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Related terms: Lewy body disease with dementia, Dementia with Lewy bodies

Alzheimer's Deaths Jump 55 Percent: CDC

Posted 3 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 – As more baby boomers age, deaths from Alzheimer's disease have jumped 55 percent, and in a quarter of those cases the heavy burden of caregiving has fallen on loved ones, U.S. health officials report. "Alzheimer's disease is a public health problem that affects not only people with Alzheimer's disease, but also the people who provide care to them, which is often family members," said report author Christopher Taylor. He's an epidemiologist at the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. The number of Americans over 65 is growing rapidly, and age is the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, Taylor noted. One Alzheimer's expert described the news as dire. "This is an enormous problem that is only growing, it's only going to get worse – we are staring at a tsunami of Alzheimer's disease," said Keith Fargo, director of ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Lewy Body Dementia, Alcoholic Dementia

Study Looks at Parkinson's Effect on Life Span

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 15, 2017 – People with brain diseases such as Parkinson's and dementia with Lewy bodies die about two years earlier compared with people who don't have these conditions, a new study suggests. The report provides new clues about the survival of patients with degenerative brain diseases, researchers at the Mayo Clinic said. "Our results may be helpful to guide clinicians counseling patients and caregivers," Dr. Rodolfo Savica and colleagues wrote in the report published May 15 in JAMA Neurology. The study initially looked at all residents of Minnesota's Olmsted County. The investigators then compared survival rates between 461 people with certain degenerative brain diseases and 452 healthy people in the general population. The study participants with degenerative brain diseases were diagnosed between 1991 and 2010. Just over 300 had Parkinson's disease; 55 had Parkinson's ... Read more

Related support groups: Parkinson's Disease, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Parkinsonian Tremor, Parkinsonism, Lewy Body Dementia, Parkinson's Disease Psychosis

Blood Thinners May Prevent Dementia in Atrial Fibrillation Patients

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 12, 2017 – Blood thinners are often prescribed to prevent strokes in people with the abnormal heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation. But a new study suggests these drugs may also help keep dementia at bay. The researchers said that the key is to start blood thinners, such as warfarin, soon after atrial fibrillation is diagnosed. That's true even for people at low risk of a stroke who wouldn't normally be given blood thinners. "We found that people who are on warfarin – the most common blood thinner used to prevent stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation – experienced very low rates of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease," said lead researcher Dr. T. Jared Bunch. He's director of heart rhythm research at Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Murray, Utah. Atrial fibrillation is a common heart abnormality that affects nearly 3 million American adults. ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Warfarin, Coumadin, Atrial Fibrillation, Ischemic Stroke, Xarelto, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Eliquis, Excedrin, Transient Ischemic Attack, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Aggrenox, Alka-Seltzer, Fiorinal, Rivaroxaban, Excedrin Migraine, Arthritis Pain, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Ecotrin

Mid-Life Exercise Could Jog Your Memory

Posted 25 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 – Can a new exercise regimen boost your brain health if you're over 50? Possibly, suggests a new research review that found middle-age folks can improve their thinking and memory skills by adopting regular moderate-to-vigorous routines involving aerobic and resistance exercise. "When we combined the available data from [39 previous] studies, we were able to show that undertaking physical exercise was able to improve the brain function of people aged 50 and over," said study lead author Joseph Northey. He's a doctoral candidate and teaching fellow at the University of Canberra Research Institute for Sport and Exercise in Australia. The review included 18 studies that looked at the impact of aerobic exercise – such as walking, running and swimming – on thinking, alertness, information processing, executing goals and memory skills. Resistance training, such as ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Lewy Body Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

Nursing Home Program Offers Alternatives to Antipsychotic Drugs

Posted 20 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 20, 2017 – Hoping to cut the use of antipsychotic drugs in nursing home residents, researchers tried training staff on new ways to meet the needs of residents with dementia. Although antipsychotics are often given to people with dementia, the drugs are only minimally effective at controlling behavioral problems and have been shown to increase the chances for stroke and death, the researchers said. "This intervention focused on treating the residents as human beings with needs, not as patients with problems," said lead author Dr. Jennifer Tjia. The new study included 93 nursing homes in Massachusetts. Staff – including nurses, nursing assistants, dietary staff and receptionists – were trained to recognize that difficult behavior by residents with dementia is a sign that they have unmet needs. The program, called OASIS, provides employees with the knowledge, skills and ... Read more

Related support groups: Seroquel, Abilify, Latuda, Zyprexa, Risperidone, Risperdal, Dementia, Quetiapine, Geodon, Saphris, Seroquel XR, Alzheimer's Disease, Olanzapine, Invega, Rexulti, Clozapine, Aripiprazole, Clozaril, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Ziprasidone

Could a Zap to the Brain Jog Failing Memory?

