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Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection News

Related terms: MRSA Infection, MRSA, Community-acquired MRSA, CA-MRSA, Hospital-acquired MRSA, HA-MRSA

'Superbug' May Be More Widespread Than Thought

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 16, 2017 – A type of potentially deadly drug-resistant bacteria is more widespread in U.S. hospitals than previously thought and needs to be more closely monitored, a new study suggests. Researchers checked for cases of illness caused by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) in a sample of four U.S. hospitals and identified a wide variety of CRE species. Three hospitals are in the Boston area and one is in California. The CRE family of germs causes about 9,300 infections and 600 deaths in the United States each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Those numbers are on the rise, the researchers said. CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden has called CRE "nightmare bacteria" due to their resistance to carbapenems, which are last-resort antibiotics used to treat drug-resistant infections. In the study, the researchers also discovered that CRE ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Ertapenem, Meropenem, Invanz, Merrem, Cilastatin/Imipenem, Primaxin IM, Primaxin IV, Doribax, Doripenem, Merrem Novaplus

'Superbug' Resistant to All Antibiotics Killed Nevada Woman

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 13, 2017 – A Nevada woman in her 70s who'd recently returned from India died in September from a "superbug" infection that resisted all antibiotics, according to a report released Friday. The case raises concern about the spread of such infections, which have become more common over past decades as germs have developed resistance to widely used antibiotics. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention "basically reported that there was nothing in our medicine cabinet to treat this lady," report co-author Dr. Randall Todd told the Reno Gazette-Journal. He's director of epidemiology and public health preparedness for the Washoe County Health District, in Reno. The report was published Jan. 13 in the CDC journal Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. As reported by Todd and his colleagues, the woman fractured her right leg while in India and underwent multiple ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Ertapenem, Meropenem, Invanz, Merrem, Cilastatin/Imipenem, Primaxin IM, Primaxin IV, Doribax, Doripenem, Merrem Novaplus

'Superbug' Infections Down 30 Percent at VA Hospitals

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 6, 2017 – Rates of a deadly "superbug" called methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, have dropped steadily at hospitals and long-term care health care facilities run by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs over the past eight years, according to a new report. Between 2007 and 2015, rates of monthly MRSA infections rates fell 37 percent in VA intensive care units. Infections in non-ICUs fell by about 30 percent, the study found. Even larger reductions were seen in overall health care-acquired infections, which declined 80 percent or more in both ICUs and non-ICUs, researchers reported. "We speculate that active surveillance was the primary driver of the downward trends seen in the VA," said study lead author Dr. Martin Evans, who is with the agency. "Understanding how and why rates of MRSA have diminished in recent years is essential for the continued ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Bacteremia, Gram Negative Infection

'Superbug' Gene Spotted on U.S. Pig Farm

Posted 5 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 5, 2016 – Scientists have identified a troubling new type of antibiotic resistance among U.S. farm animals. The drugs at issue are the carbapenem class of antibiotics. In hospitals, such drugs are considered a last line of defense against hard-to-treat bacterial infections. In the United States, carbapenem antibiotics have been banned for veterinary use, to minimize the risk that antibiotic resistance might develop among animals and spread to humans. And though it has already been identified among European and Asian livestock, there had been no indication of a resistance problem on American farms until now. But, following a five-month screening of a single American pig farm in 2015, researchers concluded that carbapenem resistance has in fact gained a foothold in U.S. livestock. "For now, we think that this is a rare and unusual occurrence," said study author Thomas ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Ertapenem, Meropenem, Invanz, Merrem, Primaxin IM, Cilastatin/Imipenem, Primaxin IV, Doribax, Doripenem, Merrem Novaplus

'Superbug' Common Among N.C. Hog Workers, Study Says

Posted 18 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 – Some workers at hog production facilities in the United States have skin infections from drug-resistant "superbugs," researchers report. Hogs are given antibiotics to speed their growth. But, overuse of the drugs has been linked to the development of bacteria that don't respond to many antibiotics commonly used to treat staph infections, the researchers said in background notes. "This study suggests that carrying these bacteria may not always be harmless to humans," said study leader Christopher Heaney. He's an assistant professor with the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. Previously, it was known that many hog workers had these bacteria in their noses, but it wasn't clear if the workers were at increased risk of infection, Heaney said. This study included 103 hog facility workers in North Carolina and 80 child and adult ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Skin Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Bacteremia

