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Related terms: Lewy body disease with dementia, Dementia with Lewy bodies

Does Living Near Major Roads Boost Dementia Risk?

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4, 2017 – Want to cut your chances for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias? A new study suggests that picking a home far from major roadways might help. The Canadian study found that people who lived relatively close to busy traffic had a slightly higher risk for dementia. More specifically, this type of mental decline was more common among those who lived within about 160 feet of a major street, the study found. And the closer people lived to heavy traffic, the stronger the association. The research, published Jan. 4 in The Lancet, couldn't prove cause-and-effect, only an association, the researchers stressed. However, "our study suggests that busy roads could be a source of environmental stressors that could give rise to the onset of dementia," study author Hong Chen, with Public Health Ontario, said in a journal news release. One neurologist who reviewed the ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Beta Blockers May Not Be Best Heart Drugs for Dementia Patients

Posted 12 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 12, 2016 – Beta blocker drugs are often the go-to medication for people who've survived a heart attack. But a new study suggests that they may not be the medicine of choice for nursing home residents with dementia. Taking the drugs reduced the risk of death during the study period by about a quarter, the researchers said. But the drugs were also associated with 34 percent higher risk that a patient with moderate or severe dementia would be unable to independently perform the functions of daily life. One heart expert who reviewed the findings said the study supports the notion that there's no "one-size-fits-all" approach to cardiovascular care. The findings highlight "the importance of personalizing medical care for an individual elderly patient following a heart attack," said Dr. Kevin Marzo. He is chief of cardiology at Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, N.Y. ... Read more

Related support groups: Metoprolol, Atenolol, Propranolol, Dementia, Bystolic, Carvedilol, Alzheimer's Disease, Bisoprolol, Coreg, Inderal, Sotalol, Toprol-XL, Lopressor, Timolol, Nadolol, Tenormin, Labetalol, Metoprolol Succinate ER, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Nebivolol

Was Football Safer Back in the Day?

Posted 12 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 12, 2016 – In a finding that suggests football used to be a less dangerous sport, a small study shows that men who played in high school in the 1950s and 1960s may not be at increased risk for dementia or memory problems. Nor did they show increased rates of Parkinson's disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The study used a small group of men, the researchers acknowledged. But, they added, the results are in line with an earlier study that examined men who'd played high school football in the 1940s and 1950s. "What we can say is, for that era, football did not increase the risks of neurodegenerative disease compared with other sports," said senior researcher Dr. Rodolfo Savica, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. That might sound surprising, given evidence that former professional football players can face ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Parkinsonian Tremor, Parkinsonism, Lewy Body Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

Aerobic Exercise May Help Guard Against Dementia

Posted 30 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 – Aerobic exercise may strengthen memory and thinking skills in older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a small study suggests. People with mild cognitive impairment are at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease. The study included 16 people, average age 63, who did aerobic workouts such as on a treadmill, stationary bike or elliptical training. They worked out four times a week for six months. There was also a control group of 19 people, average age 67, who did stretching exercises four times a week for six months but no aerobic activity. All of the participants had mild cognitive impairment. After six months, brain scans revealed that those in the aerobic exercise group had greater increases in brain volume than those in the stretching group, the researchers said. Those in the exercise group also showed significant improvement in thinking and ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Can Occupational Therapy Slow Alzheimer's Decline?

Posted 21 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2016 – Home-based occupational therapy may not slow down the physical decline that comes with Alzheimer's disease, a new clinical trial suggests. The study looked at whether home visits from occupational therapists could put the brakes on Alzheimer's patients' "functional decline." As the brain disorder progresses, it's not only memory that fades, but also day-to-day functioning. People gradually lose their ability to perform routine tasks – such as making meals, using household items and bathing and dressing. The goal of occupational therapy is to help family caregivers manage those difficulties. Sessions might address safe bathing or helping a loved one in and out of a car, for instance. In the two-year study, the hope was that weaving occupational therapy into Alzheimer's patients' primary care would slow down their functional decline. But that did not happen, said ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia

Fewer Americans Suffering From Dementia, Study Finds

Posted 21 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2016 – Here's some good news for America's seniors: Dementia rates have dropped dramatically over the last decade or so, according to a new study. An analysis of responses from a study of more than 10,000 people aged 65 and older found the prevalence of dementia dropped about 24 percent between 2000 and 2012. The reasons for the decline aren't clear, researchers say. But two factors stand out: The participants in 2012 had more years of schooling than those in 2000; and chronic conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes were being controlled more aggressively. "The decline in dementia risk among older adults that we found in our study – and that an increasing number of other studies around the world have found – does not mean that Alzheimer's and dementia have been solved," said lead researcher Dr. Kenneth Langa. He is a professor of medicine at the ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Lewy Body Dementia

Brain Scans May Improve Dementia Diagnosis, Treatment

Posted 8 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 8, 2016 – Tens of millions of people worldwide suffer from memory loss and mental impairment due to dementia. While there's no cure, medication may temporarily improve some symptoms. Proper treatment, however, depends on identifying the type of dementia and early detection. A new study shows that MRI brain scans can help doctors tell which people with certain thinking and memory problems might go on to develop dementia with Lewy bodies rather than Alzheimer's disease. The researchers found that scans from people who eventually developed Lewy body dementia showed a lack of shrinkage in a portion of the brain related to memory, known as the hippocampus. "Identifying people with mild cognitive impairment at risk for dementia with Lewy bodies is critical for early interventions with the potential treatments emerging in the field," said study author Dr. Kejal Kantarci. She's a ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Alcoholic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Head Imaging, Dementia with Depressive Features, Lewy Body Dementia

Study Links Disasters to Dementia

Posted 25 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 – Earthquakes, floods and other natural disasters may raise dementia risk for seniors forced to leave their homes, a new study suggests. "In the aftermath of disasters, most people focus on mental health issues like PTSD," said study author Hiroyuki Hikichi, a research fellow at Harvard University's School of Public Health, in Boston. "But our study suggests that cognitive decline is also an important issue," Hikichi said in a university news release. Relocation to a temporary shelter after a disaster may have the unintended effect of separating people not just from their homes but from their neighbors – and both may speed up mental decline among vulnerable people, Hikichi's team noted. Researchers looked at nearly 3,600 survivors of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan. All were 65 and older. The rate of dementia in this group was 4.1 percent before the ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation, Lewy Body Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

Health Tip: Health Tip: Risk Factors for Malnutrition

Posted 17 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Certain risk factors make you more prone than others to malnutrition, which doesn't necessarily come from lack of food. It's possible to be obese and not get enough nutrients (malnourishment) at the same time, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics says. According to the academy, here are common risk factors for malnutrition: Hospitalization. Advanced age, particularly if accompanied by dementia. Dental health problems. Loss of appetite. Serious head injury. Eating disorder. Serious infection. Organ failure. Read more

Related support groups: Weight Loss, Oral and Dental Conditions, Xerostomia, Dementia, Toothache, Binge Eating Disorder, Head Injury, Alzheimer's Disease, Eating Disorder, Gingivitis, Dental Abscess, Anorexia, Bulimia, Weight Loss/Failure to Thrive, Periodontitis, Anorexia nervosa, Prevention of Dental Caries, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Lewy Body Dementia, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Sudden Drops in Blood Pressure Tied to Higher Odds for Dementia

Posted 11 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 – There seems to be an association between sudden drops in blood pressure upon standing up – a condition called orthostatic hypotension – and an increased risk for dementia, according to a new study. The study of 6,000 Dutch people could only point to an association between sudden low blood pressure and dementia, and couldn't prove cause-and-effect. However, a geriatrician in the United States said the link is worth investigating. "The study adds to the increasing body of knowledge that links cerebral blood flow to cognitive [thinking] disorders," said Dr. Irving Gomolin, chief of geriatric medicine at Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, N.Y. The new study was led by Arfan Ikram and Frank Wolters, of Erasmus Medical Center in the Netherlands. They analyzed 24 years of data from more than 6,000 people and found that those with orthostatic hypotension – low ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Hypotension, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