Posted 20 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 20, 2017 – Can a slight charge of electricity improve an ailing memory? Maybe, according to new research from the University of Pennsylvania. Timed correctly, deep brain stimulation can help people whose memory is lapsing. The treatment can restore the normal flow of "traffic patterns" in the brain, the study authors said. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a procedure that provides a mild electrical stimulation to certain areas of the brain. It is commonly used in people with Parkinson's disease. In DBS, a wire to deliver the stimulation is placed in the brain. The device that generates the charge is usually implanted underneath the collarbone, according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health. "Technology based on this type of stimulation could produce meaningful gains in memory performance," one of the study authors, Daniel Rizzuto, director of cognitive ... Read more

Related support groups: Parkinson's Disease, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation, Lewy Body Dementia

Could Young Blood Boost the Aging Brain?

Posted 19 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 19, 2017 – A new study hints that young blood may harbor clues to a "fountain of youth" for older brains. Researchers say blood from human umbilical cords appears to have helped reverse memory loss in aging mice. The findings suggest that something in young blood is important in maintaining mental acuity. No one, however, is saying that cord blood could be a magic bullet against Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia. For one, any effects seen in elderly rodents may fail to translate to humans. Instead, the findings might set the stage for new drugs that target the dementia process, said study lead author Joseph Castellano. He's an instructor in neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine. "Part of what makes this exciting is that it suggests there's more communication between the blood and brain than we've thought," Castellano said. The study builds on earlier ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation, Lewy Body Dementia

Xanax, Valium May Boost Pneumonia Risk in Alzheimer's Patients

Posted 10 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 10, 2017 – Alzheimer's patients given sedatives such as Valium or Xanax may have an increased risk for pneumonia, a new study warns. People with Alzheimer's disease are often given these drugs, called benzodiazepines, over the long term, the researchers said. Examples of benzodiazepines include alprazolam (Xanax), clonazepam (Klonopin), diazepam (Valium), and lorazepam (Ativan). "An increased risk of pneumonia is an important finding to consider in treatment of patients with Alzheimer disease. Pneumonia often leads to admission to hospital, and patients with dementia are at increased risk of death related to pneumonia," Dr. Heidi Taipale, of Kuopio Research Center of Geriatric Care at the University of Eastern Finland, and co-authors wrote. For the study, the researchers reviewed data from nearly 50,000 Alzheimer's patients in Finland. The patients' average age was 80 and ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Klonopin, Clonazepam, Ativan, Valium, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Diazepam, Pneumonia, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Xanax XR, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Klonopin Wafer, Alprazolam Intensol, Niravam, Diastat, Diastat AcuDial, Valrelease, Diazepam Intensol

Drug Tied to Dementia Risk Overprescribed to Seniors: Study

Posted 31 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 30, 2017 – A drug linked to a raised risk of dementia is taken by millions of older Americans who have an overactive bladder, researchers say. More than one-quarter of patients with the urinary problem had been prescribed the drug oxybutynin (Ditropan), an international team of investigators found. Yet, "oxybutynin is a particularly poor drug for overactive bladder in elderly patients," said study lead author Dr. Daniel Pucheril, a urologist at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. Prior studies have linked the drug to thinking problems and increased risk of dementia in older people, possibly because of the way it affects brain chemicals, he said. "It's a great and effective drug for younger patients, but is a risky drug for older patients," Pucheril said. It boosts dementia risk even when not taken indefinitely, he said. Alternatives exist but they're more expensive and may ... Read more

Related support groups: Overactive Bladder, Dementia, Urinary Incontinence, Oxybutynin, Alzheimer's Disease, Ditropan, Oxytrol, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Gelnique, Ditropan XL, Urotrol, Anturol, Lewy Body Dementia

Vitamin E, Selenium Supplements Won't Curb Men's Dementia Risk

Posted 20 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 20, 2017 – A daily dose of vitamin E or selenium supplements won't keep dementia at bay in older men, new research reveals. "After an average of five years of supplementation, and up to 11 years of follow-up, we did not observe fewer new cases of dementia among men who took any of the supplements compared to neither supplement," said study co-author Frederick Schmitt. He's a professor with the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging and the department of neurology at the University of Kentucky in Lexington. "Based on these results, we do not recommend vitamin E or selenium supplements to prevent dementia at these doses," he added. Approximately 5 million American seniors are now living with Alzheimer's, the study authors noted. Selenium is an essential antioxidant, according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH). It's involved in promoting hormone metabolism, as well as ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Vitamin E, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Selenium, Aquasol E, Alpha E, MTE-7, Vita-Plus E Natural, Pediatrace, Chromic Chloride Hexahydrate/Copper Sulfate/Manganese Sulfate/Selenium/Zinc Sulfate, Multitrace-5, E Pherol, Nutr-E-Sol, E-Gems, MTE-5, Sele-Pak, NeoQ10, Lewy Body Dementia, MTE-6