More U.S. Kids Getting Drug-Resistant Infections

Posted 17 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 – Antibiotic-resistant infections are on the rise among American children, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed blood samples collected from kids aged 1 to 17 who received outpatient, inpatient, intensive care unit and long-term care between 1999 and 2012. During that time, the rates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria samples that were resistant to at least three types of antibiotics rose from about 15 percent to 26 percent, the investigators found. Meanwhile, the rate of bacteria samples resistant to carbapenems – a class of antibiotics considered one of the treatments of last resort for highly resistant infections – rose from just over 9 percent to 20 percent. Drug resistance was more common among children in intensive care units, those aged 13 to 17, and those in the Midwest, the findings showed. The study offers more evidence of the need for aggressive ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Bacteremia

Nurses' 'Scrubs' Pick Up Bad Hospital Germs

Posted 27 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 – The "scrubs" of intensive care unit (ICU) nurses often pick up disease-causing germs, including those resistant to antibiotics, a new study reports. "We know there are bad germs in hospitals, but we're just beginning to understand how they are spread," said study lead author Dr. Deverick Anderson, an associate professor of medicine at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, N.C. These bad germs spread from patients to the nurses' uniforms (usually the sleeves and pockets) and objects around the room, most often to bed railings, the researchers found. "This study is a good wake-up call that health care personnel need to concentrate on the idea that the health care environment can be contaminated," said Anderson. "Any type of patient care, or even just entry into a room where care is provided, truly should be considered a chance for interacting with ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection

Drug-Resistant Germs Thrive in America's Corroding Water Systems

Posted 23 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 23, 2016 – The thousands of miles of aging, corroding pipes that bring water to Americans each day may be home to dangerous drug-resistant bacteria, a new report warns. These harmful bacteria include legionella, which causes Legionnaires' disease; pseudomonas, which can trigger pneumonia; and mycobacteria, which can cause tuberculosis and other illnesses, the researchers said. While these bacteria thrive in many environments, they "can [also] live in the pipes; they can survive on tiny amounts of nutrients found in water," explained lead researcher Dr. Jeffrey Griffiths, a professor of public health and medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston. Overall, his team's analysis of 100 million Medicare records found that between 1991 and 2006, more than 617,000 older Americans were hospitalized after falling ill from infection with these three common bacteria ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Tuberculosis, Legionella Pneumonia

New MRSA Strain Found in Denmark

Posted 23 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 23, 2016 – Researchers in Denmark have identified a new form of the superbug known as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) that they suspect may be spread through eating contaminated poultry. People who raise livestock are known to face a higher risk for MRSA, the researchers said. But, the new strain infected 10 urban-dwelling people who hadn't been working on a farm and had no direct contact with live farm animals. Instead, the researchers believe the MRSA patients were infected after eating or handling poultry that had been imported from other European countries. "This is one of the first studies providing compelling evidence that everyday consumers are also potentially at risk," study author Lance Price said in a news release from George Washington University (GWU), in Washington, D.C. Price serves as director of the Antibiotic Resistance Action Center ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection

CDC: Too Many Antibiotics Still Being Prescribed in U.S.

Posted 19 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 19, 2016 – Despite growing concerns about creating drug-resistant bacteria, overprescribing of antibiotics in U.S. hospitals didn't drop between 2006 and 2012, according to a new federal report. Over that time period, 55 percent of patients received at least one dose of antibiotics during their hospital stay, whether it was needed or not, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. "Antibiotic use remains common, and use of the most powerful antibiotics is rising," said lead researcher James Baggs, a CDC epidemiologist. Although the use of antibiotics remained about the same during the study period, a significant increase was seen in the use of newer antibiotics, Baggs said. "Because inappropriate antibiotic use increases the risk of antibiotic resistance and other side effects, continued monitoring of antibiotic use is critical to future ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Amoxicillin, Doxycycline, Bacterial Infection, Bactrim, Cipro, Ciprofloxacin, Augmentin, Levaquin, Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole, Nitrofurantoin, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Minocycline, Bacterial Skin Infection, Levofloxacin, Macrobid, Clavulanate, Bactrim DS, Tetracycline

