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Related terms: Cancer, Lymphoma

Worldwide Cancer Rates Up More Than One-Third in Past Decade: Report

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Dec. 3, 2016 – Cancer cases rose 33 percent worldwide in the past 10 years, a new study shows. In 2015, there were 17.5 million diagnoses and 8.7 million deaths in the world from the disease, the researchers found. The rise in cancer cases was mainly due to population aging and growth, along with changes in age-specific cancer rates, according to the Global Burden of Disease Cancer Collaboration study. The lifetime risk of developing cancer was one in three for men and one in four for women, the researchers said. Prostate cancer was the most common type of cancer in men (1.6 million cases), and tracheal, bronchus and lung cancer was the leading cause of cancer death in men. Breast cancer was the most common cancer for women (2.4 million cases), and the leading cause of cancer death in women. The most common cancers in children were leukemia, other neoplasms, non-Hodgkin ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Lymphoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Testicular Cancer, Salivary Gland Cancer, Solid Tumors

DNA Sequencing May Lead to Personalized Cancer Treatment

Posted 9 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 9, 2016 – DNA sequencing may help personalize treatment for people with lymphoma, a new study suggests. By analyzing small bits of DNA in the blood, researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine said they could determine the cancer's subtype. They said they could also identify mutations that might make treatment less effective or worsen a patient's prognosis. The study authors said their findings add to growing evidence that noninvasive, blood-based biopsies may help detect cancer earlier by tracking its evolution. They said this test may also significantly change how the disease is treated. "Now we can identify the subtype of the tumor, watch how it changes over time and begin to tailor our chemotherapy choices based on the presence or absence of specific mutations," said study co-senior author Dr. Ash Alizadeh, an assistant professor of medicine/oncology. ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma, Follicular Lymphoma, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Diagnosis and Investigation, Burkitt Lymphoma, Mantle Cell Lymphoma, Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma, Conjunctival Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma

Stem Cell Transplant Can Help HIV Patients Battling Lymphoma: Study

Posted 15 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 – People living with HIV are at high risk for lymphoma, and a new study concludes that stem cell transplant should be standard treatment in these cases. The transplants should be "autologous" – meaning the cells come from the patients themselves, the researchers said. The new findings could challenge the widely held belief that HIV-positive patients are not candidates for this therapy. Instead, the study found that "overall survival for patients with HIV infection after transplant is comparable to that seen in people who were not HIV-infected," said study lead author Dr. Joseph Alvarnas. As his team explained, people with HIV are at increased risk for cancer, even if their infection is well-controlled with antiretroviral drugs. In fact, cancer is now a leading cause of death among HIV patients. The risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, specifically in HIV-positive ... Read more

Related support groups: HIV Infection, Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Radon in the Home May Be Linked to Blood Cancers in Women

Posted 3 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 – New research suggests a strong link between exposure to high levels of radon in the home and women's risk of blood cancers. Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says. It's known to cause lung cancer and is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States, the researchers said. The American Cancer Society collected information over 19 years on more than 140,000 Americans as part of a prevention study. During that time, just over 3,000 cases of blood cancer were diagnosed. The cancers included leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma, the study found. Women who lived in counties with the highest radon levels were 63 percent more likely to develop blood cancers than those in counties with the lowest radon levels. There was no link seen among men, the study noted. The study was published online recently in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Leukemia, Lung Cancer, Lymphoma, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Multiple Myeloma, Poisoning, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse

Male Childhood Cancer Survivors Less Likely to Have Kids, Study Finds

Posted 24 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 24, 2016 – Men who survived cancer when they were children, teens or young adults seem to be less likely to have children of their own than men who never had cancer, a new study reveals. The likelihood of having children was especially low among those who survived testicular cancer, bone cancer, brain tumors, lymphoma and leukemia, researchers at the University of Bergen in Norway found. The findings "are important for male cancer survivors, seeing as we can identify groups at risk of having reproduction problems," study author Maria Winther Gunnes, a Ph.D. candidate in the department of global public health and primary care, said in a university news release. For the study, researchers reviewed data from all Norwegian men born between 1965 and 1985. Male cancer survivors were three times more likely to use assisted fertilization than those who never had cancer, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Female Infertility, Leukemia, Lymphoma, Brain Tumor, Oligospermia, Testicular Cancer

Could IVF Raise Children's Odds for Blood Cancer?

