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Related terms: Breast Milk Insufficiency, Lactation Insufficiency

IUD Won't Interfere With Breast-Feeding

Posted 22 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 22, 2017 – Women who have a hormonal intrauterine device (IUD) implanted immediately after childbirth can still breast-feed, according to a new study. There's no reason for women to delay using this type of birth control after having a baby, researchers advised. "Bottom line: Early placement of a hormonal IUD is a safe, long-term birth control method that doesn't negatively affect women who want to breast-feed their baby," study first author Dr. David Turok said in a University of Utah news release. Turok is an associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology. For the study, researchers randomly divided more than 250 women into two groups. One group received a hormonal IUD within 30 minutes of giving birth. The other group received a hormonal IUD between four and 12 weeks after delivery. The study found that the hormones in the IUD did not delay lactation among the new ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Plan B, Mirena, Nexplanon, Depo-Provera, Provera, NuvaRing, Sprintec, Implanon, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Tri-Sprintec, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Yasmin, Plan B One-Step, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, TriNessa, Lutera, Mononessa

Can Breast Milk Feed a Love of Vegetables?

Posted 4 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 4, 2017 – Want your preschooler to eat veggies without a fuss? Try eating veggies while you're breast-feeding. That's the message from a new study of lactating mothers and their breast-fed babies. The study found that those infants who took in veggie-flavored breast-milk were less likely to turn away from similar-tasting cereal when they graduated to more solid food. "Every baby's sensory experience is unique, but the flavor of their first food, beginning in utero, is dependent on what mom is eating," said Julie Mennella. She is a biopsychologist at the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia, and led the study. "The way I see it is: Mother's milk is the ultimate in precision medicine," Mennella said. When an expectant mother eats vegetables, they flavor her amniotic fluid – and later, her breast-milk – and those flavors get passed along to her baby. As a result, ... Read more

Related support groups: Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation

Breast-Feeding Lowers Mom's Breast Cancer Risk: Study

Posted 1 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 1, 2017 – Breast-feeding helps protect women against breast cancer, a new report finds. Of the 18 studies analyzed by the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR), 13 found the risk of breast cancer dropped 2 percent for every five months a woman breast-fed. The report, updating global science on breast cancer, also found that breast-fed babies are less likely to gain excess weight as they grow, which could reduce their cancer risk later in life. In adults, being overweight or obese increases the risk for 11 common cancers, according to the AICR. "It isn't always possible for moms to breast-feed but for those who can, know that breast-feeding can offer cancer protection for both the mother and the child," said Alice Bender, director of nutrition programs for the institute. Breast-feeding is protective in several ways, according to the report. It may delay return of a ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Breast Cancer, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Lactation Suppression, Lactation Augmentation

Health Tip: Getting Toddlers to Try New Foods

Posted 13 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Getting toddlers to try new foods may seem like an uphill battle. But experts say parents mustn't give up. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics suggests: The foods you eat may affect the taste of your breast milk. So if you breast-feed, eat a variety of foods. For both you and your child, minimize salt and skip spicy flavors, such as hot sauce or cayenne pepper. If your child doesn't like a food at first, keep offering it. Your child may eventually grow to like it. Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Lactation Augmentation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Breast-Feeding May Lower Risk of MS, Study Says

Posted 12 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 12, 2017 – Women with a longer history of breast-feeding may be less likely to develop multiple sclerosis than mothers who skip breast-feeding or nurse for briefer periods, a new study suggests. Researchers compared nearly 400 women with MS or its precursor, known as clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), with a similar healthy group. They found that mothers who had breast-fed one or more children for a total of 15 months or longer were 53 percent less likely to develop MS or CIS than those with zero to four months of total breast-feeding. "No one has shown before that breast-feeding could have a prolonged benefit on the mother's immune system," said study author Dr. Annette Langer-Gould. She's a research scientist in neurology at Kaiser Permanente in Pasadena, Calif. "This is one more piece of evidence that women who want to breast-feed should be supported to do so," ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Multiple Sclerosis, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Chronic Spasticity, Spasticity, Upper Limb Spasticity, Cesarean Section, Lower Limb Spasticity, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation, Spinal Spasticity

