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New Hepatitis C Infections Hit 15-Year High: CDC

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 12, 2017 – Reports of new hepatitis C infections in the United States nearly tripled over five years, reaching a 15-year high, federal government data show. The highest number of new infections were reported among 20- to 29-year-olds. Many stemmed from the growing use of injected drugs linked to the current opioid epidemic, officials said. The number of reported cases rose from 850 in 2010 to 2,436 in 2015, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But nearly half of people who have the liver infection don't know it, so most new cases are never reported. The CDC estimated there were actually about 34,000 new hepatitis C infections nationwide in 2015. "We must reach the hardest-hit communities with a range of prevention and treatment services that can diagnose people with hepatitis C and link them to treatment. This wide range of services can also ... Read more

Related support groups: Hepatitis C, Viral Infection, Liver and Pancreatic Disease

Obesity in Youth Tied to Higher Odds for Liver Cancer in Men

Posted 21 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 21, 2017 – Overweight and obese young men are at increased risk for serious liver disease or liver cancer later in life, and those with diabetes have an even higher risk, a new study warns. Efforts to reduce obesity, "should be implemented from an early age to reduce the future burden of severe liver disease on individuals and society," say Swedish researchers led by Hannes Hagstrom, of the Center for Digestive Diseases at Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm. A liver specialist in the United States agreed. "This should be a wake-up call for young men to take their weight seriously and take steps to stay in shape to hopefully prevent liver disease, diabetes and liver cancer in the future," said Dr. David Bernstein, chief of hepatology at Northwell Health in Manhasset, NY. He explained that obesity is linked to the development of a condition called non-alcoholic ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Cirrhosis, Liver Cirrhosis, Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Liver and Pancreatic Disease, Benign Liver Tumor, Hepatic Tumor

U.S. Vaccine Guidelines for Flu, HPV Updated

Posted 7 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 7, 2017 – Roll up your sleeves, America. A national advisory panel of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released its 2017 advisory for recommended shots affecting adults. This year's advisory revises guidance on seasonal flu shots by eliminating nasal flu vaccines and modifying flu-shot advice for people with egg allergy. It also tweaks recommendations for vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV), hepatitis B and meningococcal disease. Doctors use the annually updated vaccine schedule to ensure that patients receive the right vaccines for their age, medical condition and other risk factors. The entire list includes 13 vaccinations. "All adults need immunizations to help them prevent getting and spreading serious disease that could result in poor health, missed work, medical bills, and not being able to care for family," said the report's lead ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, HIV Infection, Liver Cirrhosis, Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Autoimmune Disorders, Gardasil, Liver and Pancreatic Disease, Hepatitis B Adult Vaccine, Twinrix, Human Papillomavirus Vaccine, Hepatitis B Prevention, Cervarix, Meningococcal Meningitis Prophylaxis, Human Papillomavirus Prophylaxis, Tetanus Immune Globulin, Hepatitis B Prophylaxis, Influenza Prophylaxis, HyperTET S/D, Vaccination and Prophlaxis, Engerix-B

Rates of Early Deaths Rise for Whites, Drop for Blacks

Posted 26 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2017 – Premature death rates in the United States have fallen for some groups but risen in others, a federal study says. Researchers looked at death certificate data from 1999 to 2014. They found that rates of premature death (between ages 25 to 64) declined among blacks, Hispanics and Asian/Pacific Islanders. At the same time, the rates went up for whites and American Indians/Alaska Natives. "Death at any age is devastating for those left behind, but premature death is especially so, in particular for children and parents," said study senior author Amy Berrington, from the U.S. National Cancer Institute. "Our study can be used to target prevention and surveillance efforts to help those groups in greatest need," she said in an agency news release. There were fewer deaths from cancer, heart disease and HIV for blacks, Hispanics and Asian/Pacific Islanders. Success in ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Opiate Dependence, Major Depressive Disorder, Opiate Withdrawal, Drug Dependence, Substance Abuse, Liver and Pancreatic Disease, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Benzodiazepine Overdose

Newer Hepatitis C Drugs May Pose Health Risks: Study

Posted 25 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

Newer drugs to cure hepatitis C may put patients at risk for liver failure and other severe side effects, according to a new study from a U.S. nonprofit group that examines drug safety. The study by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices is based on an analysis of U.S. Food and Drug Administration data and reports from doctors worldwide on adverse events possibly caused by the nine widely used antiviral drugs, The New York Times reported. Two of the drugs, Sovaldi and Harvoni, are so-called blockbusters made by Gilead Sciences and priced at $1,000 a pill. Sovaldi was approved in 2013 and Harvoni in 2014. These and other antiviral drugs can cure hepatitis C in 12 weeks in many patients. The number of adverse events is fairly small and the findings are not conclusive, but experts say the study published online Wednesday should serve as a warning, The Times reported. The study said ... Read more

