allergies. Never giving the child medication, unless specifically shown how by parents. Household safety, such as locking doors and turning on exterior lights, never letting anyone into the home, and knowing when to call the police or an ambulance. Never leaving a child alone in the bathtub, even for a moment. Fire-safety guidelines, including having several routes for leaving the home. Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Prevention of Fractures

Health Tip: Soothing a Minor Burn

Posted 23 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- While severe burns require a doctor's care, most minor burns can be carefully treated at home. The American Academy of Pediatrics offers these suggestions: Hold the burned area under cold running water for about five minutes to ease pain and swelling. Never ice or rub a burn, and never pop a blister that forms from a burn. Cover the area with a clean bandage that won't stick to the burn. Gently wash the area regularly with water and soap. Skip ointments unless recommended by your doctor. Avoid butter, grease and other home remedies. Read more

Related support groups: Sunburn, Burns - External, Minor Burns, Minor Skin Irritation, Minor Skin Conditions

Health Tip: Fire Safety in the Kitchen

Posted 6 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- There are a few things you should keep in mind any time you are using the kitchen stove. The American Red Cross suggests these fire safety guidelines: Never leave food cooking on the stove unattended. Turn the stove off if you must leave the room. Check on food often while cooking, and set a timer to remind you. Don't wear clothing with long or loose sleeves. Keep oven mitts, towels and other flammable objects away from the stove. Make sure children stay at least three feet from the stove. Keep kitchen surfaces clean, and get rid of any grease buildup immediately. Keep a fire extinguisher in your kitchen and install a smoke alarm in the room. Before going to bed or leaving the home, check the kitchen to make sure all appliances are turned off. Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns, Burns, Nitrogen Retention

Flameless Candle Batteries Pose Risk to Kids

Posted 4 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4, 2017 – Tiny button batteries that light up flameless "tea candles" pose a significant risk to children when swallowed, the National Capital Poison Center warns. The lithium batteries in the candles accounted for 14 percent of all the button batteries swallowed by children over the last two years, the center reported. That number is based on statistics from the 24-hour National Battery Ingestion Hotline. The batteries only have a diameter of just over three-quarters of an inch (20 millimeters). But these small batteries are potentially dangerous when swallowed. They have a higher voltage than some other batteries, and can cause severe burns in the esophagus (the tube that carries food from the throat to the stomach) if they get stuck there. The National Capital Poison Center said it was especially alarmed when its staff recently went shopping for flameless candle ... Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Minor Burns

Christmas Cords Pose Danger to Little Ones

Posted 23 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 23, 2016 – While electrical burns to young children's mouths are rare, parents need to be aware that the danger is greatest during the holidays when extension cords and electrical wires are in plain sight, researchers report. "Although we often worry about injury from toppled appliances, parents also should be aware of the potential for electrical burns to the mouth caused by a child mouthing the end or biting through an electrical cord," study co-author Dr. David Chang said. Chang is an associate professor of otolaryngology at the University of Missouri. "In 1974, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission estimated 1,000 injuries associated with extension or appliance cord burns in a single year. Our study found that these injuries have decreased drastically to about 65 injuries a year. However, even one injury is too many when it can be prevented," Chang said in a ... Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns

Many Ignore Fire Safety at Home, Survey Reveals

Posted 22 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 22, 2016 – The holiday season can be a dangerous time of year, but many families ignore fire and burn safety tips, a new survey finds. Fewer than half of those surveyed by Shriners Hospitals for Children said they water live Christmas trees daily, though 70 percent knew they should to prevent fire. A quarter of respondents said they leave lit candles unattended, and 27 percent allow lit candles to be within reach of children. The survey also revealed that 47 percent of respondents don't keep a lid or cookie sheet nearby in order to cut off oxygen to a cooking fire. A quarter of the respondents said they don't turn pot handles to the back of the stove so kids can't grab them. "Some of these findings seem alarming, but each year our burn hospitals see the results – children who've been injured in cooking-related accidents or in fires associated with decorations or ... Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns

