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Legionella Pneumonia News

Drug-Resistant Germs Thrive in America's Corroding Water Systems

Posted 23 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 23, 2016 – The thousands of miles of aging, corroding pipes that bring water to Americans each day may be home to dangerous drug-resistant bacteria, a new report warns. These harmful bacteria include legionella, which causes Legionnaires' disease; pseudomonas, which can trigger pneumonia; and mycobacteria, which can cause tuberculosis and other illnesses, the researchers said. While these bacteria thrive in many environments, they "can [also] live in the pipes; they can survive on tiny amounts of nutrients found in water," explained lead researcher Dr. Jeffrey Griffiths, a professor of public health and medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston. Overall, his team's analysis of 100 million Medicare records found that between 1991 and 2006, more than 617,000 older Americans were hospitalized after falling ill from infection with these three common bacteria ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Tuberculosis, Legionella Pneumonia

Legionnaires' Disease Can Transmit Person-to-Person, Case Suggests

Posted 4 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 3, 2016 – Legionnaires' disease – the respiratory illness that plagued New York City in an outbreak last summer – is typically thought to develop when people breathe in contaminated mist or water droplets. However, a case that occurred in the fall of 2014 in Portugal suggests that the often deadly bacterial infection may, in rare cases, pass person-to-person. One expert in the United States urged caution in interpreting the findings, however. "While this case report sheds new light on a potential concern for person-to-person transmission for Legionnaires' disease, it's important to realize that the primary mode of transmission continues to be via inhalation of infected aerosols from cooling towers associated with large-scale air conditioning and ventilation units," said Dr. Robert Glatter, an emergency physician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. Legionnaires' ... Read more

Related support groups: Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Respiratory Tract Disease, Legionella Pneumonia

NYC Declares Legionnaires' Disease Outbreak Over

Posted 20 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 20, 2015 – The source of the Legionnaires' disease outbreak in New York City has been identified and the outbreak is over, health officials said Thursday. Since July 10, there were 124 cases of the illness in the South Bronx, and 12 of those patients died. The source of the outbreak was the Opera House Hotel cooling tower, officials said in a news release. Strains of Legionella bacteria in samples taken from the hotel's cooling tower matched the strains in patients with the disease, they noted. "We eliminated the danger posed by the Opera House Hotel's cooling tower as soon as it tested positive for disease-causing Legionella. Today, all cooling towers in the affected area have been disinfected, and all cooling towers across the city are being evaluated and disinfected if necessary," Dr. Mary Bassett, commissioner of the city's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, ... Read more

Related support groups: Legionella Pneumonia

Poorly Maintained Plumbing Often Leads to Legionnaires' Disease, CDC Says

Posted 13 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 13, 2015 – As New York City struggles to contain an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease, two new U.S. government reports show the bacteria that causes the potentially deadly illness can take root in a myriad of water sources. Those sources can include poorly maintained hot tubs, water fountains and cooling towers, the researchers said. "The variety of settings and water sources implicated in the Legionella outbreaks reported here highlights the complexity of Legionella control . . . particularly in settings where susceptible persons congregate, such as hospitals, long-term care facilities, and other health-care settings," Karlyn Beer, of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and colleagues wrote. The New York investigation has pinpointed cooling towers used for air conditioning as the source of more than 100 illnesses and 12 deaths in the South Bronx. But ... Read more

Related support groups: Legionella Pneumonia

Two More Deaths Reported in NYC Legionnaires' Disease Outbreak

Posted 10 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 10, 2015 – Two more deaths were reported Monday in the Legionnaires' disease outbreak in New York City. The number of reported cases also increased, from 100 to 113, officials from the New York Department of Mental Health and Hygiene said in a news release. The outbreak has been traced to water-filled cooling towers in the South Bronx. Health experts note that the elderly, smokers and those with respiratory conditions are most vulnerable to the potentially deadly bacteria. New York City health officials said last week that of those who had died, all were older individuals with other medical conditions. "There are probably going to be more cases because the disease has a long incubation period – 10 to 14 days," said Dr. Robert Glatter, an attending physician in the department of emergency medicine at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. Another expert explained that the ... Read more

Related support groups: Respiratory Failure, Legionella Pneumonia

NYC Legionnaires' Disease Outbreak May Be Slowing

Posted 7 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 7, 2015 – The ongoing outbreak of Legionnaires' disease in New York City is showing signs of slowing, city health chief Dr. Mary Bassett said Friday. In a statement, the head of the city's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said that there have been no new deaths, and no new reported cases over the past 24 hours. Ten people have died, and 100 more are known to be infected with Legionnaires' disease, in an outbreak that has been traced to water-filled cooling towers in the South Bronx. However, "we now see the frequency of diagnoses decreasing, as well as the number of emergency department visits for pneumonia in the South Bronx," Bassett said. "We have fewer new cases, people are seeking care promptly and getting treatment promptly," she added. "We're optimistic that we've seen the worst of this outbreak, and that our remediation efforts are having an impact." Health ... Read more

Related support groups: Legionella Pneumonia

Legionnaire's Disease Most Deadly for Frail, Elderly, Experts Say

Posted 6 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 6, 2015 – As New York City health officials work to contain an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease, health experts note that the elderly, smokers and those with respiratory conditions are most vulnerable to the potentially deadly bacteria. So far, 97 people have been infected and eight have died in the current outbreak, which has been traced to cooling towers in a Bronx neighborhood, according to the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Of those who died, all were older individuals with other medical conditions. And the outbreak is not over, experts noted Thursday. "There are probably going to be more cases because the disease has a long incubation period – 10 to 14 days," said Dr. Robert Glatter, an attending physician in the department of emergency medicine at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. Another expert explained that the disease is more ... Read more

Related support groups: Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Respiratory Failure, Legionella Pneumonia

Windshield Washer Fluid May Be Source of Legionnaires' Disease

Posted 20 May 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 19, 2014 – Windshield washer fluid may contain bacteria that cause the deadly form of pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease, according to a new study. Researchers found Legionella bacteria in the windshield washer fluid of 75 percent of school buses they tested in one central Arizona school district. The investigators also discovered that Legionella bacteria can grow in windshield washer fluid and maintain stable populations in the fluid for up to 14 months, according to the study presented May 18 at the American Society for Microbiology's annual meeting. "Washer fluid spray can release potentially dangerous numbers of these bacteria into the air. These results suggest that automobiles may serve as a source of transmission for Legionella infections," study author Otto Schwake, a doctoral student at Arizona State University, said in a society news release. Legionella ... Read more

Related support groups: Legionella Pneumonia

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