Skip to Content

Join the 'Lactation Suppression' group to help and get support from people like you.

Lactation Suppression News

Doctors Should Promote Breast-Feeding to Patients: Panel

Posted 25 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 – Doctors should provide breast-feeding support and guidance to new mothers and pregnant women, an expert panel says. This includes education about the benefits of breast-feeding, encouragement and practical help on how to breast-feed, according to the new U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation. Primary care providers should help women make an informed choice about breast-feeding, the panel said. "Breast-feeding has real health benefits for babies and their mothers. Primary care clinicians can help new moms who breast-feed be successful," said task force member Ann Kurth, dean of the Yale School of Nursing in New Haven, Conn. "Primary care interventions to support breast-feeding are effective in increasing both the number of mothers who breast-feed and how long they breast-feed their babies," she added in a task force news release. Breast-feeding ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Lactation Suppression, Lactation Augmentation, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

What New Moms Need to Know About Pumping Breast Milk

Posted 11 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Sept. 11, 2016 – Breast pumps can be a big help to new mothers, but women who use them need to keep safety in mind, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. Unless breast pumps are designed for multiple users, renting or sharing them can be dangerous – even with family and friends, the agency warns. "Contaminated breast pumps could cause you and your baby to develop an infection," H. Paige Lewter said in an FDA news release. Lewter is an electrical engineer and device reviewer in the FDA's Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices branch. Even if a used pump looks clean, it may still be unsafe. According to Dr. Michael Cummings, an FDA obstetrician-gynecologist, "Potentially infectious particles may survive in the breast pump and/or its accessories for a surprisingly long time." If you do rent or share a multiple-user pump, you must have your own accessories kit – usually ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Lactation Suppression, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Breast-Feeding Rates Climb, But Many Moms Quit Early: CDC

Posted 23 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 23, 2016 – Even though most new moms in the United States begin breast-feeding their babies at birth, many stop sooner than recommended, a new study finds. In 2013, eight out of 10 newborns started out breast-feeding, which shows most mothers want to breast-feed and try to do so, according to the 2016 Breastfeeding Report Card from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But only about half of infants are still breast-feeding at 6 months of age. And fewer than one-third (30.7 percent) are breast-fed at 12 months, the CDC reports. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends breast-feeding exclusively for the first 6 months of life, followed by breast-feeding along with other foods until at least 12 months of age. After that, the academy says breast-feeding can continue as long as mother and baby wish. There are a number of reasons pediatricians say breast is ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Lactation Suppression, Cesarean Section, Lactation Augmentation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Breast Milk Best From the Breast?

Posted 27 May 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 – Infants fed directly from the breast are less likely to develop ear infections than those who are fed pumped breast milk from a bottle, a new study suggests. The study also found that infants who receive breast milk by either method have a lower risk of diarrhea. Researchers studied nearly 500 new mothers and their infants and found that one month of feeding at the breast was associated with a 4 percent lower risk of ear infections. Doing so for six months was associated with a 17 percent lower risk. But compared to babies were were exclusively fed from the breast, the risk of an ear infection rose 14 percent among infants who were bottle-fed pumped breast milk for one month. And that risk climbed to 115 percent among those who received pumped breast milk for six months, according to the study published recently in the Journal of Pediatrics. "While it is not ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Hyperprolactinemia, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Premature Labor, Lactation Suppression, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Breast-Feeding May Not Help Prevent Allergies in Kids, Study Claims

Posted 5 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 5, 2015 – Breast-fed children are just as likely to develop allergies as children who were formula-fed, preliminary new research suggests. But the study, which analyzed medical records from nearly 200 children aged 4 through 18, compared those who were "ever" breast-fed – regardless of duration – with those who had consumed only formula. The results conflict with conventional wisdom indicating that breast-feeding might protect children from a host of infections and other ailments, including allergies. "We think breast-feeding prevents a lot of allergies, but surprisingly, we found that kids [in both groups] had similar numbers of allergies," said study author Dr. Quindelyn Cook, a resident physician in pediatrics at the University of Chicago Medical Center. "Mothers should definitely continue to breast-feed," Cook added. "Definitely this would need to be studied on a ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Delivery, Anaphylaxis, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Lactation Suppression, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Cervical Ripening, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Lactation Augmentation, Allergic Purpura, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Breast-Feeding May Reduce Risk of Aggressive Breast Cancer: Study

Posted 30 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 – A new study finds a link between breast-feeding and a woman's reduced risk for an aggressive form of breast cancer called hormone-receptor-negative breast cancer. This type of cancer accounts for about 20 percent of breast cancer cases in the United States and is more common among women younger than 50, black women and those with the BRCA1 gene mutation, the researchers said. The large international study found that women who breast-fed were up to 20 percent less likely to develop hormone-receptor-negative breast cancer than those who did not breast-feed. Researchers observed an association but they did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship. The findings were published Oct. 26 in the journal Annals of Oncology. "Further evidence to support the long-term protection of breast-feeding against the most aggressive subtypes of breast cancer is very encouraging and ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Lactation Suppression, Lactation Augmentation

