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Related terms: Cancer, Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Cancer, Lung

It's Never Too Late to Stop Smoking

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 – You're never too old to reap the health benefits of quitting smoking, a new study finds. "Even participants who quit smoking as recently as in their 60s were 23 percent less likely to die during follow-up than those who continued to smoke into their 70s," said lead researcher Sarah Nash, who conducted the study while at the U.S. National Cancer Institute. In addition, the age at which you start smoking can have an impact on longevity, the researchers found. "This study confirms that age at smoking initiation and cessation, both key components of smoking duration, continue to be important predictors of mortality in U.S. adults over age 70," Nash said. "It also underscores the importance of measures to prevent initiation, as well as encourage cessation, for all smokers," she added. Nash is currently with the Alaska Native Epidemiology Center at the Alaska ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Stomach Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer

Cancer Advances Demand Continual Funding, Specialists Say

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 29, 2016 – Sufficient and sustained funding for cancer research should be a global priority, European and American cancer organizations said at the start of an international oncology conference in Germany on Tuesday. Significant progress has been made in the understanding of how cancer develops. But, consistent research funding is needed to take advantage of these advances to improve cancer survival rates, according to specialists from two of the cancer organizations sponsoring the Munich meeting. "There has never been a more exciting time in cancer research," said Dr. Denis Lacombe, director general of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC). "With the surge in molecular biology developments and a growing consideration for cost-benefit balance from a public health perspective, there is an increasing need to invest in cancer research and ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Bladder Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer

Smoking Plus Diabetes a Very Deadly Mix

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 – While smoking is tough enough on health, adding in diabetes boosts the risk of an early death even more, new research confirms. Heavy smokers who also have diabetes are at twice the risk of an early death compared to smokers without the blood sugar disease, the study found. "Smoking is bad for all, but even more in those with diabetes," said Dr. Joel Zonszein, director of the Clinical Diabetes Center at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. He reviewed the new findings. The study was conducted by researchers at the University of Colorado, Denver, and involved data on more than 53,000 Americans who were either current or former heavy smokers. The overall risk of an early death was roughly double if the smoker had diabetes, the researchers reported. Overall, almost 13 percent of smokers with diabetes died during the seven-year study period, compared with ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Diabetes, Type 1, Diabetic Neuropathy, Insulin Resistance, Diabetic Nerve Damage, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Pre-Diabetes, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Intravenous Insulin Drip

CDC Reveals Top 5 Causes of Death

Posted 20 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 – Heart disease tops the list of what's most likely to kill you or someone you love, U.S. health officials reported Thursday. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released data naming the five leading causes of death among Americans under age 80 for 2014. After heart disease, cancer was the most likely cause of death. Rounding out the list were stroke; chronic lower respiratory diseases, such as asthma, bronchitis and emphysema; and accidents, the report said. Nearly two-thirds of deaths in the United States were caused by these five diseases or conditions. And many of these deaths were preventable. Thirty percent of heart disease deaths, 15 percent of cancer deaths, 28 percent of stroke deaths, 36 percent of chronic lower respiratory disease deaths, and 43 percent of accident deaths were preventable, the CDC researchers said. The good news in ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Heart Disease, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Breast Cancer, Heart Attack, Bronchitis, Pneumonia, Lung Cancer, Myocardial Infarction, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Smoking Wreaks Genetic Havoc on Lungs, Study Warns

Posted 4 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 4, 2016 – Smoking is linked to significant genetic damage in the lungs and other organs of the body, according to new research. "This study offers fresh insights into how tobacco smoke causes cancer," said co-lead author Ludmil Alexandrov, the Oppenheimer Fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico. "Our analysis demonstrates that tobacco smoking causes mutations that lead to cancer by multiple distinct mechanisms," he said in a Los Alamos news release. "Tobacco smoking damages DNA in organs directly exposed to smoke as well as speeds up a mutational cellular clock in organs that are both directly and indirectly exposed to smoke." In the study, researchers from Los Alamos, the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in England and other institutions analyzed more than 5,000 cancer tumors from smokers and nonsmokers. Cancer is caused by mutations in the DNA of a cell, ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Bronchogenic Carcinoma

