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Labor Pain News

Are Catholic Women Less Likely to Breast-Feed?

Posted 1 day 22 hours ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 5, 2016 – Could religion play a role in breast-feeding practices? Women in Western nations with a strong Protestant heritage are more likely to breast-feed. However, the reverse seems to be true for those in nations with a strong Catholic heritage, new research suggests. "Our results suggest that women living in a country or region where Catholicism has historically dominated are less likely to initiate breast-feeding," according to the researchers. The study was led by Dr. Jonathan Bernard of Inserm, the national health research institute in France. "Breast-feeding promotion policies should be adapted to better fit populations' cultural and religious norms," Bernard and his colleagues added. The study doesn't prove that religion directly affects breast-feeding rates, however. It only suggests that they may be linked. The World Health Organization advises mothers to solely ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

C-Sections May Be Causing Evolutionary Changes

Posted 2 days 2 hours ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 5, 2016 – Why is it so difficult and painful for human females to give birth? Researchers have developed a new theory: Evolution favored small female pelvises and large newborns for good reasons. And, the researchers said, the rise of cesarean sections – the surgical delivery of a baby – in recent decades may be contributing to an even bigger gap between the size of newborns and their mothers' pelvises. In fact, the researchers estimate that the regular use of C-sections has led to a 10 to 20 percent increase in the gap between female pelvis width and babies' size. "Evolution is happening even in our modern society," said study lead author Philipp Mitteroecker, an assistant professor with the Department of Theoretical Biology at the University of Vienna, Austria. But, the human female pelvis has remained small, despite evolution, the researchers said. "The dimensions of ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Diagnosis and Investigation, Labor Pain, Cervical Ripening, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Do Women Who Have Kids Later Live Longer?

Posted 18 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 – In what's believed to be the first study of its kind, research suggests that women who give birth for the first time at age 25 or older are more likely to live to 90. The researchers also found that women who survived to 90 were more likely to be college graduates, married and have a higher income. "Our study results don't suggest women should delay childbearing, because it's not clearly known why the results suggest [the link to] longevity," said study author Aladdin Shadyab. He's a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. "Also, a likely explanation is that women who have a child at an older age are usually of higher social and economic status," Shadyab added. "We know from [prior] research that these people are also likely to live longer." While the average American woman giving birth for the first time today is ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Could C-Section Birth Raise Child's Risk of Obesity?

Posted 14 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Nov. 13, 2016 – Babies delivered via C-section might be at increased risk for childhood obesity, researchers contend. Compared to vaginally delivered children, cesarean-delivered children seem to have a 40 percent greater risk of becoming overweight or obese by the time they turn 7, the study found. The risk was even stronger in children born by C-section to overweight and obese mothers, ranging from 70 to 80 percent, said lead researcher Noel Mueller, an assistant professor of epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. "We also found that the protective association conferred by vaginal delivery was as strong, if not stronger, among mothers that were overweight or obese, suggesting that vaginal delivery among overweight or obese mothers may help to mitigate the intergenerational transmission of obesity," Mueller said. Babies pick up beneficial ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

New Moms Get No Iron Boost From Eating Placenta: Study

Posted 12 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 – Tens of thousands of new mothers eat their placenta, hoping to prevent or reverse iron deficiency after they give birth, a practice called placentophagy. But a new study says placenta may not provide as much iron as placentophagy advocates suggest. Eating human placenta in capsule form "neither significantly improves, nor impairs, postpartum maternal iron status for women consuming the recommended daily allowance of dietary iron during pregnancy/lactation," compared to a dummy pill, the study's authors concluded. The placenta, or afterbirth, connects the mother to her fetus in the womb. It supplies oxygen and nutrients to the fetus and hormones to the mother. Nearly all mammals eat it after giving birth, and advocates say human mothers who do so will have more energy, a better mood and a faster recovery after giving birth. Led by former University of Nevada, Las ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Premature Calcium Deposits May Trigger Premature Births: Study

