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Lead Poisoning - Severe News

Shooting Ranges Pose Hidden Risks: Study

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 14, 2017 – Residue from the firing of lead bullets poses a health risk at shooting ranges, a new study contends. With lead bullets, lead fragments and fumes are discharged at high pressure when a gun is fired. Shooters can breathe in the lead, and particles can stick to their hands and are swallowed when they eat or smoke, the study authors said. Women of childbearing age are at especially high risk because the lead is stored in their bones where it substitutes for calcium. If they become pregnant, their fetus can take in the lead, which may cause serious brain and nerve damage, the scientists said. Women can also pass lead to their infants through breast milk, the researchers added. The review of 36 articles on the topic was published online recently in the journal Environmental Health. Although the health dangers of lead have long been known, little attention has been ... Read more

Related support groups: Lead Poisoning, Lead Poisoning - Mild, Lead Poisoning - Severe

Lead Exposure as Child, Lower IQ as Adult?

Posted 28 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 28, 2017 – Adults who had high levels of lead exposure during childhood may have lower IQs and poorer-paying jobs as adults, a new study suggests. Researchers followed more than 500 New Zealanders from birth in the 1970s to adulthood. When the study began, New Zealand had some of the highest gasoline lead levels in the world. Breathing in leaded gas fumes, or playing with soil near busy roads, could heighten lead exposure since dust particles containing lead comes from car tailpipes, the researchers said. Blood samples of the study participants collected at age 11 were tested for lead. Assessments of thinking and memory skills were also regularly conducted during the study. At age 38, those participants who had more than 10 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood at age 11 had IQs an average of 4.25 points lower than those with lower lead levels as kids. They also had ... Read more

Related support groups: Poisoning, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Lead Poisoning, Lead Poisoning - Mild, Lead Poisoning - Severe

FDA Suggests Limits on Lead in Cosmetics

Posted 23 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 23, 2016 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has suggested setting a limit on how much lead can be in cosmetics ranging from lipstick and eye shadow to blush and shampoo. Although it does not have the authority to enforce such a limit, the FDA recommended in a draft guidance issued Thursday that cosmetics not contain more than 10 parts per million (ppm) of lead. Lead occurs naturally in the environment, but high levels can harm almost every organ in the body. Children and pregnant women are particularly susceptible to its harmful health effects, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In crafting its guidance on lead limits in cosmetics, the FDA tested hundreds of products for lead. "Although most cosmetics on the market in the United States generally already contain less than 10 ppm of lead, a small number contained higher amounts," the FDA said. ... Read more

Related support groups: Poisoning, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Lead Poisoning, Lead Poisoning - Mild, Lead Poisoning - Severe

Some Mexican Ceramics Can Serve Up Lead Poisoning

Posted 20 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 – A charming ceramic reminder of a Mexican vacation could end up giving you lead poisoning, a new study warns. Exposure to high concentrations of lead – often found in glazes that line traditional Mexican ceramics, cookware and dishware – can be toxic after extended periods of handling, Canadian researchers report. The issue has long been on the radar of public health professionals, but was highlighted recently by the lead poisoning of a 55-year-old Canadian woman. She frequently used ceramic dishware picked up in Mexico. "Every time she poured hot water into her mug, lead was seeping out of the glaze and into her tea," explained study lead author Dr. Michael Fralick. He's a general internist at the University of Toronto and a research fellow in pharmacoepidemiology at Harvard University. According to the case report, the woman had been repeatedly hospitalized ... Read more

Related support groups: Poisoning, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Lead Poisoning, Lead Poisoning - Mild, Lead Poisoning - Severe

Flint Water Crisis Taking High Toll on Health, Productivity

Posted 8 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 8, 2016 – The water crisis in Flint, Mich., has cost $395 million in lost productivity, increased welfare use and criminal justice spending, according to a new study. That estimate does not include the $58 million spent on medical care and supplying clean water, wrote Peter Muennig in a letter published in the August issue of the journal Health Affairs. He is a professor of health policy and management at Columbia University in New York City. Flint's water system was contaminated with lead after the city switched its source from Lake Huron to the Flint River in April 2014 to save money. Using U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data, Muennig estimated that Flint, with more than 8,000 cases, accounted for about 5 percent of lead poisonings in the United States between April 2014 and April 2015. According to the CDC, no safe level of lead in children has been ... Read more