Dizzy Spells in Middle-Age Tied to Dementia Risk Later

Posted 10 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 10, 2017 – Middle-aged adults who get dizzy when they stand due to a temporary drop in blood pressure may be at increased risk for dementia when they're older, new research suggests. These episodes of sudden low blood pressure – called orthostatic hypotension – may leave lasting damage due to reduced blood flow to the brain, according to researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. For the study, the investigators analyzed data from more than 11,500 adults, average age 54, who were followed for 20 or more years. People with orthostatic hypotension at the outset were 40 percent more likely to develop dementia than others. They also had a 15 percent increased risk of cognitive (mental) decline, the findings showed. However, the study could not prove a cause-and-effect relationship. "Even though these episodes are fleeting, they may have impacts that ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Drug-Induced Dementia

Annual Death Toll From Alzheimer's Nearly Doubles in 15 Years

Posted 7 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 7, 2017 – Alzheimer's disease claims nearly twice as many American lives annually as it did just 15 years ago, a new report shows. "And that's frankly alarming," said Keith Fargo, director of scientific programs and outreach at the Alzheimer's Association, which produced the report. "Now, a lot of people will think it's because we're living longer," he added. "And there is some truth to that. But there's also an assumption that we should just expect to get Alzheimer's disease as we get older. And that's not true. "Most people do not get Alzheimer's, even if they live into their 80s or 90s. It's not normal. It's not something that we should accept. We've definitely got to do something about it," Fargo said. The report also found that more than 5 million American seniors aged 65 and older now live with the memory-robbing disease. That represents approximately 10 percent of ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation, Head Imaging, Lewy Body Dementia

Is Need for More Sleep a Sign of Pending Dementia?

Posted 23 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 – Seniors who begin sleeping more than nine hours a night may face a higher risk of dementia down the road, a new study suggests. The researchers estimated that the risk of dementia grew by almost 2.5 times for those who found themselves recently needing extra sleep. The chances of dementia rose sixfold for people without a high school degree who suddenly needed to sleep nine hours or more, the study contended. The study authors said this finding hinted that education might somehow offer a bit of protection from dementia. People with dementia often suffer from disrupted sleep, "but we don't know much about whether these changes come first," said study co-author Matthew Pase. He's a neurology fellow at the Boston University School of Medicine. Dementia "is by no means a certain fate" in those who find themselves sleeping longer as they age, Pase said. The new ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Sleep Apnea, Drowsiness, Hypersomnia, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Diagnosis and Investigation, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia

Unhealthy in Middle Age, Dementia in Old Age?

Posted 23 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 – Middle-aged men and women at risk for heart disease may also face a higher chance of dementia later in life, a new study suggests. Risk factors such as smoking, high blood pressure and diabetes might boost the odds of dementia almost as much as carrying the gene that raises the risk of Alzheimer's disease, the researchers reported. "Most of these risk factors are treatable or preventable. And it is important to treat these vascular [circulatory system] risk factors starting at least in middle age, if not earlier," said lead researcher Dr. Rebecca Gottesman. She's an associate professor of neurology and epidemiology at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. Know your blood pressure, so it can be treated if it's high. Also, know if you have diabetes, so you can control and treat it. And stop smoking, Gottesman said. "These are important risk factors not only ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Smoking, Heart Disease, Dementia, Smoking Cessation, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Heart Disease, Drug-Induced Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Dementia with Depressive Features

Staying Socially Active Nourishes the Aging Brain

Posted 20 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 20, 2017 – Socializing with lots of relatives and friends may help you stay mentally sharp as you age, a new report co-sponsored by AARP finds. "It's not uncommon for our social networks to shrink in size as we get older," said Marilyn Albert, professor of neurology and director of cognitive neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. "This report provides many helpful suggestions about the things we can do to improve the quality of our relationships with family and friends, which may be beneficial in maintaining our mental abilities," Albert said in an AARP news release. The report also discusses the social benefits of having pets, how age-friendly communities boost social ties, how close relationships benefit both physical and mental health, and how social media (including Facebook and Skype) helps older adults maintain social connections. The report is from ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Performance Anxiety, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Dementia with Depressive Features, Lewy Body Dementia

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