Related support groups: Hepatitis C, Harvoni, Sovaldi, Ribavirin, Incivek, Epclusa, Victrelis, Sofosbuvir, Liver and Pancreatic Disease, Copegus, Ribasphere, Telaprevir, Boceprevir, Rebetol, Ledipasvir/sofosbuvir, Interferon Alfa-2B/Ribavirin, RibaPak, Olysio, Rebetron, Virazole

Even One High-Fat Meal Can Harm Your Liver, Study Finds

Posted 24 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 – Eating a high-fat meal – say, a cheeseburger and fries or a pepperoni pizza – disrupts liver function, a new, small study reveals. Researchers found that the high levels of saturated fat found in such rich foods immediately alter the work of the liver, possibly setting the body up for serious disease down the line. "The effects mimic the abnormalities seen in people with severe metabolic disease," said study co-author Dr. Michael Roden, referring to conditions like fatty liver disease and cirrhosis. "Our findings paint the picture of the earliest changes in liver metabolism leading to fatty liver diseases and liver cirrhosis in the context of obesity and type 2 diabetes," said Roden. He's scientific director of the German Diabetes Center at Heinrich Heine University in Dusseldorf. How long these metabolic alterations last after people indulge in a rich meal ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Diabetes, Type 2, Cirrhosis, Liver Cirrhosis, Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Liver and Pancreatic Disease

More Evidence Linking Obesity to Liver Cancer

Posted 14 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 – Having a large waistline, a high body mass index (BMI) and type 2 diabetes, may raise your risk for liver cancer, a new study suggests. "We found that each of these three factors was associated, robustly, with liver cancer risk," said study co-author Peter Campbell. He's strategic director of digestive system cancer research at the American Cancer Society. Liver cancer rates have roughly tripled in the United States since the mid-1970s, "and the prognosis for patients diagnosed with this type of cancer is especially grim," Campbell said. He and his colleagues examined data on 1.57 million adults from 14 U.S. studies to look for an association between obesity and type 2 diabetes and liver cancer. None of the participants had cancer when the study began. Over time, 6.5 percent of the participants were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, which is an obesity-related ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Cancer, Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Liver and Pancreatic Disease, Hepatic Tumor

Teen Obesity May Mean Liver Disease Later

Posted 16 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 16, 2016 – Older teen boys who are overweight or obese could be at increased risk for severe liver disease later in life, a new study suggests. The research included nearly 45,000 Swedish males who entered military service in their late teens between 1969 and 1970. The investigators reviewed over 40 years of their health information. Nearly 400 of them were diagnosed with severe liver disease, the study authors said. Men who were overweight or obese in their late teens were 64 percent more likely to develop severe liver disease compared with men who had a low normal weight in their late teens. The researchers said that worked out to a 5 percent increased risk for every one point increase in body mass index (BMI). BMI is an estimate of body fat based on weight and height. Overweight is defined as a BMI above 25. Obesity is defined as a BMI above 30, according to the U.S. ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Liver and Pancreatic Disease

Health Tip: Using Aspirin Therapy

Posted 27 May 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Aspirin therapy may help reduce the risk of heart attack by thinning the blood and preventing clots. But it's not safe for everyone. The University of California - Davis Health System says you should be wary of aspirin therapy if you: Have kidney or liver disease. Drink three or more alcoholic beverages daily. Have uncontrolled high blood pressure. Take a blood-thinning medication. Have any possible symptoms of stroke. Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Aspirin, Ischemic Stroke, Excedrin, Aggrenox, Alka-Seltzer, Chronic Kidney Disease, Alcoholism, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Arthritis Pain, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Ecotrin, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Fiorinal with Codeine, Bayer Aspirin, Arthritis Pain Formula, Soma Compound, Norgesic

Generic Hepatitis C Drugs as Effective as Pricey Brand Names: Study

Posted 18 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, April 16, 2016 – Low-cost generic antiviral drugs are as effective and safe as more expensive brand-name drugs in treating people with hepatitis C, researchers report. In many countries, people don't have access to a course of brand-name direct-acting antiviral drugs due to the high cost – as much as $94,000 a patient, the researchers explained. However, mass-produced generic versions are available for less than 1 percent of the retail price of the brand-name drugs, they added. "Our interim data suggests a potential solution for hepatitis C patients in areas where treatment access has been restricted as a result of the high prices demanded for branded treatment," said study author Dr. James Freeman, of GP2U Telehealth in Hobart, Australia. The study of patients in the United States, Canada, Africa, Australia, Europe and Southeast Asia found that generic direct-acting ... Read more

