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Related terms: Cancer, Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Cancer, Lung

Pollution Tied to 9 Million Deaths Worldwide in 2015

Posted 2 days 12 hours ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 20, 2017 – Pollution led to more than 9 million deaths worldwide in 2015, or 1 in 6 deaths that year, a new report reveals. Air pollution, the worst culprit, was linked to 6.5 million heart- and lung-related deaths, The Lancet Commission on Pollution and Health said. Water pollution was tied to 1.8 million deaths, mostly from gastrointestinal and parasitic infections. And workplace-related pollution and lead pollution also played a role, contributing to 800,000 deaths and 500,000 deaths, respectively. "Pollution is much more than an environmental challenge – it is a profound and pervasive threat that affects many aspects of human health and well-being," said Dr. Philip Landrigan, co-lead of the commission. "It deserves the full attention of international leaders, civil society, health professionals, and people around the world," added Landrigan, a professor at the Icahn ... Read more

Related support groups: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Bronchitis, Lung Cancer, Fluticasone, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Ribavirin, Qvar, Budesonide, Flovent, Entocort, Tobramycin, Mometasone, Entocort EC, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Bronchiectasis, Beclomethasone

How to Talk to Someone With Cancer

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 12, 2017 – For people diagnosed with cancer, communication with family members plays a vital role in their health and well-being, according to an expert from San Diego State University. After studying this issue for a decade, communications professor Wayne Beach concluded that cancer patients benefit from continuous positive dialogue. "Cancer patients do cope and heal better depending on their communication within their families," Beach said in a university news release. "Without this proper communication, these patients don't heal as well or as long. Having a dysfunctional environment around you is not good – it's stressful." Patients and their loved ones cope better, he found, when they share stories, reminisce and talk about their hopes as well as their concerns. "How family members communicate when coping [with a diagnosis] is important," Beach said. "Patients have ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Stomach Cancer, Testicular Cancer

More Hardcore Smokers Trying to Kick the Habit

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 11, 2017 – More "hardcore" smokers than ever are trying to extinguish their bad habit, new research suggests. "Even though they smoke more than the general population, smokers with high psychological distress have been smoking less and trying to quit more, as the overall level of smoking has decreased," said study author Margarete Kulik. She's a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, San Francisco's Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education. "This shows that with effective tobacco control policies, even hardcore smokers will soften over time," Kulik said in a UCSF news release. For the study, researchers analyzed health data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Almost 120,000 smokers were asked about their daily cigarette habit and any attempts to quit smoking for at least one day over the past 12 months. The survey also included information collected on ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Nicotine, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Nicorette, Nicoderm CQ, Nicotrol Inhaler, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Commit, Habitrol, Nicotrol TD, Nicorelief, Nicorette DS, Nicotrol NS, ProStep

Health Tip: Screening for Lung Cancer

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Lung cancer is one of the deadliest forms of cancer, and often lacks symptoms in its earliest stages. That's what makes lung cancer screening so important, the American Lung Association says. The organization provides this additional information: Screening can help find lung cancer at an early stage when it is easier to treat. A low (radiation) dose CT scan may reduce your chances of dying from lung cancer. This imaging process takes a series of pictures as you lie on a table that slides in and out of a scanning machine. Lung cancer screening is not suitable for everyone, but may be recommended for those at high risk for developing the disease. Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Bronchogenic Carcinoma

Switch From Smoking to Vaping Could Save Over 6 Million U.S. Lives

Posted 3 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 2, 2017 – Millions of cigarette smokers could live substantially longer if electronic cigarettes are embraced as a replacement for tobacco during the next decade, a new study contends. As many as 6.6 million cigarette smokers could live a combined 86.7 million more years under policies that encourage them to swap their smokes for e-cigarettes, according to "optimistic" projections from cancer researchers at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. Even a worst-case scenario involving e-cigarettes would still save lives, the researchers said. Under a "pessimistic" projection, 1.6 million former cigarette smokers would have a combined 20.8 million more years of additional life, the research team found. These numbers show that adopting e-cigarettes as an alternative to smoking could prove the easiest way to cause tobacco use to dwindle in the United States, said lead ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Nicotine, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Nicorette, Nicoderm CQ, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Nicotrol Inhaler, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Commit, Respiratory Tract Disease, Habitrol, Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Nicotrol TD, Nicorelief, Nicorette DS