Breast-Feeding Tied to Lower Heart, Stroke Risk for Mom

Posted 22 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 21, 2017 – Women who breast-feed their babies may have a slightly lower risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke decades later, a large new study suggests. Researchers found that among nearly 290,000 women in China, those who breast-fed were 10 percent less likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke later in life, versus women who bottle-fed their babies. How might breast-feeding help heart health? One theory holds that breast-feeding helps "reset" a woman's metabolism after pregnancy, according to lead researcher Sanne Peters. She's a research fellow in epidemiology at the University of Oxford in England. The study pointed out that women who breast-feed for a longer time tend to have lower odds of high blood pressure and diabetes, for example. Dr. Nieca Goldberg, is a spokesperson for the American Heart Association. She said it's possible that women who breast-feed ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Lactation Suppression, Lactation Augmentation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Breast-Feeding May Reduce Pain From C-Section

Posted 4 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, June 3, 2017 – Breast-feeding for a longer time may help women reduce the risk of chronic pain after a cesarean delivery, a new study suggests. Researchers from Spain followed 185 women who had a C-section. Almost one-quarter (23 percent) of those who breast-fed for two months or less still had chronic pain in the surgical site four months after delivery. But just 8 percent of those who breast-fed for two months or longer reported chronic pain. "These preliminary results suggest that breast-feeding for more than two months protects against chronic post-cesarean pain, with a threefold increase in the risk of chronic pain if breast-feeding is only maintained for two months or less," wrote the researchers led by Dr. Carmen Alicia Vargas Berenjeno from Our Lady of Valme University Hospital in Seville. "Our study provides another good reason to encourage women to breast-feed," ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Cesarean Section, Labor Pain, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation

Hospital 'Baby Boxes' May Help Prevent SIDS in Newborns

Posted 26 May 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 – Child care experts say it's dangerous for infants to sleep in the same bed with their parents. Now, researchers report that "baby boxes" and parent education can help reduce the unsafe practice. Bed-sharing is linked with sleep-related deaths in babies, including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), and accidental suffocation and strangulation, according to background information with this study. For the study, researchers at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia recruited more than 2,700 new mothers. Half were instructed face-to-face about safe infant sleep and given a baby box (a cardboard bassinet) with a firm mattress. The other half received only standard nursing discharge instructions with information about safe infant sleep. The combination of baby box and face-to-face instructions reduced the rate of bed-sharing by 25 percent during infants' first ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Lactation Augmentation

Health Tip: Storing Breast Milk Safely

Posted 22 May 2017 by Drugs.com

-- If you've pumped breast milk, you'll want to store it properly so it's safe to drink at the next feeding. The Mayo Clinic offers these guidelines: Always wash hands carefully with soap and water. Choose a clean container that's made of glass or BPA-free plastic, or storage bags made for breast milk. Write the date that you expressed the milk on the container, and your baby's name if storing outside your home. Use waterproof label and marker. Store milk in the back of the refrigerator, where the temperature is coldest. It will stay safe for up to 5 days before you should use or freeze it. You can also store breast milk in the freezer. Use it within 6 months. Store enough milk in a single container for one feeding. If freezing, allow extra room for milk to expand. Read more

Related support groups: Lactation Augmentation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Another Reason to Breast-Feed: It's Good for Baby's Belly

Posted 8 May 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 8, 2017 – Mothers have been told for years that breast-feeding is best. Now researchers say they've found a new way it helps babies – by planting good bacteria in their digestive system. For the study, the researchers assessed 107 breast-feeding mother-infant pairs. The investigators found that 30 percent of beneficial bacteria in a baby's intestinal tract comes directly from the mother's milk, and 10 percent comes from skin on the mother's breast. "Breast milk is this amazing liquid that, through millions of years of evolution, has evolved to make babies healthy, particularly their immune systems," said senior study author Grace Aldrovandi. She is a professor of pediatrics and chief of infectious diseases at UCLA's Mattel Children's Hospital. "Our research identifies a new mechanism that contributes to building stronger, healthier babies," she explained in a UCLA news ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Induction, Postpartum Bleeding, Cesarean Section, Labor Pain, Lactation Augmentation, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Breast-Feeding Success Hinges on Support for Mom, Baby