Connecticut Toddler Latest U.S. Case of 'Superbug'

Posted 11 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 9, 2016 – Scientists have identified a new patient who carried a type of bacteria that is resistant to an antibiotic of last resort, bringing the number of cases reported in the United States to four. All of the patients had E. coli with a gene called mcr-1, which makes the bacteria resistant to the antibiotic colistin, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The latest case, a 2-year-old Connecticut girl, was diagnosed in June after she returned from a trip to the Caribbean, said senior researcher Maroya Spalding Walters, a CDC epidemiologist. "The girl had an illness that caused diarrhea, which began in mid-June while she was traveling overseas. Her diarrhea was not caused by the bacteria that had the mcr-1 gene – the cause has not been definitively diagnosed," she said. Although the mcr-1 gene was found, it wasn't producing toxins. When the ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Diarrhea, Bacterial Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Diarrhea, Acute, Infectious Diarrhea

Humans Can Pass Staph Germs to Monkeys

Posted 29 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 – A new study finds that monkeys can acquire Staphylococcus aureus bacteria from people. Many deadly diseases in people originally came from animals, but this study shows that dangerous pathogens can also move from people to animals, the researchers said. The investigators discovered that certain strains of S. aureus in green monkeys in The Gambia were acquired from humans. Most of the human-to-monkey transmission likely occurred 2,700 years ago. But two of the S. aureus transfers occurred about 30 years ago and about seven years ago, the findings showed. Those recent transmissions are likely the result of human encroachment into the monkeys' natural habitat, and probably resulted from bacteria transferred from human hands to food that was fed to monkeys, according to the study authors. "Although wild, these monkeys are very acclimated to humans, who often feed ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Diagnosis and Investigation

New Antibiotic Discovered in the Nose

Posted 29 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

A new antibiotic has been discovered in people's noses. German researchers analyzed germs that inhabit the human body and found that about 30 percent of people had Staphylococcus aureus bacteria in their noses, but 70 percent did not, the Associated Press reported. Those without S. aureus have another type of bacteria – Staphyloccus lugdunensis – in the nose that produces an antibiotic that keeps S. aureus in check, according to the study published online in the journal Nature. The scientists isolated this antibiotic, which they call lugdunin, and found that it was effective in treating mice whose skin was infected with S. aureus, the AP reported. Lugdunin may offer a new way to fight antibiotic-resistant staph bacteria, one of the superbugs that pose a major health threat worldwide. Tests of lugdunin in humans have yet to be conducted. Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Diagnosis and Investigation

Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Detected in Sewage Spill

Posted 22 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 22, 2016 – Sewer line breaks can release antibiotic-resistant bacteria that pose a public health threat, a new study says. Consider the 2014 sewer line break in St. Petersburg, Fla., that released 500,000 gallons of untreated wastewater into neighborhoods and Boca Ciega Bay. University of South Florida researchers who did follow-up testing of soil and water said they detected genes from vancomycin-resistant bacteria for nearly two weeks after the sewer line break. One of those genes is capable of transferring vancomycin resistance to other strains of bacteria. Vancomycin, considered an antibiotic of last resort, is used to treat serious infections that don't respond to other antibiotics, the researchers noted. "While we have known that raw sewage contains many disease-causing bacteria, this experience tells us that sewage and fecal pollution also carry vancomycin-resistant ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Adjunct to Antibiotic Therapy

U.S. Cases of Drug-Resistant Gonorrhea Rise Fourfold in One Year

Posted 15 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 14, 2016 – Antibiotic-resistant cases of the sexually transmitted illness gonorrhea have more than quadrupled in the United States. This new data, from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, should serve as a warning that "the future of current treatment options may be in jeopardy," the agency said in a news release issued Thursday. "The confluence of emerging drug resistance and very limited alternative options for treatment creates a perfect storm for future gonorrhea treatment failure in the U.S.," said Dr. Jonathan Mermin, who directs the CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and Tuberculosis Prevention. "History shows us that bacteria will find a way to outlast the antibiotics we're using to treat it," Mermin said. "We are running just one step ahead in order to preserve the remaining treatment option for as long as possible." For ... Read more

Related support groups: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Gonococcal Infection - Uncomplicated, Gonococcal Infection - Disseminated, Gonococcal Infection

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