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Related terms: Cancer, Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Cancer, Lung

Health Tip: Want Healthier Lungs?

Posted 12 hours ago by Drugs.com

-- Though you can't live without them, we'll bet you haven't spent much time thinking about how to take care of your lungs. The American Lung Association has these suggestions: Don't start smoking; if you are a smoker, quit. Don't allow smoking in your home or car. Test your home for radon. Avoid the outdoors when air quality is poor. Prevent lung infections by washing your hands frequently, getting any recommended vaccines, and avoiding people who are sick. Exercise regularly to keep your lungs strong and healthy. See your health care provider regularly. Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Smoking, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Smoking Cessation, Dyspnea, Lung Cancer, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Respiratory Tract Disease

Big Gap in Cancer Deaths Between Rich, Poor Countries

Posted 1 day 9 hours ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 21, 2017 – Over the past few decades, death rates linked to cancer and heart disease have declined in most developed nations, thanks to more effective prevention strategies, early detection and greater access to quality health care. But the same isn't true for poorer counties where the number of people dying from cancer has either remained unchanged or continues to rise, researchers report. The international team of researchers assessed the impact that cancer has had on the life span of people between 40 and 84 years old from 1981 to 2010, and compared it to the effects that heart disease has had on life expectancy over the same time period. The scientists analyzed cancer death rates from national databases of 52 countries that belong to the World Health Organization. They considered deaths for all cancers combined, and also looked specifically at the deaths rates for ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Gastric Cancer

Raise the Smoking Age to 21? Most Kids Fine With That

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 19, 2017 – Nearly two-thirds of U.S. teens support raising the minimum age for purchasing tobacco products to 21 years old, new research finds. Specifically, kids from 11 to 18 were asked if they supported the Tobacco 21 initiative – a program through the Preventing Tobacco Addiction Foundation that strives to raise the minimum age for tobacco purchases. "Current studies have focused on the attitudes of adults, and little is known about how youth nationwide perceive the Tobacco 21 initiative as well as the correlations between these attitudes and smoking behaviors," said study author Hongying Dai. She's an associate professor in the Health Services and Outcomes Research Department at Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Mo. The reasons for increasing the age to 21 are largely scientific. Kids are at the greatest risk of becoming smokers, and smokers almost always ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Nicotine, Lung Cancer, Nicorette, Nicoderm CQ, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Nicotrol Inhaler, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Commit, Habitrol, Nicorelief, Nicorette DS, Nicotrol NS, ProStep, Nicotrol TD

Publicly Funded Cancer Trials Gained Americans 3 Million More Years

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 6, 2017 – Public-funded trials have significantly extended the lives of people diagnosed with cancer, according to new research. SWOG, the clinical trials network funded by the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI), has involved more than 200,000 patient volunteers. These trials have led to approval of 14 new cancer drugs and more than 100 changes to cancer care standards. All told, the clinical trials studied extended life by 3.34 million years, the study found. SWOG estimates the dollar return on investment from federal funding at $125 for each year of life gained. "A lot of people with cancer have lived longer because of the therapies tested in our publicly funded trials," study leader Joseph Unger said in a SWOG news release. He is an assistant member of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center's Cancer Prevention Program in Seattle. "At the same time, the cost of ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Depo-Provera, Provera, Methotrexate, Breast Cancer, Accutane, Lupron, Prostate Cancer, Medroxyprogesterone, Tamoxifen, Arimidex, Fluorouracil, Tretinoin, Lupron Depot, Femara, Lung Cancer, Gleevec, Colorectal Cancer, Rituxan, Isotretinoin

Can Drug Company Perks Sway Cancer Docs' Prescriptions?

