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Labor Pain News

Hospital Midwives, Lower C-Section Rates?

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 16, 2017 – Expectant mothers seeking to lower their risk of a cesarean delivery might want to consider getting a midwife involved, a new study suggests. In addition, midwives were tied to less need for a surgical incision called an episiotomy during childbirth, the researchers reported. "More midwife-attended births may correlate with fewer obstetric procedures, which could lower costs without lowering the quality of care," wrote study co-authors Laura Attanasio, of the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and Katy Kozhimannil of the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. The study findings are based on 126 hospitals in New York state. About 25 percent of those hospitals had no midwives. About half had midwives, but they attended less than 15 percent of births. At 7 percent of the hospitals, however, midwives attended more than four out of 10 births, according ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Induction, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Pain, Cervical Ripening, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Ob/Gyns Warn Against 'Vaginal Seeding' Trend for Newborns

Posted 25 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 25, 2017 – The U.S.'s leading group of obstetricians and gynecologists is warning against a new trend where babies born by C-section are "seeded" via cotton swabs with vaginal microbes from the mother. "Vaginal seeding" is growing in popularity because it's thought that babies born through Cesarean-section miss out on certain "helpful" vaginal microbes that might shield the infant from asthma, allergies and immune disorders. "Vaginal seeding has become a rising trend for patients," noted Dr. Jennifer Wu, an ob/gyn at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "Patients read about the benefits of a vaginal delivery and hope to replicate these benefits with vaginal seeding." As explained by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), it's thought that contact with healthy vaginal bacteria helps stimulate the infant immune system, prevents the growth of ... Read more

Related support groups: Herpes Simplex, Delivery, Premature Labor, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Pain, Diagnosis and Investigation, Streptococcal Infection, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation

Breast Milk May Arrive Late for Obese New Moms

Posted 24 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 24, 2017 – While obesity in pregnancy has long been linked to a higher risk for complications during childbirth, there's now another reason to avoid it: a late start to breast milk production. That's the finding from a new study of more than 200 women with newborns who planned to breast-feed. The researchers found that delays in "lactogenesis" – the production of breast milk within three days of delivery – "occurred more frequently among women who were obese at the time of delivery." The study highlights an issue many new moms have to deal with, said one pediatrician who reviewed the new study. "Breast-feeding is hard for all mothers," said Dr. Sophia Jan, who directs pediatrics at Cohen Children's Medical Center in New Hyde Park, N.Y. "This study found that breast-feeding is even harder for mothers who were obese prior to pregnancy." There are potential consequences ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Induction, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Lactation Augmentation

Incision Length Linked to Pain After Cesarean

Posted 23 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Oct. 21, 2017 – How much pain a woman feels after cesarean delivery may depend on the length of the incision, a new study suggests. Researchers assessed pain in nearly 700 women who gave birth via elective C-sections. Both short and long surgical incisions were linked to greater pain. Based on their findings, the researchers concluded that the ideal length of a C-section incision is between roughly 4.5 and 6.5 inches. They said shorter and longer incisions should be avoided when possible. Women in the study were followed for up to 12 months. Those with short incisions were more likely to report higher pain scores immediately after delivery, which likely indicates intense tissue stretching during delivery, the researchers said. Women with long incisions were also more likely to report higher pain scores, including increased sensitivity to pain around the surgical incision. "To ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Delivery, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Lying Down After an Epidural: A Smart Idea?

Posted 19 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 19, 2017 – Lying down after an epidural increases a first-time mother's chances of having a normal birth, a new study suggests. With an epidural, a tube is inserted into a space below the spinal cord, and small doses of painkillers can be given during childbirth. More than 50 percent of U.S. women in labor have an epidural for pain relief, according to the American Pregnancy Association. But having an epidural increases the risk of having to use instruments – such as forceps or suction – during childbirth. It's been suggested that lying down after receiving an epidural may improve the likelihood of a spontaneous birth, the British researchers said. To investigate that theory, the study authors looked at nearly 3,100 first-time mothers in British hospitals. The women 16 and older, and received a low-dose epidural while in labor. About half laid down afterwards, while ... Read more

Related support groups: Anesthesia, Delivery, Labor Induction, Labor Pain, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Study Debunks Notion That Epidurals Prolong Labor