Related support groups: Hepatitis C, Harvoni, Sovaldi, Ribavirin, Sofosbuvir, Daklinza, Liver and Pancreatic Disease, Copegus, Ribasphere, Rebetol, Ledipasvir/sofosbuvir, Interferon Alfa-2B/Ribavirin, RibaPak, Daclatasvir, Rebetron, Virazole, Hepatic Tumor, Moderiba, RibaTab

Hepatitis C-Infected Liver Transplants May Work Well for Those With the Virus

Posted 15 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 14, 2016 – Here's some potentially good news for people with hepatitis C who are waiting for liver transplants: Hepatitis C-infected livers seem to do as well as healthy livers in these patients, a new study indicates. The findings suggest that using hepatitis C-infected (HCV-positive) livers could help reduce wait times for people with hepatitis C who need a transplant, the researchers said. Hepatitis C is a virus that can infect the liver, leading to inflammation, scarring and liver cancer. More than 15,000 people in the United States are on the liver transplant waiting list, and about 16 percent will die before they receive a new liver, according to background notes with the study. In the United States, use of HCV-positive livers for liver transplants in people with hepatitis C has tripled, from less than 3 percent in 1995 to more than 9 percent in 2013. Researchers ... Read more

Related support groups: Hepatitis C, Liver and Pancreatic Disease, Organ Transplant - Rejection Reversal, Rejection Reversal

More People Surviving Sudden Liver Failure

Posted 4 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 4, 2016 – The chances of surviving acute liver failure have improved significantly over the past 16 years, a new study finds. In fact, 21-day patient survival increased from about 59 percent in 1998 to 75 percent in 2013, researchers found. Better diagnosis and treatment may account for this advance, they said. "Overall survival and transplant-free survival have improved, while the number of patients requiring transplantation has declined," said lead researcher Dr. William Lee, a liver specialist at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Acute liver failure, though rare, affects young people and is often fatal, he said. "It involves the rapid destruction of liver cells by either drugs or viruses, such as hepatitis A or B, resulting in loss of consciousness and failure of multiple organ systems," Lee said. The main cause of acute liver failure in ... Read more

Related support groups: Cirrhosis, Liver Cirrhosis, Liver and Pancreatic Disease

Gene Variant May Explain Higher Rates of Some Cancers in Black People

Posted 31 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 31, 2016 – A single gene variant may explain why black Americans with common cancers have shorter survival times and higher death rates than other races, a new study suggests. While some researchers have examined possible socioeconomic factors to explain these differences, others have focused on genetics. "We may finally have a truly genetic explanation for why African-Americans are more prone to a variety of cancers," said study senior author Maureen Murphy. She is a professor and program leader in the Molecular and Cellular Oncogenesis program at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia. "This is a variant that has never been observed in Caucasian populations, so identifying people who have this variant may be crucial for providing improved prognosis and personalized treatment that will lead to better outcomes," she said in an institute news release. In this study, ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Liver and Pancreatic Disease, Hepatic Tumor

Many Donor Livers for Sickest Patients Rejected, Study Finds

Posted 5 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 5, 2016 – It's common for transplant centers to reject donor livers for the sickest patients on the transplant waiting list, a new study suggests. That means those patients have a higher risk of death while they wait for a lifesaving transplant, the researchers found. The new study reviewed 23,000 donor liver offers to 13,255 U.S. patients on the liver transplant waiting list between May 2007 and June 2013. It found that only 37 percent of the organ offers were accepted for the sickest patients on the list. "We found that not only is there a wide variation in acceptance rates for donor organs among transplant centers, these variations directly correlated with whether the sickest patients would die waiting for a lifesaving transplant, with patients 27 percent more likely to die without a transplant for every 5 percent decrease in a center's adjusted organ offer acceptance ... Read more

Related support groups: Cirrhosis, Organ Transplant - Rejection Prophylaxis, Organ Transplant, Liver and Pancreatic Disease, Rejection Prophylaxis

Screening Inmates for Hepatitis C Benefits General Community: Study

Posted 23 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 23, 2015 – A prison-based hepatitis C screening and treatment program could benefit the broader community, researchers suggest. Besides reducing the spread of hepatitis C after prisoners are released, "universal [hepatitis C] testing and treatment in prisons would reduce outcomes of advanced [hepatitis C] such as liver cancer, end-stage liver disease and death among prisoners," said study senior author Jagpreet Chhatwal, of Massachusetts General Hospital's Institute for Technology Assessment in Boston. "We now have highly effective treatments for [hepatitis C], so we wanted to know the impact of providing routine testing and treatment to inmates, a group in which the infection is highly prevalent," Chhatwal said in a hospital news release. More than 1 percent of the U.S. population has hepatitis C, but the virus affects more than 17 percent of prisoners, the researchers ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Hepatitis C, Liver Cirrhosis, Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Liver and Pancreatic Disease, Benign Liver Tumor, Hepatic Coma, Hepatic Tumor, Liver Metastasis in Adenocarcinoma

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