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Malaria Prevention News

Genetic Tweaks in Mosquitoes Might Curb Malaria Transmission

Posted 29 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 28, 2017 – Two new methods of genetic modification may reduce the risk of mosquitoes spreading the infectious disease malaria to people, researchers report. Malaria kills more than 400,000 people worldwide each year. It's a disease that's transmitted by mosquitoes to people. The majority of those who die from the disease are children aged 5 and under in sub-Saharan Africa. The first of the two new approaches came from a study team led by Marcelo Jacobs-Lorena. He's a professor at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. The researchers used a strain of bacteria that can spread rapidly in mosquitoes. The bacteria can also remain long-term in malaria-carrying mosquitoes. A genetically modified version of the bacteria inhibits development of the malaria parasite. That means the chances that the mosquitoes can transmit these parasites to people are ... Read more

Related support groups: Doxycycline, Plaquenil, Hydroxychloroquine, Malaria, Quinine, Malarone, Doryx, Malaria Prevention, Oracea, Mefloquine, Monodox, Chloroquine, Doxy Lemmon, Lariam, Insect Bites, Malaria Prophylaxis, Coartem, Doxy 100, Qualaquin, Artemether/Lumefantrine

Malaria Drug Protected Mouse Fetus From Zika: Study

Posted 11 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 11, 2017 – A malaria drug protected mice fetuses from the Zika virus, researchers report. In humans, Zika infection during pregnancy can cause severe brain damage in infants. In this study with pregnant mice, investigators found that the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine prevented Zika from crossing the placenta. "We found that the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine effectively blocks viral transmission to the fetus," said senior author Indira Mysorekar. She's an associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, and of pathology and immunology at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "This drug already is used in pregnant women to treat malaria, and we suggest that it warrants evaluation in primates and women to diminish the risks of Zika infection and disease in developing fetuses," Mysorekar said in a school news release. Even though hydroxychloroquine ... Read more

Related support groups: Plaquenil, Hydroxychloroquine, Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Malaria Prophylaxis, Zika Virus Infection, Quineprox, Plaquenil Sulfate

Travelers Bring Malaria Back to U.S., With High Costs

Posted 24 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 – Malaria sickens thousands of Americans and leads to millions of dollars in health care costs each year, a new study finds. Transmission of the mosquito-borne disease in the United States was stamped out decades ago. But it still affects Americans who travel to regions where it remains common, such as Africa, Asia and Latin America, and then bring it back home. Between 2000 and 2014, about 22,000 people were admitted to U.S. hospitals with complications of malaria, researchers found in their review of federal government data. Their findings were published April 24 in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. "It appears more and more Americans are traveling to areas where malaria is common and many of them are not taking preventive measures, such as using anti-malarial preventive medications and mosquito repellents, even though they are very ... Read more

Related support groups: Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Malaria Prophylaxis

New Clues to Huge Jump in U.S. Mosquito Population

Posted 6 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 6, 2016 – New research hints at why the number of mosquitoes has jumped 10-fold in the past 50 years in certain U.S. states: Increased urbanization and shrinking levels of the pesticide DDT in the environment could be major factors. "At first glance, recent increases in mosquito populations appear to be linked to rising temperatures from climate change, but careful analyses of data over the past century show that it's actually recovery from the effects of DDT," said study co-author Marm Kilpatrick. He is an associate professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Still, Kilpatrick said, climate change may be a factor going forward. "On the cold edge of a species' distribution, temperature matters a lot. In Washington, D.C., for example, where Aedes aegypti is not common now, it might become more common if the winters get ... Read more

Related support groups: Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Viral Infection, Hydrocephalus, West Nile Virus, Insect Bites, Malaria Prophylaxis, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital, Zika Virus Infection

Chickens Make Malaria Mosquitoes Fly the Coop

Posted 21 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 21, 2016 – Although a chicken may seem a strange choice for a bedfellow, sleeping with a poultry partner next to your bed could protect you from malaria, a new study suggests. Researchers found that one of the main mosquito species (Anopheles arabiensis) that transmits malaria in sub-Saharan Africa avoids chickens when looking for a meal of blood. The mosquitoes use their sense of smell to distinguish between chickens and animals they feed on. The discovery suggests that odors emitted by chickens and other animals mosquitoes don't like to feed on could help protect people from mosquito-borne diseases, the researchers said. The study was published July 20 in the Malaria Journal. "We were surprised to find that malaria mosquitoes are repelled by the odors emitted by chickens. This study shows for the first time that malaria mosquitoes actively avoid feeding on certain ... Read more

Related support groups: Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Insect Bites, Malaria Prophylaxis

