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Related terms: Total Knee Replacement, Knee Replacement

High-Mileage Runners Expend Less Energy

Posted 27 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 27, 2017 – The bodies of runners who put in a lot of mileage appear to be more efficient at running compared to those who run less, a new study finds. Jasper Verheul and colleagues at Liverpool John Moores University in the United Kingdom compared two groups of runners. One group ran more than 27 miles a week, the other group ran fewer than nine miles a week. The researchers examined the activity of muscle groups in the thigh and the motion of knee joints with a variety of tools as the participants ran at different speeds. "Given the importance of the knee joint in running, it was hoped that by examining knee joint stiffness and muscle activation levels across a range of running speeds, the adaptations of neuromuscular factors due to running training could be closely explored for the first time," the researchers wrote. When their feet landed on the ground, the knees of the ... Read more

Related support groups: Knee Joint Replacement, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Prevention of Fractures

Joints That Make Those Popping or Cracking Sounds

Posted 27 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 27, 2017 – If you've ever heard a loud pop as you bent down to pick something up, you'll be relieved to know that it's normal for your joints to make popping and cracking noises. These sounds can be caused by a number of things, including when soft tissues – such as tendons and ligaments – rub or snap over other tissues and bones, explained Dr. Aman Dhawan. He is an orthopedic sports medicine specialist at Penn State Health's Milton Hershey Medical Center. "Our joints are mobile, so there are a lot of things that slide over or run past each other. When they move, there is the potential for anatomy to intersect," he said in a Penn State news release. The sounds can also be caused by pockets of nitrogen gas within the fluid that helps lubricate joints and provides nutrition to cartilage, Dhawan added. According to Dr. Robert Gallo, another orthopedic sports medicine ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Muscle Pain, Knee Joint Replacement, Temporomandibular Joint Disorder, Nocturnal Leg Cramps

Work Disability Benefits? Depends on the Doc

Posted 26 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2017 – Medical professionals give widely varying opinions about whether claimants for work disability benefits should get those benefits, researchers report. After a disabling illness or injury, many workers seek benefits to replace their lost wages. Insurers provide benefits for employees who are evaluated and deemed eligible. Medical professionals are hired by insurers to evaluate these employees, but there have been concerns about the quality of these evaluations, the researchers explained. The research team, led by Dr. Regina Kunz from the University of Basel in Switzerland, analyzed 23 studies conducted between 1992 and 2016 in 12 countries in North America, Europe, Australia, the Middle East and Asia. In 63 percent of the studies, there was only low to moderate agreement in medical experts' opinions about disability benefits claimants' ability to work. Higher ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Myocardial Infarction, Prevention of Falls

Joints Achy? Don't Blame Mother Nature

Posted 10 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 – You might want to think twice the next time you're ready to blame the weather for your aches and pains, researchers say. Some people swear that changes in humidity, temperature, air pressure and the like trigger back pain and arthritis. But a team at the George Institute for Global Health in Newtown, Australia said it found no evidence to support that theory. "The belief that pain and inclement weather are linked dates back to Roman times. But our research suggests this belief may be based on the fact that people recall events that confirm their pre-existing views," said Chris Maher, director of the institute's musculoskeletal division. The study included nearly 1,350 Australians with either lower back pain or osteoarthritis of the knee. The study participants' pain flare-ups were compared with weather data. There was no association between back pain/knee ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Back Pain, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Osteoarthritis, Muscle Pain, Sciatica, Neck Pain, Knee Joint Replacement, Scoliosis, Frozen Shoulder

Is Running Bad Or Good for Your Knees?