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Much-Maligned Pigeon May Be a Lead Detective

Posted 21 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 20, 2016 – Though pigeons are generally considered a city-dwelling nuisance, researchers have found that these "rats of the sky" can be used to monitor levels of lead and other toxic compounds in cities. Blood samples taken from hundreds of sick or injured pigeons in New York City between 2010 and 2015 showed that their lead levels rose in the summer. Those findings correlated to what happened with lead levels in blood samples from children. Zip codes in the city with high lead levels in pigeons also had some of the highest levels of lead in children, the study found. "Pigeons breathe the same air, walk the same sidewalks, and often eat the same food as we do. What if we could use them to monitor possible dangers to our health in the environment, like lead pollution?" said study leader Rebecca Calisi. Calisi, an assistant professor of neurobiology, physiology and ... Read more

Related support groups: Lead Poisoning, Lead Poisoning - Mild, Lead Poisoning - Severe

Health Tip: Keep Lead From Your Home

Posted 8 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Children exposed to even small amounts of lead can face a host of physical and mental development problems. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests these preventive tips: Test your home for lead. If your home was built before 1978, make sure your child cannot reach peeling paint. If you're renovating your older home, children and pregnant women should move out during construction. If you're cleaning up an area with lead, make sure it's carefully closed off from areas where children spend time. Frequently wash your child's toys and hands to help wash away any lead gathered from the home or nearby soil. Take off shoes when re-entering the home, and regularly wet mop floors and wipe down windowsills. Don't let children play in soil. Plant grass or cover with mulch, sand or wood chips. Read more

Related support groups: Lead Poisoning, Lead Poisoning - Mild, Lead Poisoning - Severe

Flint's Lead-Contamination Crisis 'Entirely Preventable'

Posted 24 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 24, 2016 – Analysis of blood samples from young children of Flint, Mich., shows they had much more lead in their blood when the city used local drinking water in an effort to cut costs, a new U.S. government study reveals. A series of blood samples showed kids younger than 6 were nearly 50 percent more likely to have elevated blood lead levels when the city used the Flint River for drinking water instead of the Detroit water system, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention concluded. The percentage of kids with high lead content returned to previous levels once the city switched back to the Detroit system. The reason for the lead contamination? Inappropriate corrosion control measures, investigators said. "This crisis was entirely preventable, and a startling reminder of the critical need to eliminate all sources of lead from our children's ... Read more

Related support groups: Lead Poisoning, Lead Poisoning - Mild, Lead Poisoning - Severe

No Amount of Lead Is Safe for Kids

Posted 20 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 20, 2016 – No amount of lead exposure is safe for children, and stricter regulations are needed to protect youngsters from this serious health threat, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says. There's growing evidence that even low levels of lead exposure previously considered safe can cause permanent mental, behavioral and school problems in children, according to the pediatricians' group. Identifying and eliminating lead sources before exposure occurs is the only reliable way to protect children from this danger, the AAP said. This requires stricter regulations, more federal resources and joint action by government officials and doctors, according to the updated AAP recommendations. "We now know that there is no safe level of blood lead concentration for children, and the best 'treatment' for lead poisoning is to prevent any exposure before it happens," Dr. Jennifer ... Read more

Related support groups: Poisoning, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Lead Poisoning, Lead Poisoning - Mild, Lead Poisoning - Severe

Do Benefits of City Gardening Outweigh Risks?

Posted 17 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 16, 2016 – The benefits of eating fresh vegetables from city gardens appear to outweigh any risks posed by lead or other contaminants in the soil, new research suggests. "People are terrified of soils in urban areas. They always think it's a mystery brew of toxins in the soil, but in the vast majority of cases, the contamination is lead," said study lead author Sally Brown. She is a research associate professor of environmental and forest sciences at the University of Washington, Seattle. "We've shown that lead is harmful by eating the dirt, not from eating the lettuce grown in the dirt," she said in a university news release. It's widely believed that soil contaminated with lead is unsafe for gardening. But other than some root vegetables such as carrots, turnips, radishes and beets, plants take up very little lead into their stems and leaves and are safe to eat, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Poisoning, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Lead Poisoning, Lead Poisoning - Mild, Lead Poisoning - Severe