Malaria Vaccine Protection Short-Lived in Young Children

Posted 1 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 30, 2016 – The world's most promising malaria vaccine appears to offer short-lived protection, fading away within a matter of years, a new clinical trial reveals. Even worse, the vaccine – dubbed RTS,S/AS01 – might increase children's long-term risk of contracting malaria if they live in a region with heavy transmission of the mosquito-borne parasite, the researchers found. The vaccine can "lead to a situation where unvaccinated children have more natural immunity than vaccinated children, and therefore get less malaria," said senior researcher Philip Bejon. He's director of the Kenya Medical Research Institute-Wellcome Trust Program in Kilifi, Kenya. The results indicate that RTS,S/AS01 could have limited usefulness in the global fight to eradicate malaria, said malaria expert Dr. Christopher Plowe, a professor of medicine with the University of Maryland School of ... Read more

Related support groups: Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Insect Bites, Malaria Prophylaxis, Diagnosis and Investigation, Vaccination and Prophlaxis

Malaria Vaccine Shows Promise in Small Study

Posted 10 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 10, 2016 – An experimental malaria vaccine protects a majority of adults against the mosquito-borne virus for up to one year, according to the results of a small study. The findings also showed those who were vaccinated couldn't spread the virus to others. "These results are really important," researcher Kirsten Lyke, from the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, said in a university news release. "Malaria has such a devastating effect on children, especially in Africa. This vaccine has the potential to help travelers, military personnel and children in malaria-endemic areas." Hundreds of millions of people are infected with malaria and more than 500,000 die from the virus each year, the researchers noted. Most fatal cases of malaria involve children under the age of 5, the study authors said. The first symptoms – which can include fever, headache, ... Read more

Related support groups: Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Malaria Prophylaxis, Vaccination and Prophlaxis

Zika Virus Was in Haiti Long Before Brazil Outbreak: Study

Posted 29 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 29, 2016 – New research suggests the Zika virus was circulating in Haiti months before Brazil's first cases were reported last spring. "We know that the virus was present in Haiti in December of 2014," said Dr. Glenn Morris, director of University of Florida's Emerging Pathogens Institute. "And, based on molecular studies, it may have been present in Haiti even before that date." What remains unclear is exactly why there was such a widespread outbreak in Brazil, the study authors said, and more research is needed to reveal why the same did not happen in Haiti. In Brazil, Zika infections have been linked to more than 5,000 cases of a birth defect known as microcephaly, in which babies are born with abnormally small heads and brains. To uncover Zika's presence in Haiti, the team of researchers analyzed three "mystery" infections reported in that country in 2014. The cases ... Read more

Related support groups: Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Hydrocephalus, Insect Bites, Diagnosis and Investigation, Malaria Prophylaxis, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital, Chikungunya Virus Infection, Zika Virus Infection

Life-Saving Health Care in Poor Nations Would Cost $5 Per Person: Study

Posted 10 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, April 10, 2016 – The cost of health care that could save the lives of millions of children and their mothers every year would be less than $5 per person, researchers report. The money would expand basic health services – such as birth control, nutritional supplements and medication to treat serious illnesses such as pneumonia and malaria – in 74 low- and middle-income countries. Those countries account for more than 95 percent of mother and child deaths each year, according to the study published April 9 in The Lancet. The researchers reported that, worldwide, in 2015 nearly 6 million children under age 5 died, as did more than 300,000 women from pregnancy-related causes. "Many of these deaths could be prevented if high-impact and affordable solutions reached the populations that needed them most," study leader Dr. Robert Black said in a John Hopkins University news release. ... Read more

Related support groups: Pneumonia, Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Malaria Prophylaxis

Combo Treatment Protects Pregnant Women, Fetuses From Malaria in Study

Posted 10 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 9, 2016 – A combination drug therapy widely used to treat malaria in adults also protects pregnant women and their fetuses from the disease, according to a new study. Malaria is a leading cause of premature birth, low birth weight and death among infants in Africa, the researchers said. Most Africans develop immunity to malaria by adulthood, but women lose some of this immunity during pregnancy and are given drugs to prevent infection. The recommended preventive drug is sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), but the mosquito-transmitted parasite that causes malaria is often resistant to it. Researchers assessed whether the combination therapy dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) – commonly used to treat malaria in adults – could prevent malaria in pregnant women. The study included 300 pregnant women in Uganda. Beginning in the 16th week of pregnancy, about one-third of the ... Read more

Related support groups: Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Malaria Prophylaxis, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Sulfadoxine, Daraprim, Pyrimethamine/Sulfadoxine, Fansidar, Pyrimethamine