Fewer Uninsured Cancer Patients After Medicaid Expansion

Posted 27 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 27, 2017 – States that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act halved the number of uninsured cancer patients, a new U.S. study finds. This matters because "uninsured cancer patients are more likely to go without needed care and treatment, such as radiation therapy or surgery to remove tumors," said study lead author Dr. Fumiko Chino. She is a radiation oncology resident at the Duke University School of Medicine. Chino and her colleagues analyzed the records of more than 197,000 cancer patients ages 18 to 64. All were newly diagnosed with cancer between 2011 and 2014 and received radiation as part of their treatment. The percentage of uninsured patients fell 52 percent on average in states that expanded Medicaid, while Medicaid enrollment rose from 15 to 18 percent. Medicaid is the publicly funded insurance program for the poor. In states that did not expand ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Brain Tumor, Skin Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Testicular Cancer, Solid Tumors

Radiation and Chemotherapy Together Boost Lung Cancer Survival

Posted 27 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 26, 2017 – Combining radiation therapy with chemotherapy has substantially extended survival for many people with lung cancer, two new studies report. About 32 percent of non-small cell lung cancer patients who received chemoradiation therapy were still alive five years following treatment, a survival rate double that of previous estimates, according to results from a long-term clinical trial. Further, a small second clinical trial of people with lung cancer that had already spread to other parts of the body showed that radiation therapy added to chemo dramatically slowed the time until these cancers progressed further. The two studies show that radiation therapy and chemotherapy work well together, and that radiation also might help patients who are undergoing newer forms of cancer treatment like targeted therapy and immunotherapy, said Dr. Benjamin Movsas, a radiation ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, History - Radiation Therapy, Bronchogenic Carcinoma

Blacks, Elderly Missing From U.S. Cancer Clinical Trials

Posted 26 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 25, 2017 – Four out of five participants in cancer clinical trials are white, a discrepancy that calls into question whether other races and ethnicities are receiving good cancer treatment, researchers say. Women and the elderly also are underrepresented in clinical trials, according to the new findings. Prior studies have shown that the effectiveness of cancer treatment can vary based on a person's race, gender and age, said lead researcher Dr. Narjust Duma. Despite this, clinical trials have failed to successfully recruit a diverse patient population upon whom to test new drugs and therapies, said Duma, a hematology/oncology fellow at the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn. "All the data we're using to guide cancer treatment is for one type of patient," she said. Duma undertook this study after a conversation with a black lung cancer patient about possible chemotherapy ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Lung Cancer, Melanoma, Diagnosis and Investigation

Cancer Distress May Lead to Missed Appointments

Posted 25 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 25, 2017 – Seriously distressed cancer patients appear to miss more appointments and have more hospital admissions during treatment, a new study finds. The U.S. National Comprehensive Cancer Network describes severe distress as "a mix of anxiety and depressive symptoms." About one-third of cancer patients have significant distress, it says. "We know that having cancer is stressful, which means that we have a responsibility to consider a patient's mental well-being when planning a course of action with them," said study author Justin Anderson. "Focusing on the 'whole patient' allows oncologists to deliver the best possible treatment," added Anderson, a medical student at the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine. The study included 54 patients aged 32 to 85 undergoing radiation therapy. Fifteen percent reported severe distress; 29 percent described moderate ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Cancer, Breast Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer

Where It's Legal, One-Quarter of Cancer Patients Use Medical Pot

Posted 25 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 25, 2017 – If you legalize medical marijuana, a sizable number of cancer patients will sign up, a new Washington state survey suggests. One-quarter of cancer patients in Washington use marijuana, researchers found. But the study also revealed it can be a challenge to get information about the drug from health care providers. "Cancer patients desire but are not receiving information from their cancer doctors about marijuana use during their treatment, so many of them are seeking information from alternate nonscientific sources," said study author Dr. Steven Pergam of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. Marijuana is reported to ease symptoms related to cancer treatment, and U.S. cancer patients will have greater access to medical pot as acceptance and availability of marijuana increases nationwide, Pergam's team said. Currently, recreational marijuana is ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Cannabis, Cervical Cancer

