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Related terms: Breast Milk Insufficiency, Lactation Insufficiency

Breast-Feed Now, Stave Off Diabetes Later

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 16, 2018 – It's often said breast-feeding is best for babies, but new research suggests it also might have a significant long-term benefit for moms – preventing type 2 diabetes. "We found that a longer duration of breast-feeding was associated with a substantially lower risk of type 2 diabetes in women," said lead study author Erica Gunderson. In fact, women who breast-fed more than six months had about half the risk for type 2 diabetes as did women who never breast-fed, according to Gunderson. She is an epidemiologist and senior research scientist with Kaiser Permanente Northern California's division of research in Oakland. In babies, breast-feeding has been linked to a reduced risk for infections, type 1 and type 2 diabetes, some cancers and childhood overweight and obesity. In mothers, breast-feeding helps return to pre-pregnancy weight and decrease postpartum blood ... Read more

Related support groups: Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation

Health Tip: How to Clean a Breast Pump

Posted 27 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Women who use a breast pump should make sure the device is well cleaned to prevent contamination. Breast pumps are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The agency suggests how to clean the device: As soon as possible after pumping, wash each piece separately using liquid dishwashing soap and plenty of warm water. Rinse each piece thoroughly with hot water for 10 to 15 seconds. Place the pieces on a clean paper towel or in a clean drying rack and allow them to air dry. Read more

Related support groups: Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation

Prolonged Breast-Feeding May Guard Against Teen Eczema

Posted 13 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 13, 2017 – Encouraging new mothers to stick with breast-feeding may halve the already small risk that infants will develop eczema when they hit their teens, new research suggests. And while the study also found no impact on teenage asthma risk, at least one U.S. pediatrician said other studies have supported the role of breast-feeding in potentially cutting a child's risk of developing allergies or asthma. The new findings stem from an ongoing investigation tracking some of the protective benefits of breast-feeding among infants reared in the eastern European country of Belarus. The study didn't compare mothers who did not breast-feed with those who did, and it didn't prove a cause-and-effect link between prolonged breast-feeding and eczema or asthma risk. Rather, researchers looked at how infants fared down the road when mothers participated in a program that encouraged ... Read more

Related support groups: Eczema, Dermatitis, Contact Dermatitis, Atopic Dermatitis, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation

Health Tip: Supporting Breast-feeding Moms on the Job

Posted 3 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

-- There are a number of options available if businesses want to make it more convenient for mothers to express breast milk at work. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services suggests: Find a devoted space for nursing mothers. If a mother has a safe and private place to pump, she will not have to go elsewhere, such as a car or home. This space requires a comfortable chair, a place for a breast pump and an electrical outlet. If you do not have room for a dedicated area, consider sharing space with other nearby businesses. Many women have their own breast pumps, since insurance plans often cover them. But some businesses buy hospital-grade pumps for employees. These devices may speed up the pumping process and prevent the need for a mother to carry a pump back and forth from home. Ensure that there is adequate refrigeration for nursing mothers. Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation

Even Partial Breast-Feeding for First Few Months Lowers SIDS Risk

Posted 31 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 31, 2017 – New research confirms that breast-feeding for two to four months of a newborn's life can significantly reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). But the study also found moms don't need to breast-feed exclusively to reap that benefit. Even partial breast-feeding will do, the 20-region study found. "What is, perhaps, surprising is that there does not appear to be any benefit of exclusive breast-feeding over partial breast-feeding in relation to SIDS, though there are many other benefits associated with exclusive breast-feeding," explained study author John Thompson, from New Zealand's University of Auckland. The analysis included research from eight major international studies. The researchers reviewed over 2,200 SIDS case patients and over 6,800 "control" infants. There was great variability in the rates of any breast-feeding and exclusive ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation

Breast-Feeding Bond Lingers for Mom

Posted 31 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 31, 2017 – The longer a new mom breast-feeds, the stronger her maternal bond may be with her child years later, a new study suggests. The 10-year study of nearly 1,300 families in the United States found that women who breast-fed their children longer had more maternal sensitivity well past their children's infant and toddler years. New moms in the study breast-fed for an average of 17 weeks. Fewer than 1 percent breast-fed for 2 years and 29 percent didn't breast-feed at all, the study found. Researchers then interviewed and videotaped families in their homes periodically until their child turned 11. Maternal sensitivity includes a mother's responsiveness to her child, her emotional tone, her flexibility in her behavior and her ability to read her child's cues. "It was surprising to us that breast-feeding duration predicted change over time in maternal sensitivity," said ... Read more

Related support groups: Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation

Ob/Gyns Warn Against 'Vaginal Seeding' Trend for Newborns

Posted 25 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 25, 2017 – The U.S.'s leading group of obstetricians and gynecologists is warning against a new trend where babies born by C-section are "seeded" via cotton swabs with vaginal microbes from the mother. "Vaginal seeding" is growing in popularity because it's thought that babies born through Cesarean-section miss out on certain "helpful" vaginal microbes that might shield the infant from asthma, allergies and immune disorders. "Vaginal seeding has become a rising trend for patients," noted Dr. Jennifer Wu, an ob/gyn at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "Patients read about the benefits of a vaginal delivery and hope to replicate these benefits with vaginal seeding." As explained by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), it's thought that contact with healthy vaginal bacteria helps stimulate the infant immune system, prevents the growth of ... Read more

Related support groups: Herpes Simplex, Delivery, Premature Labor, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Diagnosis and Investigation, Labor Pain, Streptococcal Infection, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation

Breast Milk May Arrive Late for Obese New Moms

Posted 24 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 24, 2017 – While obesity in pregnancy has long been linked to a higher risk for complications during childbirth, there's now another reason to avoid it: a late start to breast milk production. That's the finding from a new study of more than 200 women with newborns who planned to breast-feed. The researchers found that delays in "lactogenesis" – the production of breast milk within three days of delivery – "occurred more frequently among women who were obese at the time of delivery." The study highlights an issue many new moms have to deal with, said one pediatrician who reviewed the new study. "Breast-feeding is hard for all mothers," said Dr. Sophia Jan, who directs pediatrics at Cohen Children's Medical Center in New Hyde Park, N.Y. "This study found that breast-feeding is even harder for mothers who were obese prior to pregnancy." There are potential consequences ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Induction, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation

IUD Won't Interfere With Breast-Feeding

Posted 22 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 22, 2017 – Women who have a hormonal intrauterine device (IUD) implanted immediately after childbirth can still breast-feed, according to a new study. There's no reason for women to delay using this type of birth control after having a baby, researchers advised. "Bottom line: Early placement of a hormonal IUD is a safe, long-term birth control method that doesn't negatively affect women who want to breast-feed their baby," study first author Dr. David Turok said in a University of Utah news release. Turok is an associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology. For the study, researchers randomly divided more than 250 women into two groups. One group received a hormonal IUD within 30 minutes of giving birth. The other group received a hormonal IUD between four and 12 weeks after delivery. The study found that the hormones in the IUD did not delay lactation among the new ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Plan B, Depo-Provera, Nexplanon, Mirena, NuvaRing, Provera, Sprintec, Implanon, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Tri-Sprintec, Yasmin, Plan B One-Step, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, TriNessa, Mononessa, Lutera

Can Breast Milk Feed a Love of Vegetables?

Posted 4 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 4, 2017 – Want your preschooler to eat veggies without a fuss? Try eating veggies while you're breast-feeding. That's the message from a new study of lactating mothers and their breast-fed babies. The study found that those infants who took in veggie-flavored breast-milk were less likely to turn away from similar-tasting cereal when they graduated to more solid food. "Every baby's sensory experience is unique, but the flavor of their first food, beginning in utero, is dependent on what mom is eating," said Julie Mennella. She is a biopsychologist at the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia, and led the study. "The way I see it is: Mother's milk is the ultimate in precision medicine," Mennella said. When an expectant mother eats vegetables, they flavor her amniotic fluid – and later, her breast-milk – and those flavors get passed along to her baby. As a result, ... Read more