Posted 9 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 9, 2016 – A new potential risk factor for premature birth has been identified. Ten percent of infants are born prematurely (before 37 weeks of pregnancy), and many suffer long-term health problems. Knowing why preterm births occur might help prevent them, researchers said. A team at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, found that calcium deposits in the membrane surrounding the fetus can form early and may cause a mother's water to break too soon. The deposits, early markers of bone, make the membrane less elastic. The same kind of deposits have also been implicated in kidney stones and hardening of the arteries. But the new study did not prove that these early calcium deposits cause premature birth. "We do see calcium deposits in full term births as well, which is probably part of the normal breakdown of the membranes at the appropriate time," study senior ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Calcium Oxalate Calculi with Hyperuricosuria

Health Tip: Safer Sleep for Baby

Posted 8 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Exactly what do worried parents need to do to keep baby safer while the infant is asleep? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends: Always put baby to sleep on the back, until baby turns a year old. If baby rolls over, you don't need to keep flipping the infant back. Just keep the crib clear of any objects, including pillows, bumper pads, toys and blankets. If baby falls asleep in a swing, or car seat, transfer baby to the crib as soon as possible. Make sure baby's crib mattress is firm. Don't let baby sleep in your bed. But for at least the first six months, put baby's crib in your bedroom. Never let baby sleep on a couch or chair. If you swaddle baby, make sure it's not too tight. Stop swaddling when baby tries to roll over. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Be Alert for PTSD After Pregnancy Loss

Posted 2 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 2, 2016 – Post-traumatic stress disorder can develop in women after pregnancy loss, a new British study finds. Women who suffer a miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy should be routinely screened for PTSD and receive mental health support, the researchers said. "We were surprised at the high number of women who experienced symptoms of PTSD after early pregnancy loss," said study lead author Jessica Farren, of the department of surgery and cancer at Imperial College London. "At the moment, there is no routine follow-up appointment for women who have suffered a miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy," Farren said. "We have checks in place for [postpartum] depression, but we don't have anything in place for the trauma and depression following pregnancy loss," she said in a college news release. PTSD causes people to relive frightening or distressing events through nightmares, ... Read more

Related support groups: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Delivery, Premature Labor, Postpartum Bleeding, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Less Labor Pain, Lower Postpartum Depression Risk?

Posted 26 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 – Women who obtain good pain relief during labor may have to worry less about postpartum depression later, new research suggests. "Reducing pain during labor is associated with a reduced risk for postpartum depression," said study leader Dr. Grace Lim, director of obstetric anesthesiology at Magee-Women's Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Postpartum depression is a common condition, affecting one in eight women after having a baby. They may experience crying, feelings of anger, and anxiety about not being a good mother, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. So how might pain relief during labor affect a woman's mental health weeks later? First, Lim said, it's important to stress that the new study only found a link between pain relief in labor and less postpartum depression. It didn't prove a cause-and-effect ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Induction, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Birthing Pool Not the Place to Deliver, New Guidelines Say

Posted 25 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 – While a birthing pool during the early stages of labor may offer some advantages, women should not deliver their baby in the water, new guidelines advise. Birthing pools can be found in hospitals, birthing centers or at home. A woman in labor lies in a tub of warm water to help ease delivery. "Immersion in water during the first stage of labor may offer some benefits: It may shorten labor and is associated with a decreased use of epidurals [injecting anesthesia into the spine]," said Dr. Joseph Wax. He chaired the committee that developed the recommendations for the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). "However, it is important to differentiate between laboring in water and delivering in water," Wax said in an ACOG news release. "There is no evidence to support delivering a baby in water has benefits to the baby." In fact, according to ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Postpartum Bleeding, Labor Pain, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