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 6, 2017 – Cancer doctors who receive freebies from pharmaceutical companies are more likely to prescribe drugs produced by those companies, a new study reports. Free meals, paid travel expenses and fees for consulting or lecturing appeared to influence which drugs a doctor would choose when treating two different types of cancer, said study lead researcher Dr. Aaron Mitchell. Specifically, doctors were 78 percent more likely to prescribe a drug to treat kidney cancer that had spread if they'd received a gift or small payment from that drug's manufacturer, compared to physicians who didn't receive any payments, Mitchell said. The doctors also were 29 percent more likely to prescribe a drug for chronic myeloid leukemia if they'd received meals, travel or speaking fees from the drug's maker, Mitchell said. "This raises the possibility that drug companies are able to ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer

Gene-Targeted Drugs Fight Advanced Lung Cancers

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 5, 2017 – Two drugs that target genetic flaws are giving people with specific types of advanced lung cancer a chance to live longer and better, a pair of new clinical trials finds. A newly approved drug called alectinib (Alecensa) works twice as long as the current standard medication in halting cancer growth in patients with ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer, results from a new global clinical trial show. ALK is a gene that produces a protein that helps cancer cells grow and spread, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). In another study, an experimental drug called dacomitinib delayed cancer growth by about half in non-small cell lung cancer patients who had a mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) that caused cancer cells to grow faster, a second trial reported. Non-small cell lung cancers comprise most lung cancer cases. EGFR is a ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Xalkori, Iressa, Crizotinib, Gefitinib, Alecensa, Alectinib

Reporting Symptoms Online to Docs Helps Cancer Patients Live Longer

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, June 4, 2017 – When people with advanced cancer report their symptoms to health care providers using an online program, they may live longer, a new study suggests. The benefit may come because the new online tool cuts any "lag time" between patients experiencing symptoms and their care team's response to those issues, the researchers said. "Patients receiving chemotherapy often have severe symptoms, but doctors and nurses are unaware of these symptoms up to half of the time," explained study author Dr. Ethan Basch, a professor of medicine at the University of North Carolina's Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Bruce Johnston, President-Elect of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), said the new technology addresses a common problem in cancer care. "A lot of patients are reluctant to contact docs between visits – they may think, 'I don't feel too good, but ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer

Experimental Gene-Targeted Drug Hits Cancer Where It Lives

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, June 3, 2017 – An experimental drug that targets a specific gene mutation can battle a range of advanced cancers in adults and children, researchers are reporting. The genetic abnormality is known as a TRK fusion, and it's found in only a small percentage of all cancers. So the drug, called larotrectinib, is no panacea. But researchers found that among 50 patients with TRK fusions, 76 percent saw their cancer regress after starting larotrectinib – regardless of their age or type of cancer. For most of those patients – 79 percent – the response has lasted at least one year, according to lead researcher Dr. David Hyman. "There are few therapies that have had that kind of success for patients like these," said Hyman, an oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. Dr. William Oh, an oncologist who was not involved in the study, agreed. "A 76 percent ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Keytruda, Head and Neck Cancer, Pembrolizumab, Salivary Gland Cancer

Suicide Risk Quadruples After Lung Cancer Diagnosis

Posted 23 May 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 23, 2017 – People with lung cancer have a strikingly higher-than-normal risk of suicide, a new study finds. While a cancer diagnosis on its own significantly raises the risk of suicide, the study found that a lung cancer diagnosis raised the odds of suicide by over four times compared to people in the general population. "A cancer diagnosis is an overwhelming diagnosis for patients psychologically and emotionally," explained study senior author Dr. Jeffrey Port. "It is a very tough diagnosis for patients to manage, and there is a higher suicide rate," he added. Port is a professor of cardiothoracic surgery at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City. The study included data from over 3 million patients during a 40-year period. Cancer diagnoses were linked to over 6,600 suicides. Although the study wasn't designed to prove a direct cause-and-effect relationship, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Dysthymia

More Cancers Caught Early Since Obamacare

Posted 18 May 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 18, 2017 – More cancers have been spotted in their early stages since the Affordable Care Act (ACA) became the law of the land, new research finds. Finding breast, colon, cervical and lung cancers early greatly improves the odds of successful treatment, said study author Xuesong Han. She's the strategic director of health policy and health care delivery research at the American Cancer Society. "We wanted to see if the introduction of the ACA affected the diagnosis of these cancers," she said. Although the increase in early-stage cancer diagnosis was only 1 percent, it's a significant increase that includes thousands of patients whose cancer might not have been found until it was too late for effective treatment and potential cure, Han noted. The increases in diagnosis of lung and cervical cancer were mostly among people on Medicaid, she said. A large part of the ACA is ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Cervical Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Diagnosis and Investigation, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Osteolytic Bone Metastases of Breast Cancer