Posted 4 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 4, 2016 – Children conceived through in vitro fertilization (IVF) might have a slightly increased risk of developing blood cancer, a new study suggests. Children born via IVF had a 67 percent increased risk of leukemia and a more than tripled risk of Hodgkin's lymphoma compared to children conceived naturally, researchers found in an analysis of more than 1.6 million children in Norway. Parents shouldn't panic, however. The risk of childhood cancer is still very small, even after factoring in the results of this study, said lead author Dr. Marte Myhre Reigstad. She is a researcher with the Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Women's Health at Oslo University Hospital. "For example, in Norway, the risk of being diagnosed with leukemia within the first 10 years of life is 0.5 in 1,000," Reigstad said. "A risk increase of such magnitude as found in our study would amount to ... Read more

Related support groups: Female Infertility, Leukemia, Lymphoma, Ovulation Induction, Primary Ovarian Failure, Follicle Stimulation

Lymphoma Survivors May Not Get All Recommended Follow-Up Care

Posted 15 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2016 – Some teen and young adult survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma do not receive all the recommended follow-up care, a new study finds. The study included 354 survivors in California who were diagnosed between ages 15 and 39, and followed for an average of six years. Within the first year, 52 percent of the survivors did not receive all recommended care outlined in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. But within five years after completing treatment, 96 percent of the survivors had recommended visits (at least one a year) with an oncologist and 70 percent had recommended laboratory testing, according the study authors. The study is scheduled for presentation Friday at an American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in San Francisco. The findings should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal. Hodgkin lymphoma, a cancer ... Read more

Related support groups: Lymphoma, Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Young Cancer Survivors Often Develop New Malignancies

Posted 6 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 6, 2015 – Teen and young adult cancer survivors are at increased risk for other cancers later in life, a new study reveals. Researchers analyzed U.S. National Cancer Institute data on people who survived cancers before age 40. They had the most common types of cancers in that age group: leukemia, lymphoma, testicular, ovarian, thyroid, breast, soft tissue and bone cancers. "This is a patient demographic that has been largely overlooked," said senior study author Dr. Robert Goldsby, a professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco Benioff Children's Hospital. Over 30 years, nearly 14 percent of the survivors were diagnosed with another, different type of cancer. On average, the second cancer occurred within 15 years. Compared to people in the general population, patients successfully treated for cancer between ages 15 and 39 were nearly 60 percent ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Hairy Cell Leukemia, Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Lymphoma, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Ovarian Cancer, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Stomach Cancer, Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Burkitt Lymphoma, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

Kids Born to Older Dads May Face Risk of Blood Cancers

Posted 12 May 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 – Adults who were born to older fathers may be at increased risk for blood and immune system cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma, a new study suggests. This association is particularly strong among only children, the American Cancer Society investigators added. However, the study did not prove there was a cause-and-effect link between the two. There was no association between having an older mother and increased risk of these cancers, according to the study published online May 11 in the American Journal of Epidemiology. "The lifetime risk of these cancers is fairly low – about one in 20 men and women will be diagnosed with lymphoma, leukemia or myeloma at some point during their lifetime – so people born to older fathers should not be alarmed," study leader Lauren Teras said in a journal news release. "Still, the study does highlight the need for more ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma

Screening Test Approved for Viruses That Cause Blood Cancer

Posted 11 Dec 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 11, 2014 – A new screening test to detect Human T-Cell Lymphotropic viruses that cause a rare blood cancer has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The viruses, abbreviated HTLV-I/II, cause diseases such as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (blood cancer) and myelopathy (inflammation of spinal cord nerves) , the FDA said in a news release. HTLV can be transmitted via breastfeeding, unprotected sex or blood transfusion. The newly approved test – MP Diagnostics HTLV Blot 2.4 – is meant to supplement existing screening for the viruses, the FDA said. The diagnostic also can differentiate between the two types, HTLV-I or HTLV-II. Many people infected with HTLV may not be aware of its presence, since the virus does not always trigger symptoms. An infected person can transmit the virus without showing any signs or symptoms, the agency said. The new test is ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Lymphoma, Diagnosis and Investigation