Holiday Decor Can Be Hazardous

Posted 21 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21, 2016 – Christmas lights, ornaments and other festive decorations are beautiful to look at, but parents need to remember that little ones are drawn to those shiny, glittering objects too, and those decorations may not always be safe to touch. That's the advice from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), which recommends that homes with small children shouldn't be filled with sharp or breakable decorations. Young children could also swallow or inhale small or removable pieces from larger decorations. Any ornaments or decorations that look like food or candy could also pose a risk to small children who can't tell the difference and are tempted to eat them, the AAP said in a news release. Also, be careful about poisonous plants. Mistletoe berries, Jerusalem cherry and holly berry adorn many homes during the holidays but many of these plants are toxic and could pose a ... Read more

Related support groups: Poisoning, Burns - External, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Minor Burns

Safety First When Stringing Holiday Lights

Posted 21 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 20, 2016 – Stringing up lights is a holiday tradition for many families, but it's important to use these and other electric decorations safely to prevent accidents and injuries, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Before putting lights on a Christmas tree, inspect each strand for frayed or exposed wires, broken sockets or loose connections – even if they are brand-new, the AAP advises. The group also makes the following safety recommendations: Never put lights on a metallic tree. Anyone who touches a metallic tree with faulty lights could be electrocuted. Lights should be kept out of children's reach. The wire coating and bulb sockets of some strands may contain a significant amount of lead. Those handling lights should also wash their hands afterwards. Use outdoor lights that have been certified for outdoor use. This should be indicated on their ... Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns

When Buying a Christmas Tree, Think Safety First

Posted 11 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Dec. 10, 2016 – Choosing the perfect Christmas tree is a fun tradition for many families, but it's important to consider fire safety when decorating for the holidays, a pediatricians' group advises. People who opt for an artificial tree should make sure it's fire-resistant. This should be noted on its label, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. If you're buying a live Christmas tree for your home, the group recommends the following precautions: Pick a fresh tree. Many people look for trees that are a certain size or shape, but it's also important to make sure it's not dried out. Dry trees may become a fire hazard. A fresh tree is green and its needles don't break or drop off its branches easily. The trunk of a fresh tree is also sticky. Trim the trunk. Cutting a few inches off the trunk of the tree exposes fresh wood. This enables the tree to absorb water more ... Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns, Prevention of Fractures

Health Tip: Watch for Open Flames

Posted 7 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

-- The holidays are a prime time for home fires spurred by lit candles or fireplaces. To help prevent such fires, the U.S. National Safety Council suggests: Don't leave a candle burning in any room unsupervised. Make sure lit candles are out of a child's reach. Use lit candles only on surfaces that are sturdy and stable. Keep lit candles away from holiday trees, curtains and flammable objects. Don't put wrapping paper, tree limbs or wreaths in your fireplace to burn. Thoroughly clean and inspect all fireplaces and chimneys annually. Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns

Health Tip: Keep Kids Safe During the Holidays

Posted 22 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- A host of new hazards for young children creep up during the holidays. Here are suggestions for parents and caregivers to help keep kids safe, courtesy of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Supervise young children at all times, particularly when they are eating and playing. Make sure any choking hazards, harmful drinks, household chemicals and toys are kept where children can't reach them. Monitor that children play with toys safely. Learn how to help a child who is choking. Set safety rules. Read more

Related support groups: Minor Burns, Prevention of Fractures

Health Tip: Teach Your Family Fire Safety

Posted 7 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Time is of the essence if there's a fire in your home. Make sure your family is ready to act fast in an emergency. Here's what the American Red Cross suggests: Buy an appropriate number of smoke alarms, and test them monthly. Make sure children know what smoke alarms sound like, and what to do if they hear the sound. Everyone in your home should know how to call 911 and to "stop, drop and roll" if clothing catches fire. Create a fire escape plan with two ways to escape from every room. Make sure every family member knows the plan. Designate an outdoor meeting spot for the family. Hold a fire drill twice yearly. Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns

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