Preventable Ills Cause Nearly 8 Million Childhood Deaths Globally

Posted 25 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 25, 2016 – Most of the nearly 8 million deaths of children and teens around the world in 2013 were avoidable, a new report says. More than 6 million children younger than 5 lost their lives because of treatable conditions like malaria, diarrhea and respiratory tract infections, according to pediatric researchers who've analyzed results of the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. "The vast majority of deaths in children and adolescents are preventable," said the authors from the Global Burden of Disease Pediatrics Collaboration. "Proven interventions exist to prevent diarrheal and respiratory diseases, neonatal conditions, iron deficiency anemia and road injuries, which result in some of the highest burdens of unnecessary death and disability among children and adolescents." For the study, the researchers from around the world used data from a variety of sources to target ... Read more

Related support groups: Diarrhea, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Malaria, Diarrhea, Chronic, Malaria Prevention, Diarrhea, Acute, Malaria Prophylaxis, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Infectious Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Pediatricians' Group Urges Action on Climate Change

Posted 26 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 – Dirtier air, heat stress, greater exposure to Lyme disease – these and other threats to children will increase because of climate change, a leading group of U.S. pediatricians warns. Doctors and policy makers must take steps to protect youngsters from the hazardous effects of climate change, the American Academy of Pediatrics said in a new policy statement. "Every child needs a safe and healthy environment and climate change is a rising public health threat to all children in this country and around the world," academy president Dr. Sandra Hassink said in a news release from the organization. The threats to children also include natural disasters, more infectious diseases and problems with food and water supplies, the academy said. "Pediatricians have a unique and powerful voice in this conversation due to their knowledge of child health and disease, and their ... Read more

Related support groups: Lyme Disease, Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Malaria Prophylaxis, Heat Stress

Ebola Linked to Rise in Malaria Deaths in Guinea

Posted 24 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 24, 2015 – The Ebola epidemic in West Africa appears to have led to an increase in malaria deaths last year, a new study finds. Research in Guinea, one of the countries hardest hit by the Ebola epidemic, indicates an extra 74,000 cases of malaria went untreated in 2014, compared to previous years. As a result, deaths associated with malaria (a mosquito-borne disease) also rose and will likely exceed Ebola deaths in Guinea, researchers reported June 23 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. "One problem is that the early symptoms of malaria [fever, headache and body aches] mimic those of Ebola virus disease," said study author Dr. Mateusz Plucinski, from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Malaria is one of the main causes of fever and health facilities visits in Guinea, but our data suggest that since the start of the Ebola epidemic, people with fevers ... Read more

Related support groups: Doxycycline, Plaquenil, Hydroxychloroquine, Malaria, Quinine, Malarone, Doryx, Malaria Prevention, Oracea, Mefloquine, Monodox, Chloroquine, Doxy Lemmon, Lariam, Malaria Prophylaxis, Coartem, Doxy 100, Qualaquin, Vibramycin, Artemether/Lumefantrine

Ebola Outbreak May Have Led to Almost 11,000 Additional Malaria Deaths: Study

Posted 23 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 23, 2015 – Nearly 11,000 extra deaths due to malaria may have occurred in 2014 because of disruptions in health care services caused by the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, a new study suggests. Another 3,900 extra malaria deaths may have been caused by the interruption of delivery of insecticide-treated sleeping nets, the British researchers said. The study appears online April 23 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. "The ongoing Ebola epidemic in parts of West Africa largely overwhelmed already fragile health care systems in 2014, making adequate care for malaria impossible and threatening to jeopardize progress made in malaria control and elimination over the past decade," study author Patrick Walker, of the MRC Centre for Outbreak Analysis and Modelling at Imperial College London, said in a journal news release. The findings suggest that the number of malaria deaths ... Read more

Related support groups: Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Malaria Prophylaxis, Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever

Malaria Vaccine Shows Promise in Shielding African Children

Posted 23 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 23, 2015 – According to the World Health Organization, about 584,000 people, mostly in Africa, die from mosquito-borne malaria each year. Most of those victims are children, but the success of a new malaria vaccine in late-stage trials could offer real hope against the disease, experts say. There is currently no vaccine for malaria, and the new vaccine, called RTS,S/AS01, was developed for use in sub-Saharan Africa, where malaria kills about 1,300 children every day. The phase 3 trial of the vaccine included more than 15,400 newborns (ages 6 to 12 weeks at first vaccination) and children (5 to 17 months at first vaccination) at 11 sites in seven sub-Saharan African countries. A team led by Brian Greenwood, of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, reported that the vaccine protected the children more than the newborns, but protection weakened over time in ... Read more

Related support groups: Malaria, Malaria Prevention, Malaria Prophylaxis, Vaccination and Prophlaxis

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