Posted 11 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 10, 2017 – Epidurals are a popular form of pain control for women during labor, but they've long been blamed for hindering progress in the delivery room. However, new research challenges this widely held belief, suggesting that epidurals have no effect on how long labor lasts – or when babies are born. "We found that exchanging the epidural anesthetic with a [non-drug] saline placebo made no difference in the duration of the second stage of labor," said study lead researcher Dr. Philip Hess. He directs obstetric anesthesia at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. Dr. Jennifer Wu, an ob/gyn who reviewed the new findings, said there are "important aspects to this study." Use of "low-dose epidurals versus placebos during the pushing stage of labor did not increase duration of pushing" or the need for a C-section, said Wu, who works at Lenox Hill Hospital in New ... Read more

Related support groups: Anesthesia, Delivery, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Same Pregnancy Meds Can Cost $200 -- or $11,000

Posted 3 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 3, 2017 – The same medication to prevent preterm birth can cost $200 – or nearly $11,000, a new study finds. Harvard Medical School researchers found that use of a brand name and prepackaging was associated with a 5,000 percent increase in the cost of the synthetic hormone progestin. They said the average per-pregnancy cost of a compounded, made-to-order form of the medication known as 17P was $206. That compared with $10,917 for a brand-name prepackaged version of the same medication. "Everyone is talking about how to pay for health care, but few talk about why health care in the United States is so expensive. Uncontrollable drug prices are a major cause of this trend," study co-author Andrew Beam said in a Harvard news release. He's an instructor of biomedical informatics. The two medications have the same active ingredients and are clinically interchangeable, ... Read more

Related support groups: Progesterone, Delivery, Prometrium, Premature Labor, Crinone, Labor Pain, Cervical Ripening, Endometrin, Progest, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Cyclogest, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Progesterone Topical, Prochieve, Progestasert System, Gestone

Study Questions Practice of Placenta Eating by New Moms

Posted 29 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 29, 2017 – You may have heard that some new mothers choose to eat their own placenta after childbirth. But there's no indication the trendy practice offers any health benefits, and some evidence it could prove dangerous, new research suggests. After reviewing dozens of studies from across the globe on so-called placentophagy, or placenta consumption, the researchers say they're advising obstetricians to discourage their patients from eating the placenta in any form. "As obstetricians, it's important to tell the truth. And the truth is it's potentially harmful and no evidence it's beneficial, so therefore, don't do it," said study author Dr. Amos Grunebaum. He's an obstetrician/gynecologist at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City. "Over the last few years, we've had an increasing demand from patients who wanted to take their placenta home ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Induction, Postpartum Bleeding, Labor Pain, Cervical Ripening, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Heart-Lung Fitness Challenged in Early Full-Term Babies

Posted 28 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 27, 2017 – Infants born early in a full-term pregnancy have a higher risk of poor heart-lung fitness later in life, a new study suggests. The study included nearly 800 people in Northern Ireland who were born at full-term (37 to 42 weeks) and had their cardiorespiratory fitness assessed at ages 12, 15 and 22. Those born at 37 to 38 weeks had a 57 percent higher risk of poor heart-lung fitness when they were teens and young adults compared to those born between 39 and 42 weeks. Each extra week of full-term pregnancy was associated with a 14 percent reduced risk, the Australian researchers reported. Diet, physical activity and smoking behavior did not affect the findings, according to the study published Sept. 27 in the Journal of the American Heart Association. "We believe that earlier births – even within the at-term range – may interrupt normal development and lead ... Read more

Related support groups: Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Delivery, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Premature Labor, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Labor Induction, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Respiratory Tract Disease, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Does Immune System Hold Clues to Preterm Births?

Posted 1 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 1, 2017 – By learning more about the immune system changes that occur during pregnancy, scientists hope they can someday predict if babies will be born prematurely. "Pregnancy is a unique immunological state. We found that the timing of immune system changes follows a precise and predictable pattern in normal pregnancy," said study senior author Dr. Brice Gaudilliere. He's an assistant professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine in California. If scientists can identify immune-system changes predicting premature birth, they say they might eventually develop a blood test to detect it. "Ultimately, we want to be able to ask, 'Does your immune clock of pregnancy run too slow or too fast?'" Gaudilliere said in a university news release. Nearly 10 percent of U.S. infants are born three or more weeks early. Currently, ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Does Race Matter in Care 'Preemie' Babies Receive?