Mutations Linked to Blood Cancers Rise With Age, Study Shows

Posted 22 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 – Blood cell mutations linked to the blood cancers leukemia and lymphoma increase as people get older, according to a new study. Researchers analyzed blood samples from nearly 3,000 Americans, ages 10 to 90, and found the mutations in less than 1 percent of those ages 40 to 49. By the time people are between 70 and 79, 5 percent will have blood cell mutations, according to the study. For people between 80 and 89, more than 6 percent will be affected, the researchers found. Cell mutations accumulate as people age, and most are harmless, according to the researchers. They said that having these blood cell mutations associated with leukemia and lymphoma doesn't mean a person will develop these blood cancers. In fact, the diseases occur in less than 0.1 percent of elderly Americans, the researchers noted. "But it's quite striking how many people over age 70 have ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Lymphoma

Lymphoma Treatment May Harm, Halt Men's Sperm Production

Posted 26 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 25, 2014 (HealthDay – Treatment for lymphoma may lower men's fertility, new research indicates. Both Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which are cancers of the body's white blood cells, often affect young people who are still in their reproductive years. For men, treatment for these cancers can harm or halt sperm production. Although most men regain their fertility within two years of treatment, the researchers cautioned that men should be counseled about the possibility of this significant side effect before treatment begins. "While many men can look forward to their fertility returning after treatment is over, not all will be so fortunate," Dr. Rebecca Sokol, president of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, said in a society news release. "It is imperative that prior to the initiation of therapy, counseling and sperm preservation be made available to ... Read more

Related support groups: Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Hodgkin's Lymphoma

FDA Approves Zydelig (idelalisib) for CLL and Lymphoma

Posted 23 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

July 23, 2014 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Zydelig (idelalisib) to treat patients with three types of blood cancers. Zydelig is being granted traditional approval to treat patients whose chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has returned (relapsed). Used in combination with Rituxan (rituximab), Zydelig is to be used in patients for whom Rituxan alone would be considered appropriate therapy due to other existing medical conditions (co-morbidities). Zydelig is the fifth new drug with breakthrough therapy designation to be approved by the FDA and the third drug with this designation approved to treat CLL. The FDA is also granting Zydelig accelerated approval to treat patients with relapsed follicular B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (FL) and relapsed small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), another type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Zydelig is intended to be used in patients who ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Follicular Lymphoma

Zydelig Approved for Three Types of Blood Cancer

Posted 23 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 23, 2014 – Zydelig (idelalisib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat relapsed forms of blood cancer, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), follicular B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (FL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), the FDA said Wednesday in a news release. The approval for the three forms of blood cancer covers instances when the cancer returns despite treatment with at least one other therapy, the agency said. The drug's label will include a boxed warning that the medication could cause liver toxicity, diarrhea, high blood sugar, elevated liver enzymes, high blood triglycerides [a blood fat] and inflammation of the colon (colitis). Other side effects noted during clinical testing included fever, fatigue, nausea, cough, pneumonia, abdominal pain, chills and rash. Zydelig is marketed by Gilead Sciences, based in Foster City, ... Read more

Related support groups: Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL), Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Follicular Lymphoma

FDA Approves Beleodaq (belinostat) for Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

Posted 3 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

July 3, 2014 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Beleodaq (belinostat) for the treatment of patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), a rare and fast-growing type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The action was taken under the agency’s accelerated approval program. PTCL comprises a diverse group of rare diseases in which lymph nodes become cancerous. In 2014, the National Cancer Institute estimates that 70,800 Americans will be diagnosed with NHL and 18,990 will die. PTCL represents about 10 to 15 percent of NHLs in North America. Beleodaq works by stopping enzymes that contribute to T-cells, a type of immune cell, becoming cancerous. It is intended for patients whose disease returned after treatment (relapsed) or did not respond to previous treatment (refractory). “This is the third drug that has been approved since 2009 for the treatment of peripheral T-c ... Read more

Related support groups: Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma

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