Gene Test May ID Chemo Patients at Risk of Clots: Study

Posted 1 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 1, 2016 – Genetic testing could help identify breast cancer patients at high risk for the formation of blood clots in their veins, new research suggests. This problem, called venous thromboembolism (VTE), is a serious and potentially fatal complication that can occur during cancer treatment, particularly chemotherapy. Because breast cancer is one of the most common cancers, breast cancer patients account for a large number of cancer-related VTE cases, said study author Judith Brand. She's a postdoctoral researcher in the department of medical epidemiology and biostatistics at Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. Venous thromboembolism is preventable through treatment with an anti-clotting drug. But side effects, such as bleeding, mean this therapy is not routinely used in patients undergoing chemotherapy, the researchers explained. The new study included more than ... Read more

Related support groups: Blood Disorders, Cancer, Warfarin, Coumadin, Breast Cancer, Xarelto, Prostate Cancer, Pradaxa, Lovenox, Eliquis, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Heparin, Melanoma, Rivaroxaban, Enoxaparin, Fragmin, Apixaban, Clexane, Arixtra

FDA Approves Merck’s Keytruda (pembrolizumab) for First-Line Treatment of Certain Patients with Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Posted 25 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

KENILWORTH, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE) October 24, 2016 --Merck (NYSE: MRK), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Keytruda (pembrolizumab), the company’s anti-PD-1 (programmed death receptor-1) therapy, for the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors have high PD-L1 expression (tumor proportion score [TPS] of 50 percent or more) as determined by an FDA-approved test, with no EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations. With this new indication, Keytruda is now the only anti-PD-1 therapy to be approved in the first-line treatment setting for these patients. In addition, the FDA approved a labeling update to include data from KEYNOTE-010 in the second-line or greater treatment setting for patients with metastatic NSCLC whose tumors express PD-L1 (TPS of ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Keytruda, Pembrolizumab

FDA Approves Genentech’s Cancer Immunotherapy Tecentriq (Atezolizumab) for People with a Specific Type of Metastatic Lung Cancer

Posted 19 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

South San Francisco, CA – October 18, 2016 – Genentech, a member of the Roche Group (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY), today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Tecentriq (atezolizumab) for the treatment of people with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have disease progression during or following platinum-containing chemotherapy, and have progressed on an appropriate FDA-approved targeted therapy if their tumor has EGFR or ALK gene abnormalities. This approval is based on results from the randomized Phase III OAK and Phase II POPLAR studies. The largest study, OAK, showed that Tecentriq helped people in the overall study population live a median of 13.8 months, 4.2 months longer than those treated with docetaxel chemotherapy (median overall survival [OS]: 13.8 vs. 9.6 months; HR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.63, 0.87). The study enrolled people ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Tecentriq, Atezolizumab

Freeze Therapy: An Alternative to Breast Cancer Surgery?

Posted 12 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 – A freezing technique known as cryoablation might be a viable alternative to lumpectomy for treating small, early stage breast cancers, researchers report. In the small study of 86 patients, "cryoablation was shown to successfully [treat] the majority of small breast cancers with few side effects or complications," said study co-author Dr. Deanna Attai. She's an assistant clinical professor of surgery at the University of California, Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine. Using this minimally invasive approach to destroy cancer cells, there should be little to no change in the appearance of the breast, said Attai, immediate past president of the American Society of Breast Surgeons. The major risk, Attai said, is not killing all the cancerous cells. Another surgeon noted that although further research is still needed, cryoablation appears to be "a potential ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Lung Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Breast Cancer - Adjuvant, Breast Cancer, Prevention

Cancer Patients in Poorer Countries Often Go Without Radiation

Posted 2 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 29, 2016 – Many cancer patients in low- and middle-income nations who would benefit from radiation treatment don't receive it, a new study finds. "In Ghana and the Philippines, for example, about eight in 10 cancer patients who need radiation therapy will not receive needed treatment," said study co-author Dr. Elena Fidarova, a researcher at the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria. She and her colleagues analyzed data from nine nations: Costa Rica, Ghana, Malaysia, the Philippines, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia, Tunisia and Uruguay. Overall, about five out of 10 cancer patients in these countries require radiation therapy to shrink tumors and kill cancer cells. But up to half of them do not have access to it, the researchers found. In individual nations, the rates of patients who can benefit from radiation therapy but do not receive it ranged from 18 to 82 ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Brain Tumor, Bladder Cancer, History - Radiation Therapy