Posted 5 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 5, 2017 – Everybody believes running can leave you sore and swollen, right? Well, a new study suggests running might actually reduce inflammation in joints. "It flies in the face of intuition," said study co-author Matt Seeley, an associate professor of exercise sciences at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. "This idea that long-distance running is bad for your knees might be a myth." Seeley and his colleagues reached their surprising conclusion after analyzing the knee joint fluid of several healthy men and women between the ages of 18 and 35. The researchers looked for signs of inflammation in chemical markers before and after a 30-minute run and found little difference. "What we now know is that for young, healthy individuals, exercise creates an anti-inflammatory environment that may be beneficial in terms of long-term joint health," lead author Robert Hyldahl ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoarthritis, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Knee Cartilage Product Approved to Repair Defects

Posted 14 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14, 2016 – Maci (autologous cultured chondrocytes) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to repair defective cartilage of the knee. The treatment, derived from healthy cartilage from the patient's own knee, uses tissue engineering to grow cells that replace the damaged cartilage, the agency said in a news release. Cartilage defects commonly stem from an injury, knee strain, overuse, muscle weakness or general wear-and-tear, the FDA said. The new process uses the patient's own (autologous) cells, which are placed on a collagen membrane scaffolding that is surgically implanted over the area where damaged cartilage was removed. The membrane is designed to be absorbed by the body over time. The surgeon installing the implants should be trained in the Maci product. Multiple implants can be used if there is more than one defect, the FDA said. Maci's ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Health Tip: Beginning Yoga

Posted 24 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If you have arthritis and want to start practicing yoga, you'll need to make sure that your routine is safe and effective. The Harvard Medical School recommends: Avoiding vigorous types of yoga that could injure your joints. Move slowly and easily. Opting for forms of yoga such as Vinyasa or flow, which are less stressful on the joints. Talking to your instructor before your class about your condition and any precautions you should take. Practicing yoga in the afternoon or evening instead of the morning, when your joints may be stiffer. Talking to your doctor about adjusting your yoga movements during flares to accommodate painful joints. Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Back Pain, Knee Joint Replacement

Cartilage From Nose Used to Repair Damaged Knees

Posted 21 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 – Using cells from the cartilage in patients' noses, Swiss doctors have successfully made patches to treat 10 adults whose knee cartilage was damaged by injury. Two years after the transplants, most of the patients grew new cartilage in their knees and reported improvements in pain, knee function and quality of life. "We have developed a new, promising approach to the treatment of articular cartilage injuries," said lead researcher Ivan Martin, a professor of tissue engineering at the University of Basel. The articular cartilage is the tissue that covers and protects the ends of the knee bones, and injuries to it can lead to degenerative joint conditions like osteoarthritis. Although the results of this preliminary trial are encouraging, more research is needed before this technique could become widely available, Martin stressed. "Before this can be offered to ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Diagnosis and Investigation

Number of Americans With Severe Joint Pain Keeps Rising

Posted 6 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 – Severe joint pain plagues an increasing number of aging, often arthritic Americans, a new report finds. In 2002, about 10.5 million people in the United States said they battled severe joint pain, but by 2014 that number had jumped to 14.6 million, said researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC team defined "severe" joint pain as discomfort measuring 7 or more on a 1-to-10 score on a questionnaire, with 1 being no pain and 10 being "pain and aching as bad as it can be." The problem may only get worse, the researchers said, since much of this joint pain is linked to arthritis. One in every four people with arthritis in the new study rated his or her pain as "severe," and arthritis cases among Americans are expected to rise. In the United States, "arthritis affected an estimated 52.5 million [22.7 percent] adults in 2010-2012 ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Back Pain, Knee Joint Replacement, Joint Infection

Encouraging Surgical ICU Patients to Get Moving Pays Off

Posted 2 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 30, 2016 – Getting out of bed and moving around as soon as possible benefits surgical intensive care unit patients, a new study shows. Among 200 surgical ICU patients in the United States, Germany and Austria, those encouraged to move around sooner than usual were discharged from the ICU and the hospital earlier than others, researchers found. "We have become much more successful in making sure patients hospitalized after serious injury or major surgery survive their stays in surgical ICUs," said study leader Dr. Matthias Eikermann, of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. "But many patients who spend a long time in the ICU develop muscle weakness that can lead to prolonged rehabilitation requirements, with some being unable to walk or take care of themselves up to a year after hospital discharge," he said in a hospital news release. Setting daily goals for each ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis

Nanoparticles Ease Aching Joints in Mice

Posted 27 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 – New research in mice suggests that tiny nanoparticles might one day be a better way to deliver medicine to inflamed joints in humans. The therapy may reduce the risk of osteoarthritis in people who have suffered joint injuries, the study authors said. About 12 percent of osteoarthritis cases stem from previous joint injuries. The experimental treatment may also benefit people who already have osteoarthritis, according to the study team from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. While nonprescription painkillers – such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) – help reduce the pain of joint injuries, they don't stop cartilage destruction caused by inflammation. "I see a lot of patients with osteoarthritis, and there's really no treatment," study senior author Dr. Christine Pham, an associate professor of medicine, said in a ... Read more

Related support groups: Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Osteoarthritis, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Acetaminophen, Advil, Excedrin, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Motrin, Knee Joint Replacement, Endocet, Darvocet-N 100, Acetaminophen/Hydrocodone, Tylenol PM, Tylenol with Codeine, Percocet 10/325

Health Tip: Exercise a Painful Knee

Posted 20 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

-- The thought of exercising an aching knee may sound painful, but gentle stretches can really help ease symptoms. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons explains how: By strengthening surrounding muscles. This means better shock absorption, less pain and less risk of future injury. By loosening tight muscles, which are more prone to injury By enhancing flexibility in the knee, making the joint and surrounding muscles less sore. Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Knee Joint Replacement

Knee Surgery Rarer, but Problems More Likely, for Minority Patients

Posted 18 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 18, 2016 – Minority patients in the United States are less likely to get knee replacement surgery, but more likely to have complications when they do, a new study finds. Knee replacement can be used to treat patients who have severe pain, stiffness and reduced knee function, often due to arthritis or injury. More than 600,000 knee replacements are done in the United States each year. "Even after adjusting for certain patient demographics, socioeconomic status, and health care system characteristics, significant racial disparities in [total knee replacement] utilization and outcomes exist," corresponding study author Yan Ma said. Ma is an associate professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Ma and his colleagues analyzed federal data on more than 547,000 total knee ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Will 'Unloading' Shoes Help Your Arthritic Knees?

Posted 12 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 12, 2016 – For reducing pain from arthritic knees, "unloading" shoes don't offer a leg up over conventional walking shoes, new research indicates. With their modified midsoles, unloading shoes aim to reduce the force (or "load") placed on an affected knee joint, according to their manufacturer. But after focusing on one brand – the "Gel Melbourne OA" shoe by Asics – the Australian researchers concluded the special shoes were no better for knee arthritis than standard lace-up footwear. "With its specific design features, [the unloading shoe] does significantly reduce the forces acting across the inner compartment of the knee joint," said study lead author Rana Hinman. But its users didn't report greater pain relief than those wearing new regular walking shoes, said Hinman, an associate professor of physiotherapy at the University of Melbourne. Among study participants, ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoarthritis, Knee Joint Replacement, Foot Care

Common Surgeries Raise Risk for Opioid Dependence: Study

Posted 12 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 11, 2016 – After knee surgery and other common operations, patients have an elevated risk of growing dependent on opioid painkillers, a new study finds. These prescription painkillers include hydrocodone (Vycodin, Lortab), oxycodone (OxyContin) and fentanyl, the narcotic implicated in the April 21 death of rock legend Prince. "For a lot of surgeries there is a higher chance of getting hooked on painkillers," said study author Dr. Eric Sun, an instructor at Stanford University School of Medicine, in Palo Alto, Calif. But Sun cautioned that the finding isn't a reason to avoid surgery. "The message isn't that you shouldn't have surgery," said Sun. "Rather, there are things that anesthesiologists can do to reduce the risk by finding other ways of controlling the pain and using replacements for opioids when possible." For the study, the researchers examined medical claims of ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Surgery, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Opana ER, Roxicodone

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