Giving Birth, Breast-feeding May Help Women's Long-Term Health

Posted 30 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 – Having babies and breast-feeding may extend a woman's life, new research suggests. Other beneficial factors appear to include starting menstruation at a later age and using birth control pills. Researchers analyzed data from nearly 323,000 women in 10 European countries who were followed for an average of about 13 years. During that time, more than 14,300 of the women died. Nearly 6,000 died of cancer and more than 2,400 from circulatory system diseases. The study found fewer deaths among women who gave birth between the ages of 26 and 30 than among those who were older or who gave birth at age 20 or younger. Women who breast-fed also lived longer than those who did not. The risk of cancer death was lower in women who had given birth than among those who had not, and was lower among those who gave birth to two or three children than among those with one child. ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Emergency Contraception, Menstrual Disorders, Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder, Postcoital Contraception, Period Pain, Premenstrual Syndrome, Delivery, Amenorrhea, Menorrhagia, Dysmenorrhea, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Lactation Suppression, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Lactation Augmentation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Many New Moms Still Lack Breast-Feeding Support at Work

Posted 14 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 – New mothers who return to work while breast-feeding still face significant obstacles, research shows. The study found that less than half of breast-feeding mothers in the United States who return to work receive proper time and space to express breast milk. The investigators also discovered that new mothers who had such access were much more likely to breast-feed for the recommended length of time. "The benefits of breast-feeding are well-documented. Unfortunately, many mothers who wish to continue breast-feeding when they return to work encounter logistical challenges," study lead author Katy Kozhimannil, an associate professor in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota, said in a university news release. "It surprised us that less than half of nursing mothers had access to appropriate workplace accommodations for breast-feeding, ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Lactation Suppression, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Breast-Feeding May Pass Common Chemical to Baby, Study Shows

Posted 21 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2015 – New mothers may inadvertently pass industrial chemicals along to their babies through breast-feeding, which might lower the effectiveness of some childhood vaccinations, researchers report. The class of chemicals, called perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFASs), are widely used in consumer products to make them resistant to water, grease and stains. A Harvard-led research team found that a baby's blood concentration of PFASs will increase by 20 percent to 30 percent every month they're breast-fed. This phenomenon worries study co-author Dr. Philippe Grandjean, because earlier research has shown that PFASs can cause vaccinations to either fail or to be much less potent. "This is absurd. We're trying to prevent diseases by vaccinations, and we also are encouraging mothers to breast-feed because human milk is the ideal nutrition for the child, and the child's ... Read more

Related support groups: Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Lactation Suppression, Lactation Augmentation, Vaccination and Prophlaxis

Breast-Feeding Tied to Healthier Arteries in Middle Age

Posted 8 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 8, 2015 – Young women who breast-feed may have healthier-looking arteries years later, compared with those who bottle-feed their babies, a new study finds. It has long been reported that breast-feeding is the healthiest option for babies. The study, published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology, hints at another potential health benefit from breast-feeding. But researchers also stressed that the findings do not prove cause-and-effect. What the study did show: Of over 800 U.S. women who gave birth at least once, those who breast-fed for a longer period of time had less thickening in the carotid artery wall once they'd reached middle age. The carotid arteries supply blood to the brain, and thickening in the artery wall is considered an early sign of atherosclerosis – the buildup of artery-clogging "plaques" that can lead to heart attack or stroke. Thickening ... Read more

Related support groups: Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Lactation Suppression, Lactation Augmentation

Health Tip: Breast-Feeding Benefits Moms, Too

Posted 17 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Breast-feeding ensures that baby gets all needed nutrients. It also may offer health benefits for mom, too. The American Academy of Family Physicians mentions these potential maternal benefits: Promotes weight loss and helps the uterus return to pre-pregnancy size. Reduces stress. Lowers risk of type 2 diabetes. Lowers risk of ovarian and breast cancers. Reduces risk of depression after pregnancy. Lowers risk of developing osteoporosis and iron-deficiency anemia. Read more

Related support groups: Weight Loss, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Lactation Suppression, Lactation Augmentation

Breast-Feeding May Have Dental Benefits, Study Suggests

Posted 15 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 15, 2015 – The more babies breast-feed, the less likely it is that they will develop any kind of misalignment in their teeth later on, a new study shows. But pacifiers can negate some of that potential benefit, even if the children are breast-feeding, the Australian researchers said. "While most benefits of breast-feeding can be attributed to the breast-milk, this study highlights one of the ways that the actual act of breast-feeding imparts its own benefits," said Dr. Joanna Pierro, a pediatric chief resident at Staten Island University Hospital in New York City. "While it is well established that exclusively breast-fed babies are at a decreased risk of dental malocclusion [misalignment], this study revealed the differences between those exclusively breast-fed versus those who are predominantly breast-fed," said Pierro, who was not involved in the study. "Since many ... Read more

Related support groups: Oral and Dental Conditions, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Lactation Suppression, Prevention of Dental Caries, Lactation Augmentation

Breast-feeding May Lower Risk of Childhood Leukemia: Study

Posted 1 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 1, 2015 – Breast-feeding – even for a short time – may lower a baby's later risk of childhood leukemia, a new study suggests. The researchers found that babies breast-fed for at least six months appear to have a 19 percent lower risk of childhood leukemia compared to children who were never breast-fed or were breast-fed for fewer months. "Breast-feeding is a highly accessible and low-cost preventive public health measure that has been found in numerous studies to be associated not only with lower risk for childhood leukemia but also with lower risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), gastrointestinal infection, ear infection, type 2 diabetes and obesity later in life," said the study's lead author, Efrat Amitay, of the School of Public Health at the University of Haifa in Israel. "There is, therefore, a distinct public benefit in breast-feeding and it should be ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Lactation Suppression, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Breast Conditions

Related Drug Support Groups

Clomid, clomiphene, Serophene, Milophene