Secondhand Smoke More Insidious Than Thought

Posted 28 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28, 2016 – Nonsmokers can be exposed to secondhand cigarette smoke without realizing it, and be unaware that they are at increased risk for lung cancer and heart disease, a new study suggests. The discovery highlights the need for a more accurate way to assess secondhand smoke exposure than having patients fill out questionnaires. "A crucial finding of this study is that nonsmokers are exposed to secondhand smoke without even realizing it," said lead researcher Dr. Raja Flores. He is chair of thoracic surgery at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. The researchers used blood levels of cotinine, a byproduct of nicotine, as a marker for secondhand smoke exposure in more than 20,000 nonsmokers. The investigators found a significant increase in years of life lost across all levels of cotinine in the blood. The lowest levels of cotinine were ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Lung Cancer

New Type of Radiation Treatment May Up Survival for Older Lung Cancer Patients

Posted 26 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 26, 2016 – Cutting-edge radiation therapy seems to provide a significant survival advantage for older people with early stage lung cancer who aren't strong enough for surgery, a pair of new studies suggests. The therapy is called stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and it's been available for about a decade. The first study reviewed national cancer data and found that survival rates for older lung cancer patients treated with radiation therapy increased dramatically between 2004 and 2012. Those are the years during which SBRT use became widespread in the United States, said lead researcher Dr. Andrew Farach, a radiation oncologist at Houston Methodist Hospital. A second study based on Veterans Affairs cancer treatment data appears to corroborate the national findings, directly linking increased use of SBRT with improved survival rates in elderly patients. Farach ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, History - Radiation Therapy, Bronchogenic Carcinoma

More Cancer Patients Gaining From Immune-Based Treatments

Posted 20 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 20, 2016 – A leading cancer group says more Americans are benefiting from immunotherapy – a relatively new treatment approach that helps the immune system target and destroy cancer cells. "The promise of immunotherapy for cancer therapy has never been greater, and the opportunity to make significant progress in this critical area is real," said Dr. Nancy Davidson, president of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). The AACR issued the news on immunotherapy as part of its 2016 Cancer Progress Report. As the group explained, more types of cancer are being successfully treated with immunotherapy. This treatment involves adding new cancer-fighting cells to the body or adding new elements, such as antibodies and proteins, to help the immune system fight cancer. In August 2015, one class of immunotherapy drugs – called checkpoint inhibitors – was approved for ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Bladder Cancer, Opdivo, Head and Neck Cancer, Keytruda, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Tecentriq, Nivolumab, Pembrolizumab, Atezolizumab

14 Genes That May Affect Cancer Treatment

Posted 31 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 31, 2016 – Researchers say they've identified 14 genes that may help determine whether a cancer treatment could help a patient. The researchers also say the findings suggest it could be possible to help people avoid unnecessary cancer treatments that won't likely benefit them. "The history of cancer treatment is filled with overreaction," said principal investigator Gary Karpen, a senior scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, Calif. "It is part of the ethics of cancer treatment to err on the side of overtreatment, but these treatments have serious side effects associated with them. For some people, it may be causing more trouble than if the growth was left untreated," Karpen said in a Berkeley Lab release. However, there has not been a reliable way to determine which early stage cancer patients will respond to ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Bronchogenic Carcinoma

Smog May Shorten Lives of Lung Cancer Patients

Posted 5 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 5, 2016 – Air pollution may shorten the lives of lung cancer patients, a new study suggests. Researchers led by Sandrah Eckel, who's with the department of preventive medicine at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, analyzed data from more than 352,000 people in California who were diagnosed with lung cancer between 1988 and 2009. Higher exposure to the pollutants nitrogen dioxide, ozone and airborne particles was associated with an increased risk of early death. The association was strongest in patients with early stage disease, particularly adenocarcinoma, which accounts for 80 percent of lung cancer cases, the researchers said. Early stage patients with greater exposure to pollutants survived on average 2.4 years compared to 5.7 years for those with low exposure, the study found. The study was published online Aug. 4 in the journal Thorax. Since this ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Bronchogenic Carcinoma

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