Posted 28 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 28, 2017 – Race and ethnicity can make a difference in the quality of care a premature baby receives in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), a new study finds. Top-quality hospitals in California tend to deliver better care to white babies compared with black or Hispanic newborns, researchers report. In addition, black and Hispanic infants are more likely than white newborns to receive care at poor-quality NICUs, the study found. While these trends are real, they were not present across the board, the researchers added. Some California hospitals provided better care to minority babies than white infants, for example. The disparities in care are caused by many social, economic and organizational factors in the hospital and its surrounding community, said lead researcher Dr. Jochen Profit. He's an associate professor of pediatrics with the Stanford University School of ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Good Diet, Exercise While Pregnant Could Cut C-section Risk

Posted 20 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 19, 2017 – Eating a healthy diet and exercising during pregnancy isn't just good for the developing baby. A new analysis of 36 studies including a total of more than 12,500 women suggests these behaviors can also lower a mom-to-be's chances of having a Cesarean-section delivery or developing diabetes while pregnant. Overall, healthy habits reduced the risk of needing a C-section by about 10 percent, said study author Shakila Thangaratinam. She's a professor of maternal and perinatal health at Queen Mary University of London. A healthy lifestyle also reduced a woman's risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy – known as gestational diabetes – by 24 percent, the findings showed. Not surprisingly, healthy habits also trimmed the possibility of excess weight gain during pregnancy. "Based on all the evidence to date, what we found was a healthy diet and moderate ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Emergency Contraception, Postcoital Contraception, Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Induction, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Pain, Cervical Ripening, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Apnea of Prematurity, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Does Stress Intensify Harms Done By Chemical Exposure in Pregnancy?

Posted 12 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 12, 2017 – More evidence of stress's harmful effects comes from a pregnancy study. California researchers found that stress increases the risk that exposure to toxic chemicals in pregnancy will lead to a low birth weight baby. "It appears that stress may amplify the health effects of toxic chemical exposure, which means that for some people, toxic chemicals become more toxic," said senior author Tracey Woodruff, a professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at the University of California, San Francisco. Woodruff and colleagues at UC Berkeley reviewed 17 human and 22 animal studies that investigated the links between chemicals, stress and fetal development. The review found that several toxic chemicals commonly found in the environment had a much greater impact on pregnant women if they had high levels of stress. The researchers measured stress by ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Delivery, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

No Sign That Antidepressants in Pregnancy Harm Kids' Brains: Study

Posted 12 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 12, 2017 – For women battling depression, the decision over whether or not to continue their antidepressant during a pregnancy can be a difficult one. Now, reassuring news: A new study finds little risk of intellectual disability in children whose mothers take these pills while pregnant. The data "provides more information for clinicians to evaluate the risks in pregnant women taking antidepressants," said study co-author Abraham Reichenberg. He is a professor of psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. The new findings "should be factored into other considerations, such as the increased risk for the mother if [she is] not medicated, the drug's side effects, and other medical conditions," Reichenberg explained in a hospital news release. One specialist in the developing brain stressed that going without a needed antidepressant during ... Read more

Related support groups: Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Effexor, Prozac, Celexa, Citalopram, Paxil, Sertraline, Pristiq, Amitriptyline, Venlafaxine, Effexor XR, Fluoxetine, Mirtazapine, Escitalopram, Remeron, Savella, Nortriptyline, Elavil

Do Moms Who Smoke in Pregnancy Raise Their Odds for a Troubled Teen?

Posted 11 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 11, 2017 – Expectant mothers have been warned for years to avoid cigarettes. Now researchers report another reason to follow that advice: Teens and young adults whose mothers smoked during pregnancy may be more likely to break the law and be antisocial. The study included thousands of people in New England who were followed from birth into their 30s. The research wasn't designed to prove cause-and-effect. However, kids of women who smoked an extra pack of cigarettes a day had a 30 percent increased risk of three or more symptoms of conduct disorder as a teen, and a more than threefold increased risk of three or more symptoms of antisocial personality disorder as a young adult, the investigators found. These children also had a more than double increased risk of having a record of non-violent offenses as a teen and of committing a violent offense as a young adult, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Wellbutrin, Bupropion, Smoking, Chantix, Wellbutrin XL, Smoking Cessation, Wellbutrin SR, Nicotine, Zyban, Delivery, Champix, Nicorette, Nicoderm CQ, Nicotrol Inhaler, Premature Labor, Commit, Budeprion, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Aplenzin, Varenicline

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