'Laughing Gas' May Not Ease Pain During Childbirth: Study

Posted 24 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 – Most women who choose so-called laughing gas to control pain while giving birth eventually ask for an epidural anyway, a new study finds. Laughing gas (nitrous oxide) is an inhaled anesthetic commonly used to manage labor pain in a number of countries. The gas reduces anxiety and makes patients less aware of pain, researchers said. "Nitrous oxide is gaining interest among expectant mothers as an option to manage labor pain and is becoming more widely available in the United States," said lead investigator Dr. Caitlin Sutton, an obstetric anesthesiology fellow at Stanford University School of Medicine in Palo Alto, Calif. "However, we found that for the majority of patients, nitrous oxide does not prevent them from requesting an epidural. While nitrous oxide may be somewhat helpful, epidural anesthesia remains the most effective method for managing labor pain," ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Nitrous Oxide, Labor Pain, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Having Baby Too Soon After Weight-Loss Surgery May Raise Risks

Posted 19 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 – Infants born to mothers who've had weight-loss surgery have a higher risk for complications, and the risks are greatest for those born within two years of the surgery, a new study finds. "A recently postoperative mother with underlying nutritional, metabolic, and physiological changes is at an elevated risk for perinatal complications," concluded a team led by Dr. Brodie Parent, of the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle. One obstetrician who reviewed the findings said the issue is arising more frequently as bariatric (weight-loss) surgeries surge in popularity. "I have been acutely aware of the recent increase in patients who have had bariatric procedures," said Dr. Brian McKennna, who directs gynecology at Northwell Health's Southside Hospital in Bay Shore, N.Y. "Many of these patients have had serious nutritional deficits even before their ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Delivery, Gastric Bypass Surgery, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Expecting Twins or Triplets? What You Should Know Before They Arrive

Posted 18 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 – The number of U.S. couples expecting twins or even triplets is on the rise, and these parents will have their hands full. Fortunately, there are many ways to prepare ahead of time, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Keep in mind that "multiples" are often born early and tend to be smaller than the average newborn. The AAP says parents may need to visit with their pediatrician more often than usual and reach out for help with feeding concerns or strategies. Two or three newborns also use double or triple the number of diapers. But having multiples also means fitting more safety seats into the car, more clothing, more food and possibly even a larger home, the academy pointed out in a news release. Multiples may share everything, but they are individuals and should be raised as such, the AAP advises. Identical twins, in particular, may seem like ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Delivering Twins at 37 Weeks May Help Prevent Stillbirths

Posted 7 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7, 2016 – A woman carrying twins should deliver her babies at 37 weeks to reduce the risk of stillbirth and newborn death, new research says. A normal pregnancy usually lasts 40 weeks. The risk of stillbirth (when a fetus dies in the womb) is higher in twin pregnancies, and it's common for doctors to deliver twins early in an attempt to prevent stillbirth. But the best time for such deliveries has been unclear, the study authors said. To find an answer, the international team of researchers reviewed 32 studies that were conducted over the past 10 years and included more than 35,000 twin pregnancies. The researchers compared the risk of stillbirth to the risk of newborn death. Newborn death was defined as death up to 28 days after delivery. The risk of stillbirth starts increasing if a twin pregnancy goes too long. But, the risk of newborn death goes down as the length ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Induction, Premature Labor, Labor Pain, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

3 Steps to Lower a Woman's Risk of Premature Birth

Posted 31 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 30, 2016 – Up to one-quarter of preterm births might be prevented if women paid attention to three risk factors that are under their control, new research suggests. Those factors include spacing pregnancies well, beginning at a healthy weight and gaining the recommended amount during the pregnancy, the researchers found. "These are all risk factors for a really serious health outcome – preterm birth," said study co-author Dr. Emily DeFranco. She is a researcher at the Center for Prevention of Preterm Birth at Cincinnati Children's Hospital. Babies born before 37 weeks' gestation are considered preterm. Being born early puts babies at risk for breathing, heart, gastrointestinal and developmental problems, among other issues. In the United States, the overall rate of preterm birth is 11.4 percent – more than twice as high as that in several other developed countries, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Delivery, Labor Pain, Apnea of Prematurity, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

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