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Mantle Cell Lymphoma News

Get Active, Beat Lymphoma?

Posted 4 hours 51 minutes ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 12, 2017 – Physical activity appears to help people with lymphoma survive their disease. That finding comes from a new study by Mayo Clinic researchers of nearly 4,100 people with lymphoma, a cancer that starts in the white blood cells that normally help fight infection. "As physicians, we recommend physical activity for all cancer survivors to improve overall quality of life, but we did not know if physical activity would have an impact on survival in lymphoma patients," said study author Dr. Priyanka Pophali, a hematologist at Mayo Clinic. "Our findings show that physical activity can have a positive impact on survival in lymphoma patients," she said in a Mayo news release. Through periodic questionnaires, the researchers tracked the participants' physical activity levels from before their cancer diagnoses until three years afterwards. People whose physical activity was ... Read more

Related support groups: Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Follicular Lymphoma, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Burkitt Lymphoma, Mantle Cell Lymphoma, Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

FDA Approves Calquence (acalabrutinib) for Adults with Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Posted 31 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

October 31, 2017 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Calquence (acalabrutinib) for the treatment of adults with mantle cell lymphoma who have received at least one prior therapy. “Mantle cell lymphoma is a particularly aggressive cancer,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence and acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “For patients who have not responded to treatment or have relapsed, Calquence provides a new treatment option that has shown high rates of response for some patients in initial studies.” Mantle cell lymphoma is a rare and fast-growing type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and, according to the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health, represents 3 to 10 percent of all non-Hodgkin lymphoma cases in t ... Read more

Related support groups: Lymphoma, Mantle Cell Lymphoma, Calquence, Acalabrutinib

Calquence Approved for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Posted 31 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 31, 2017 – Calquence (acalabrutinib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with mantle cell lymphoma. Mantle cell is an aggressive, fast-growing non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a cancer of the lymph system. Though it represents only 3 percent to 10 percent of non-Hodgkin cases in the United States, the cancer usually has spread by the time it's detected, the FDA said in a news release on Tuesday. "For patients who have not responded to treatment or who have relapsed, Calquence provides a new treatment option that has shown high rates or response for some patients in initial studies," said Dr. Richard Pazdur, director of the agency's Oncology Center of Excellence. Calquence is a kinase inhibitor that's designed to block an enzyme that cancer cells use to multiply, the FDA said. The drug was evaluated in a clinical study of 124 people with mantle ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Lymphoma, Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Calquence Approved for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Posted 31 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 31, 2017 – Calquence (acalabrutinib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with mantle cell lymphoma. Mantle cell is an aggressive, fast-growing non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a cancer of the lymph system. Though it represents only 3 percent to 10 percent of non-Hodgkin cases in the United States, the cancer usually has spread by the time it's detected, the FDA said in a news release on Tuesday. "For patients who have not responded to treatment or who have relapsed, Calquence provides a new treatment option that has shown high rates or response for some patients in initial studies," said Dr. Richard Pazdur, director of the agency's Oncology Center of Excellence. Calquence is a kinase inhibitor that's designed to block an enzyme that cancer cells use to multiply, the FDA said. The drug was evaluated in a clinical study of 124 people with mantle ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Lymphoma, Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Adding Rituximab to Standard Care May Prolong Lymphoma Survival

Posted 28 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 27, 2017 – Long-term treatment with the drug rituximab (Rituxan) may extend the lives of some patients with a rare form of blood cancer, a new clinical trial finds. The disease, known as mantle-cell lymphoma, is generally incurable. But various treatments can prolong people's lives. Some patients, for instance, are able to undergo chemotherapy to wipe out the cancer cells, followed by a stem cell transplant – to restore normal blood cells. But while that approach can be effective for a while, most patients see the cancer come back. So the new trial, funded by Rituxan maker Roche, looked at whether an additional step could help: Having patients take Rituxan for three years following their stem cell transplant. Overall, researchers found, the tactic did improve patients' outlook. After four years, 83 percent of rituximab patients were still alive and progression-free – ... Read more

Related support groups: Rituxan, Lymphoma, Rituximab, Mantle Cell Lymphoma, Rituxan Hycela, Hyaluronidase/rituximab

DNA Sequencing May Lead to Personalized Cancer Treatment

Posted 9 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 9, 2016 – DNA sequencing may help personalize treatment for people with lymphoma, a new study suggests. By analyzing small bits of DNA in the blood, researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine said they could determine the cancer's subtype. They said they could also identify mutations that might make treatment less effective or worsen a patient's prognosis. The study authors said their findings add to growing evidence that noninvasive, blood-based biopsies may help detect cancer earlier by tracking its evolution. They said this test may also significantly change how the disease is treated. "Now we can identify the subtype of the tumor, watch how it changes over time and begin to tailor our chemotherapy choices based on the presence or absence of specific mutations," said study co-senior author Dr. Ash Alizadeh, an assistant professor of medicine/oncology. ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Follicular Lymphoma, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma, Diagnosis and Investigation, Mantle Cell Lymphoma, Burkitt Lymphoma, Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma, Conjunctival Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma

Immune Therapy Makes Headway Against a Lymphoma

Posted 8 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 8, 2016 – Genetically engineered immune cells appear capable of eradicating non-Hodgkin lymphoma when coupled with effective chemotherapy, a new early trial finds. In this experimental therapy, white blood cells known as T-cells are removed from the patient's bloodstream. Then they're genetically modified so they can detect and attack cancerous B-cells, another type of white blood cell in which most types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma occur. One-third of 32 patients treated with the modified T-cells experienced a complete remission of their non-Hodgkin lymphoma. And those pretreated with more aggressive chemotherapy did even better, researchers report. "It's a fantastic step forward," said Susanna Greer, director of clinical research and immunology at the American Cancer Society. "It's been difficult to make a lot of progress in lymphoma, especially in non-Hodgkin lymphoma, ... Read more

Related support groups: Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Follicular Lymphoma, Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma, Diagnosis and Investigation, Burkitt Lymphoma, Mantle Cell Lymphoma, Waldenström Macroglobulinemia, Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma, Mycosis Fungoides

Young Cancer Survivors Often Develop New Malignancies

Posted 6 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 – Teen and young adult cancer survivors are at increased risk for other cancers later in life, a new study reveals. Researchers analyzed U.S. National Cancer Institute data on people who survived cancers before age 40. They had the most common types of cancers in that age group: leukemia, lymphoma, testicular, ovarian, thyroid, breast, soft tissue and bone cancers. "This is a patient demographic that has been largely overlooked," said senior study author Dr. Robert Goldsby, a professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco Benioff Children's Hospital. Over 30 years, nearly 14 percent of the survivors were diagnosed with another, different type of cancer. On average, the second cancer occurred within 15 years. Compared to people in the general population, patients successfully treated for cancer between ages 15 and 39 were nearly 60 percent ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Hairy Cell Leukemia, Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Basal Cell Carcinoma, Lymphoma, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Ovarian Cancer, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Stomach Cancer, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma, Testicular Cancer, Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Burkitt Lymphoma

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methotrexate, Rituxan, rituximab, Revlimid, Imbruvica, Cytoxan, cyclophosphamide, Velcade, ibrutinib, view more... doxorubicin, vincristine, cytarabine, lenalidomide, Neosar, bortezomib, acalabrutinib, Cytoxan Lyophilized, mitoxantrone, Calquence