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Flameless Candle Batteries Pose Risk to Kids

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4, 2017 – Tiny button batteries that light up flameless "tea candles" pose a significant risk to children when swallowed, the National Capital Poison Center warns. The lithium batteries in the candles accounted for 14 percent of all the button batteries swallowed by children over the last two years, the center reported. That number is based on statistics from the 24-hour National Battery Ingestion Hotline. The batteries only have a diameter of just over three-quarters of an inch (20 millimeters). But these small batteries are potentially dangerous when swallowed. They have a higher voltage than some other batteries, and can cause severe burns in the esophagus (the tube that carries food from the throat to the stomach) if they get stuck there. The National Capital Poison Center said it was especially alarmed when its staff recently went shopping for flameless candle ... Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Minor Burns

Christmas Cords Pose Danger to Little Ones

Posted 23 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 23, 2016 – While electrical burns to young children's mouths are rare, parents need to be aware that the danger is greatest during the holidays when extension cords and electrical wires are in plain sight, researchers report. "Although we often worry about injury from toppled appliances, parents also should be aware of the potential for electrical burns to the mouth caused by a child mouthing the end or biting through an electrical cord," study co-author Dr. David Chang said. Chang is an associate professor of otolaryngology at the University of Missouri. "In 1974, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission estimated 1,000 injuries associated with extension or appliance cord burns in a single year. Our study found that these injuries have decreased drastically to about 65 injuries a year. However, even one injury is too many when it can be prevented," Chang said in a ... Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns

Many Ignore Fire Safety at Home, Survey Reveals

Posted 22 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 22, 2016 – The holiday season can be a dangerous time of year, but many families ignore fire and burn safety tips, a new survey finds. Fewer than half of those surveyed by Shriners Hospitals for Children said they water live Christmas trees daily, though 70 percent knew they should to prevent fire. A quarter of respondents said they leave lit candles unattended, and 27 percent allow lit candles to be within reach of children. The survey also revealed that 47 percent of respondents don't keep a lid or cookie sheet nearby in order to cut off oxygen to a cooking fire. A quarter of the respondents said they don't turn pot handles to the back of the stove so kids can't grab them. "Some of these findings seem alarming, but each year our burn hospitals see the results – children who've been injured in cooking-related accidents or in fires associated with decorations or ... Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns

Holiday Decor Can Be Hazardous

Posted 21 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21, 2016 – Christmas lights, ornaments and other festive decorations are beautiful to look at, but parents need to remember that little ones are drawn to those shiny, glittering objects too, and those decorations may not always be safe to touch. That's the advice from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), which recommends that homes with small children shouldn't be filled with sharp or breakable decorations. Young children could also swallow or inhale small or removable pieces from larger decorations. Any ornaments or decorations that look like food or candy could also pose a risk to small children who can't tell the difference and are tempted to eat them, the AAP said in a news release. Also, be careful about poisonous plants. Mistletoe berries, Jerusalem cherry and holly berry adorn many homes during the holidays but many of these plants are toxic and could pose a ... Read more

Related support groups: Poisoning, Burns - External, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Minor Burns

Safety First When Stringing Holiday Lights

Posted 21 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 20, 2016 – Stringing up lights is a holiday tradition for many families, but it's important to use these and other electric decorations safely to prevent accidents and injuries, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Before putting lights on a Christmas tree, inspect each strand for frayed or exposed wires, broken sockets or loose connections – even if they are brand-new, the AAP advises. The group also makes the following safety recommendations: Never put lights on a metallic tree. Anyone who touches a metallic tree with faulty lights could be electrocuted. Lights should be kept out of children's reach. The wire coating and bulb sockets of some strands may contain a significant amount of lead. Those handling lights should also wash their hands afterwards. Use outdoor lights that have been certified for outdoor use. This should be indicated on their ... Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns

When Buying a Christmas Tree, Think Safety First

Posted 11 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Dec. 10, 2016 – Choosing the perfect Christmas tree is a fun tradition for many families, but it's important to consider fire safety when decorating for the holidays, a pediatricians' group advises. People who opt for an artificial tree should make sure it's fire-resistant. This should be noted on its label, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. If you're buying a live Christmas tree for your home, the group recommends the following precautions: Pick a fresh tree. Many people look for trees that are a certain size or shape, but it's also important to make sure it's not dried out. Dry trees may become a fire hazard. A fresh tree is green and its needles don't break or drop off its branches easily. The trunk of a fresh tree is also sticky. Trim the trunk. Cutting a few inches off the trunk of the tree exposes fresh wood. This enables the tree to absorb water more ... Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns, Prevention of Fractures

Health Tip: Watch for Open Flames

Posted 7 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

-- The holidays are a prime time for home fires spurred by lit candles or fireplaces. To help prevent such fires, the U.S. National Safety Council suggests: Don't leave a candle burning in any room unsupervised. Make sure lit candles are out of a child's reach. Use lit candles only on surfaces that are sturdy and stable. Keep lit candles away from holiday trees, curtains and flammable objects. Don't put wrapping paper, tree limbs or wreaths in your fireplace to burn. Thoroughly clean and inspect all fireplaces and chimneys annually. Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns

Health Tip: Keep Kids Safe During the Holidays

Posted 22 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- A host of new hazards for young children creep up during the holidays. Here are suggestions for parents and caregivers to help keep kids safe, courtesy of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Supervise young children at all times, particularly when they are eating and playing. Make sure any choking hazards, harmful drinks, household chemicals and toys are kept where children can't reach them. Monitor that children play with toys safely. Learn how to help a child who is choking. Set safety rules. Read more

Related support groups: Minor Burns, Prevention of Fractures

Health Tip: Teach Your Family Fire Safety

Posted 7 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Time is of the essence if there's a fire in your home. Make sure your family is ready to act fast in an emergency. Here's what the American Red Cross suggests: Buy an appropriate number of smoke alarms, and test them monthly. Make sure children know what smoke alarms sound like, and what to do if they hear the sound. Everyone in your home should know how to call 911 and to "stop, drop and roll" if clothing catches fire. Create a fire escape plan with two ways to escape from every room. Make sure every family member knows the plan. Designate an outdoor meeting spot for the family. Hold a fire drill twice yearly. Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns

Tips for Keeping Halloween Safe and Fun

Posted 21 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 – Trick-or-treating, bobbing for apples and costume parties are just a few things kids love about Halloween, but holiday fun can put them at risk, health experts warn. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services offers parents these tips to help keep Halloween safe and fun: Beware of sugar overload. Don't trick-or-treat on an empty stomach. Make sure your children have a light meal or healthy snack before heading out. Keep an eye out for candy tampering. Always check kids' candy before letting them eat it. Discard anything that looks discolored or odd, has pinholes or torn wrappers. Avoid allergy triggers. Teach kids with allergies to search for allergens on the ingredients list of any treats they receive. They should never eat home-baked goods. Remove choking hazards. Very young children should not be allowed to have treats that could cause choking, such as ... Read more

Related support groups: Minor Burns

Health Tip: Install Smoke Detectors at Home

Posted 15 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Installing smoke alarms in your home is one of the most important steps you can take to protect your family. The American Red Cross advises: Place smoke alarms throughout the home, including in rooms where people sleep, on each level and outside each bedroom. Make sure children know what a smoke detector sounds like, and that they know what to do if they hear one. Perform monthly tests on your devices, changing batteries at least annually. Get new smoke detectors every ten years. Never turn off a smoke detector. Don't use a carbon monoxide alarm in place of a smoke detector. They serve different purposes. Know how they both work and why both are needed. Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns, Burns, Nitrogen Retention

Kitchen Cooking Burns a Real Danger for Kids

Posted 19 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 19, 2016 – The day she ended up with second- and third-degree burns on her back, 4-year-old Giuliana Maggio was just busy doing what 4-year-olds do: running around the house, playing hide-and-seek during a family gathering. Giuliana never saw the electrical cord running from the wall to the hot slow cooker sitting on the kitchen table. She ran into the cord, and pulled the scalding hot contents of the slow cooker on to her small body. Fortunately, her mother is a registered nurse and knew she had to act quickly. The family called 911, and Dina Maggio immediately put her daughter in the shower to run cool water over the burned area. "As the cold water ran over her, and clothing was removed, I could see the layers of skin coming off and knew it was bad," Maggio said. The little girl had second- and third-degree burns on her arms and lower back. She was taken to Loyola ... Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns

Newer Treatments Can Make Scars Less Scary

Posted 3 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 2, 2016 – Scars can alter your appearance and remind you of a difficult time, potentially diminishing your quality of life, a skin specialist says. "While some may consider scarring to be a cosmetic concern, it can really affect patients' psychosocial health," Dr. Joseph Sobanko said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. "Physical appearance plays a major role in how people relate to others, so scarring that alters physical appearance – even if some would characterize it as minor – can have a negative impact on patients' quality of life," Sobanko explained. He's an assistant professor of dermatology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Sobanko's research found that some people are more bothered than others by scarring. Young people are more bothered than most, he said. People who have scars in highly visible locations such as ... Read more

Related support groups: Sunburn, Burns - External, Keloids, Scrapes, Cesarean Section, Minor Burns, Minor Skin Conditions

Don't Let Your Campfire Become a Wildfire

Posted 22 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 22, 2016 – Campfires can provide the backdrop for lots of outdoor fun. But, if people are careless, those campfires can spark a damaging wildfire, the New York Department of Environmental Conservation says. So, how can you safely have a campfire? First, use existing campfire rings whenever you can. Or, if you're in a remote area, consider using a small portable stove instead of a campfire. If you can't find an existing campfire ring, take care to situate your campfire away from tree branches, steep slopes, rotten tree stumps, logs, dry grass, leaves and other vegetation that could catch fire. Extra wood should also be stored at a safe distance from a campfire site, the New York state conservation experts cautioned. The agency also provided the following safety tips for campfires: Campfires must be less than 3 feet high and 4 feet in diameter. Only charcoal or untreated ... Read more

Related support groups: Burns - External, Minor Burns

Health Tip: Be Smart During a Power Outage

Posted 15 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Power outages can be dangerous if you don't follow safety precautions. The Red Cross suggests: Keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible. Food generally will last inside these unpowered appliances for four hours. Unplug electronics and other electrical equipment. This will protect the equipment against electrical surges when power returns. Keep one light plugged in and turned on so you can see when power is restored. Avoid travel, particularly by car, since traffic lights may not be working. If you use a generator, make sure you carefully follow the product's instructions. Never run a generator inside the home. Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Minor Burns, Prevention of Fractures

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