Posted 12 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 – Information and support can help new mothers overcome breast-feeding difficulties, a lactation expert says. A pregnant woman should tell her partner and family about her breast-feeding goals and why they're important to her, said Dr. Nicole Hackman. She's a pediatrician and medical director for lactation services at Penn State Children's Hospital, in Hershey. New mothers "will need to rely on that support during the challenging days," she said in a hospital news release. It's important for the mother and baby to have skin-to-skin contact for the first hour after birth, she said. "Not only does that regulate the baby's heart rate, temperature and glucose level, but it can help the baby latch on and have the first breast-feeding session," Hackman said. She said it's also a good idea to limit visitors during a baby's first week of life. That gives mother and baby ... Read more

Related support groups: Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Lactation Suppression, Lactation Augmentation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Breast-Feeding May Not Lead to Smarter Preschoolers

Posted 27 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 27, 2017 – Breast-feeding may not make kids sharper or better behaved than their non-nursed peers over the long-term, a new study suggests. Breast-feeding is known to have many positive effects for babies and moms. But the notion that it makes kids smarter or better able to regulate their behavior is unproven. "The belief that babies who are breast-fed have advantages in their cognitive development, in particular, has been a topic of debate for over a century now," said Lisa-Christine Girard, the lead researcher on the new study. Her team found that 3- and 5-year-olds who'd been breast-fed did, in fact, score higher on tests of vocabulary and problem-solving. The children also typically had fewer behavioral issues, based on parents' ratings. But most of those connections seemed to be explained by other factors – such as the mothers' education and the family's social ... Read more

Related support groups: Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation

Health Tip: Washing Baby Bottles

Posted 10 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Your baby is already at heightened risk of infection, so why compound the problem with poorly-washed bottles? The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends: Place bottles, caps, nipples and related supplies in a clean sink filled with hot, soapy water. Use a bottle brush to thoroughly wash the inside and outside of each bottle, then rinse under running water. Wash the nipples and rings with a nipple brush, and make sure to squeeze the hot, soapy water through the nipples to wash away trapped milk. Rinse under running water. Remove other bottle accessories using sanitized tongs, rinse them well and let them dry in a dish drainer. Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy

Lingering Baby Weight? Don't Blame the Pregnancy

Posted 17 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 17, 2017 – Women have long blamed pregnancy for weight gains that linger after their babies are born, but a new study suggests the demands of motherhood might be to blame. "We found that by one or two years after birth, women who had children were very similar [in weight gain] to those who did not," said lead researcher Olga Yakusheva. She is an associate professor of nursing at the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor. However, "from that time on, women with children were gaining weight at a faster rate than women without," she added. Yakusheva has a theory, which wasn't tested or proven in the study, about why. "Mothers tend to put the needs of their children first, so they might not be exercising or taking care of themselves," she said in a statement. "It might also be little things like finishing the food on their child's plate or spending more time sitting with their ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Delivery, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Labor Pain, Lactation Augmentation, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Most Cow's Milk Baby Formulas Don't Up Risk of Type 1 Diabetes

Posted 19 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2017 – Although breast milk is still considered the best nutrition for babies, a new study suggests that most cow's milk formulas don't increase the risk of developing type 1 diabetes. However, the German researchers who did the study did find that giving highly hydrolyzed formulas – sometimes recommended for babies with food allergies – in the first week of life may increase the chances of type 1 diabetes in some children. "There is no benefit for infants at increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes to be fed hydrolyzed infant formula as a first formula if breast-feeding is not possible," said lead author Sandra Hummel, from the Institute of Diabetes Research in Munich. The study wasn't designed to prove a cause-and-effect relationship between cow's milk baby formula and the development of autoantibodies that can trigger type 1 diabetes. And it's important to ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Diabetes, Type 1, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Cesarean Section, Lactation Augmentation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

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