Related support groups: Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation

Breast-Feeding Lowers Mom's Breast Cancer Risk: Study

Posted 1 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 1, 2017 – Breast-feeding helps protect women against breast cancer, a new report finds. Of the 18 studies analyzed by the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR), 13 found the risk of breast cancer dropped 2 percent for every five months a woman breast-fed. The report, updating global science on breast cancer, also found that breast-fed babies are less likely to gain excess weight as they grow, which could reduce their cancer risk later in life. In adults, being overweight or obese increases the risk for 11 common cancers, according to the AICR. "It isn't always possible for moms to breast-feed but for those who can, know that breast-feeding can offer cancer protection for both the mother and the child," said Alice Bender, director of nutrition programs for the institute. Breast-feeding is protective in several ways, according to the report. It may delay return of a ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Breast Cancer, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Lactation Suppression, Lactation Augmentation

Health Tip: Getting Toddlers to Try New Foods

Posted 13 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Getting toddlers to try new foods may seem like an uphill battle. But experts say parents mustn't give up. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics suggests: The foods you eat may affect the taste of your breast milk. So if you breast-feed, eat a variety of foods. For both you and your child, minimize salt and skip spicy flavors, such as hot sauce or cayenne pepper. If your child doesn't like a food at first, keep offering it. Your child may eventually grow to like it. Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation

Breast-Feeding May Lower Risk of MS, Study Says

Posted 12 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 12, 2017 – Women with a longer history of breast-feeding may be less likely to develop multiple sclerosis than mothers who skip breast-feeding or nurse for briefer periods, a new study suggests. Researchers compared nearly 400 women with MS or its precursor, known as clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), with a similar healthy group. They found that mothers who had breast-fed one or more children for a total of 15 months or longer were 53 percent less likely to develop MS or CIS than those with zero to four months of total breast-feeding. "No one has shown before that breast-feeding could have a prolonged benefit on the mother's immune system," said study author Dr. Annette Langer-Gould. She's a research scientist in neurology at Kaiser Permanente in Pasadena, Calif. "This is one more piece of evidence that women who want to breast-feed should be supported to do so," ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Multiple Sclerosis, Delivery, Chronic Spasticity, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Spasticity, Cesarean Section, Upper Limb Spasticity, Lower Limb Spasticity, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Spinal Spasticity, Lactation Augmentation

Breast-Feeding Tied to Lower Heart, Stroke Risk for Mom

Posted 22 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 21, 2017 – Women who breast-feed their babies may have a slightly lower risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke decades later, a large new study suggests. Researchers found that among nearly 290,000 women in China, those who breast-fed were 10 percent less likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke later in life, versus women who bottle-fed their babies. How might breast-feeding help heart health? One theory holds that breast-feeding helps "reset" a woman's metabolism after pregnancy, according to lead researcher Sanne Peters. She's a research fellow in epidemiology at the University of Oxford in England. The study pointed out that women who breast-feed for a longer time tend to have lower odds of high blood pressure and diabetes, for example. Dr. Nieca Goldberg, is a spokesperson for the American Heart Association. She said it's possible that women who breast-feed ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Lactation Suppression, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation

Breast-Feeding May Reduce Pain From C-Section

Posted 4 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, June 3, 2017 – Breast-feeding for a longer time may help women reduce the risk of chronic pain after a cesarean delivery, a new study suggests. Researchers from Spain followed 185 women who had a C-section. Almost one-quarter (23 percent) of those who breast-fed for two months or less still had chronic pain in the surgical site four months after delivery. But just 8 percent of those who breast-fed for two months or longer reported chronic pain. "These preliminary results suggest that breast-feeding for more than two months protects against chronic post-cesarean pain, with a threefold increase in the risk of chronic pain if breast-feeding is only maintained for two months or less," wrote the researchers led by Dr. Carmen Alicia Vargas Berenjeno from Our Lady of Valme University Hospital in Seville. "Our study provides another good reason to encourage women to breast-feed," ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation

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