High Blood Pressure May Hike Dementia Risk

Posted 10 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 – High blood pressure, particularly in middle age, might open the door to dementia, the American Heart Association warns in a new scientific statement. Dementia affects some 30 million to 40 million people worldwide. That number is expected to triple by 2050, as the world's population ages and treatments remain elusive, the association noted. "People with high blood pressure tend to have more dementia," said statement author Dr. Costantino Iadecola. He is a professor of neurology and neuroscience at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City. Whether controlling high blood pressure ("hypertension") reduces the odds of developing dementia, however, has not been scientifically proven, he said. "There are a lot of small observational studies that looked at people who were treated for blood pressure and, generally, there was an improvement in cognition [thinking ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia

Study Finds Fault With ICU Treatment of Dementia Patients

Posted 10 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 – A new study raises red flags about the use of ventilators among dementia patients in intensive care units. Researchers analyzed data from about 635,000 hospitalizations of U.S. nursing home patients with advanced dementia. Between 2000 and 2013, ventilator use among these patients, whose average age was 84, nearly doubled at the 2,600 hospitals studied. But more than 80 percent of the patients died within a year, the study found. The results suggest ventilators are being overused, leading to unnecessary patient suffering and higher health care costs, according to the authors of the study published Oct. 10 in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. "These findings call for new efforts to ensure that the use of mechanical ventilation is consistent with patient's goals of care and their clinical condition," said corresponding author Dr. Joan Teno. She is a professor of ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Drug-Induced Dementia, Assisted Ventilation Therapy, Lewy Body Dementia

Fallout From 9/11 May Include Early Dementia

Posted 30 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 30, 2016 – The 9/11 attack on the World Trade Center continues to the ravage the minds of those who responded to the Twin Towers collapse, new research shows. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) experienced by many rescuers and other first responders now appears linked to mental decline and dementia, the study authors found. "People with PTSD, regardless from where they get it, are more likely to have cognitive impairment earlier," said lead researcher Sean Clouston, referring to memory and thinking abnormalities. About one-fifth of the World Trade Center responders developed PTSD, according to background notes with the study. "World Trade Center PTSD is associated with potential cognitive impairment, and cognitive impairment is a risk factor for dementia," said Clouston, an assistant professor of family population and preventive medicine at Stony Brook University in ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation, Lewy Body Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

Even a Little Exercise May Help Stave Off Dementia

Posted 26 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 26, 2016 – Couch potatoes have a higher risk of developing dementia in old age, a new study reports. Seniors who get little to no exercise have a 50 percent greater risk of dementia compared with those who regularly take part in moderate or heavy amounts of physical activity, the researchers found. Moderate physical activity can include walking briskly, bicycling slower than 10 miles an hour, ballroom dancing or gardening, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "It doesn't require intensive physical activity to decrease risk of dementia," said senior researcher Dr. Zaldy Tan. He is medical director of the Alzheimer's and Dementia Care Program at University of California, Los Angeles. "Even moderate amounts are fine." Study participants aged 75 or older gained the most protective benefit from exercise against the onset of dementia, the findings ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Calcium Supplements Might Raise Older Women's Dementia Risk

Posted 18 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 17, 2016 – Taking calcium supplements with the hope of keeping osteoporosis at bay may raise an older woman's risk of dementia, a new study suggests. And that seems particularly true if a woman has already sustained an event causing poor blood flow to the brain (cerebrovascular disease), such as from a stroke, researchers said. The study can't prove cause-and-effect. However, dementia risk was seven times higher in female stroke survivors who took calcium supplements, compared to women with a history of stroke who didn't use the supplements, the findings showed. The risk of dementia also was three times higher in women with white matter brain lesions who took calcium supplements, compared to women with white matter lesions who didn't take the supplements. Lesions in white matter tissue are evidence of a mini-stroke or some other problem impeding blood flow within the ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoporosis, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Fracture, bone, Prevention of Osteoporosis, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Caltrate 600 with D, Citracal + D, Calcium/Vitamin D, Citracal Petites, Oysco 500 with D, Citracal Creamy Bites, Oyster Shell Calcium, Calcet, Calcium 600 D, Calcarb with D, Oyster-D, Calcium/folic Acid/ginger/pyridoxine, Os-Cal 500 + D, Prevention of Fractures

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