FDA Warns of Lead Poisoning Risk From Cosmetic Clay

Posted 29 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 29, 2016 – A beauty clay sold at major retail outlets may put users at risk for lead poisoning, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Friday. Alikay Naturals Bentonite Me Baby is sold online and in retail stores, including Target, Amazon.com and Sally Beauty Supply, according to the FDA. Alikay Naturals' website claims that the clay purifies and clarifies both skin and hair. However, FDA lab tests found elevated levels of lead in the clay and consumers should not use the product, the agency said in a news release. Lead can harm the central nervous system, kidneys and immune system. In children, lead exposure can lead to thinking and behavioral problems, the agency added. The FDA said it first learned of the high lead content in the clay from the Minnesota Department of Health, but there have not been any confirmed cases of lead poisoning associated with the clay. ... Read more

Related support groups: Facial Wrinkles, Lead Poisoning, Lead Poisoning - Mild, Lead Poisoning - Severe

Health Tip: Reducing Your Child's Risk of Lead Poisoning

Posted 11 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Lead often is found in the paint in older homes. When ingested by young children, lead can cause serious developmental and health problems. The American Academy of Family Physicians advises: If your home was built before 1978, keep your child away from any areas of peeling paint. Repaint surfaces to make sure any lead paint is sealed in. Talk to your child's pediatrician about lead testing. If you're remodeling an older home, seal off work areas to prevent paint dust from spreading. Make sure your child always washes his or her face and hands before eating. Read more

Related support groups: Poisoning, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Lead Poisoning, Lead Poisoning - Mild, Lead Poisoning - Severe

Old Electronics Potential Source of Lead Exposure in Kids

Posted 10 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 10, 2015 – Working with old or recycled electronics may increase your children's risk for lead poisoning, an expert warns. Lead poisoning in two Ohio toddlers was traced back to their father, who worked at an e-scrap recycling company, said one Cincinnati pediatrician. The dad's job involved crushing cathode ray tubes made from leaded glass. These tubes are a common component of older televisions and computer monitors. The children, aged 1 and 2, were victims of "take-home" lead exposure, Dr. Nick Newman, director of the Environmental Health and Lead Clinic at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, said in a hospital news release. Take-home exposure occurs when toxins from the workplace are carried out on employees' skin, hair, shoes, clothing or other items. The father worked without protective equipment, and often had visible dust in his hair. The family reported ... Read more

Related support groups: Poisoning, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Lead Poisoning, Lead Poisoning - Mild, Lead Poisoning - Severe

Lead Exposure May Be Bigger Threat to Boys Than Girls

Posted 31 Jan 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 30, 2015 – Hormones may explain why lead exposure is less likely to cause brain damage in girls than in boys, researchers report. Specifically, the female hormones estrogen and estradiol may help protect against lead's harmful effects on the frontal areas of the brain, according to the findings published recently in the Journal of Environmental Health. "The study supports existing research suggesting that estrogen and estradiol in females may act as neuroprotectants against the negative impacts of neurotoxins," study author Maya Khanna, a psychology professor at Creighton University, said in a university news release. The study included 40 children. They were between the ages of 3 and 6, and all lived in an area of Omaha considered the largest residential lead clean-up site in the United States. The area has high levels of lead contamination in the soil due to emissions ... Read more

Related support groups: Lead Poisoning, Lead Poisoning - Mild, Lead Poisoning - Severe

On-the-Job Lead Exposures Falling, But Still a Problem: CDC

Posted 30 Jun 2011 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 30 – The number of U.S. workers aged 16 and older with elevated blood lead levels has dropped by more than half over the past two decades – from 14 per 100,000 in 1994 to 6.3 per 100,000 in 2009, a new study reveals. "Although the prevalence of high blood lead levels has decreased, the health effects from lead exposure are well characterized," researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted in an agency news release. They point out that, even though ways to cut on-the-job lead exposures exist, "high blood lead levels persist as almost exclusively an occupational health problem" in the United States today. The analysis of 2008-2009 data from 40 states also showed that elevated blood lead levels were most common among workers in manufacturing (about 72 percent in 2008 and 72.3 percent in 2009), construction (13.2 percent in 2008 and 14.4 percent ... Read more

Related support groups: Lead Poisoning, Lead Poisoning - Mild, Lead Poisoning - Severe

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