Survey: 9 of 10 Americans Take Cancer Prevention Steps

Posted 22 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 22, 2017 – About 95 percent of Americans take some action to prevent cancer, according to a new survey. Three-quarters of respondents said they don't smoke; 74 percent limit their alcohol consumption; 72 percent stick to a healthy diet; and 90 percent are aware of their family's cancer history, the survey found. Women are far more likely than men to take all three preventive steps and more – discussing risk and prevention with their health care provider, getting the recommended amount of sleep, and undergoing recommended cancer screenings. The fourth edition of the Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup also reported that 62 percent said they or a loved one had been diagnosed with cancer. Sixty-one percent are concerned that they will develop cancer during their lifetime. Despite the concern, many respondents have an optimistic attitude: 78 percent expect a cure for cancer ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Smoking, Breast Cancer, Smoking Cessation, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer

HIV and Smoking a Lethal Combo for the Lungs

Posted 18 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 – HIV patients who take their medication but also smoke are about 10 times more likely to die from lung cancer than from AIDS-related causes, a new study estimates. Lifesaving antiretroviral drugs have improved life expectancy to the point that patients now have more to fear from tobacco than HIV, said lead researcher Dr. Krishna Reddy. "Thanks to antiretroviral medicines, people with HIV are living longer," said Reddy, a pulmonologist and critical care doctor with Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. "The bad news is that they're living long enough to get cancer." Based on the new findings, smoking cessation should be a focus of treatment, he and his colleagues said. More than 40 percent of people with HIV are smokers, a rate more than double that of the general population, Reddy said. Fatalism and depression among HIV patients often lead them to take up ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, HIV Infection, Smoking Cessation, Nicotine, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, Nicorette, Nicoderm CQ, Nicotrol Inhaler, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Commit, Habitrol, Nicotrol TD, Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Nicorelief, Nicorette DS, Nicotrol NS, ProStep

FDA Approves Mvasi (bevacizumab-awwb), a Biosimilar to Avastin

Posted 17 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

September 14, 2017 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Mvasi (bevacizumab-awwb) as a biosimilar to Avastin (bevacizumab) for the treatment of multiple types of cancer. Mvasi is the first biosimilar approved in the U.S. for the treatment of cancer. “Bringing new biosimilars to patients, especially for diseases where the cost of existing treatments can be high, is an important way to help spur competition that can lower healthcare costs and increase access to important therapies,” said FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. “We’ll continue to work hard to ensure that biosimilar medications are brought to the market quickly, through a process that makes certain that these new medicines meet the FDA’s rigorous gold standard for safety and effectiveness.” Mvasi is approved for the treatment of adult patients with certain colorectal, lung, brain, kidney and cervical cancers ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Lung Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Avastin, Cervical Cancer, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Bevacizumab, Mvasi

Mvasi Is First Biosimilar Drug Approved for Cancer

Posted 14 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 14, 2017 – The first biosimilar drug to treat cancer has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Mvasi (bevacizumab-awwb) was found to be biosimilar to the anti-cancer drug Avastin, the FDA said Thursday in a news release. Avastin was approved in 2004. Biosimilar drugs are typically derived from living organisms and are approved after manufacturers demonstrate that the medications are "highly similar" to already approved drugs, the agency said. Mvasi is approved to treat certain cancers of the colon, lung, brain, kidney and cervix, the FDA said. "Bringing new biosimilars to patients, especially for diseases where the cost of existing treatments can be high, is an important way to help spur competition that can lower healthcare costs and increase access to important therapies," said FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb. He pledged new biosimilar drugs ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Avastin, Cervical Cancer, Bevacizumab, Mvasi

FDA OKs First 'Biosimilar' Drug to Fight Cancer

Posted 14 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 14, 2017 – The first approval of a biosimilar drug to treat cancer was announced Thursday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Mvasi (bevacizumab-awwb) was approved as a biosimilar to Avastin (bevacizumab) for the treatment of adults with certain colon, lung, brain, kidney and cervical cancers. A biosimilar is a biological product that is approved because it is highly similar to an already-approved biologic drug and has no significant differences in safety and effectiveness from the first product, the FDA explained. "Bringing new biosimilars to patients, especially for diseases where the cost of existing treatments can be high, is an important way to help spur competition that can lower health care costs and increase access to important therapies," FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said in an agency news release. Mvasi is marketed by Amgen, Inc., headquartered in ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Lung Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Colorectal Cancer, Brain Tumor, Avastin, Cervical Cancer, Bevacizumab, Mvasi

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