Study Says Blood-Chromosome Test Predicts Lung Cancer's Return

Posted 26 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 26, 2017 – Unstable chromosomes within lung cancer tumors increase the risk that the cancer will return after surgery, researchers report. The investigators said they used this new information to forecast the return of lung cancer long before standard tests could spot it. The findings were published April 26 in the New England Journal of Medicine and Nature. The Cancer Research UK-funded TRACERx study included 100 patients with non-small cell lung cancer. The study participants were followed from diagnosis, through surgery, to either cure or disease relapse. Patients with a high proportion of unstable chromosomes in their tumors had more than quadruple the risk of their cancer returning, or of dying from their disease, within two years, the findings showed. The study offers "new insights into how tumors evolve and evade treatment, a leading cause of cancer death," lead ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation

'Cancer Profile' Is Changing for Americans With HIV

Posted 5 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 5, 2017 – As HIV becomes a lifetime disease instead of a killer, researchers say these patients will likely start to mirror other Americans when it comes to the kinds of cancers they develop. By 2030, the total number of cancers in HIV-positive people is expected to decline dramatically, as fewer patients develop tumors linked to a ravaged immune system, the new report suggested. Prostate, lung and liver cancer are predicted to become the most common cancers in this group, followed by anal cancer, which is linked to the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV). "They're starting to look more like people without HIV in a lot of ways, but the cancer risk will still be different," said Michael Silverberg, a research scientist with Kaiser Permanente Northern California. He was not involved in the study. In the early years of the AIDS epidemic, patients developed ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Prostate Cancer, HIV Infection, Lung Cancer

Survival Continues to Improve for Most Cancers

Posted 31 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 31, 2017 – Overall cancer death rates in the United States continue to fall, but racial gaps persist, a new report says. Death rates fell between 2010 and 2014 for 11 of the 16 most common cancers in men and for 13 of the most common types in women, including lung, colon, prostate and breast cancers. However, death rates rose for cancers of the liver, pancreas and brain in men and for the liver and uterus in women. And improvements in cancer survival weren't equal for all Americans. "While this report found that five-year survival for most types of cancer improved among both blacks and whites over the past several decades, racial disparities for many common cancers have persisted, and they may have increased for prostate cancer and female breast cancer," said Dr. Lynne Penberthy. She's associate director of the U.S. National Cancer Institute's Surveillance Research ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Brain Tumor, Melanoma, Pancreatic Cancer, Skin Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Endometrial Cancer, Osteosarcoma, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Bladder Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic

Helping Cancer Caregivers Help Themselves

Posted 22 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 22, 2017 – When people are diagnosed with cancer, it's easy to overlook the toll the disease also takes on their caregivers, say social workers who specialize in cancer care. Cancer can dramatically alter relationships, forcing parents to depend on their children, or independent people to rely on loved ones. Meanwhile, those who support cancer patients – such as spouses, partners, siblings, children or friends – tend to put their own needs on the back burner. Caregivers who keep their mind and body healthy, however, are able to provide better care for their loved ones, advise Lauren Kriegel and Autumn Banta, oncology social workers at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. Finding the time and energy to take care of yourself may seem difficult while caring for someone with cancer, Kriegel and Banta pointed out in a Rutgers news release. However, there are ways ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer

Smoking Rates Drop After Global Tobacco Treaty

Posted 22 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 22, 2017 – After 180 countries agreed to a global tobacco control treaty in 2005, there was a 2.5 percent decrease in smoking worldwide during the next decade, a new study shows. All of the participating countries agreed to the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). Signing countries committed to introducing policies such as high tobacco taxes and smoke-free public spaces. They also agreed to warning labels, advertising bans, and support for smoking cessation services. "The study provides strong evidence that the FCTC has led to a significant increase in the implementation of tobacco control measures," said study co-author Geoffrey Fong, professor of psychology and health studies at the University of Waterloo in Canada. He and his colleagues reviewed data from 116 countries that signed the treaty and 10 that didn't. Overall, smoking ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Nicotine, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Nicorette, Nicoderm CQ, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Nicotrol Inhaler, Commit, Habitrol, Nicorelief, Nicorette DS, Nicotrol NS, ProStep, Nicotrol TD

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