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Related terms: Total Knee Replacement, Knee Replacement

Health Tip: Beginning Yoga

Posted 4 days ago by

-- If you have arthritis and want to start practicing yoga, you'll need to make sure that your routine is safe and effective. The Harvard Medical School recommends: Avoiding vigorous types of yoga that could injure your joints. Move slowly and easily. Opting for forms of yoga such as Vinyasa or flow, which are less stressful on the joints. Talking to your instructor before your class about your condition and any precautions you should take. Practicing yoga in the afternoon or evening instead of the morning, when your joints may be stiffer. Talking to your doctor about adjusting your yoga movements during flares to accommodate painful joints. Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Back Pain, Knee Joint Replacement

Cartilage From Nose Used to Repair Damaged Knees

Posted 7 days ago by

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 – Using cells from the cartilage in patients' noses, Swiss doctors have successfully made patches to treat 10 adults whose knee cartilage was damaged by injury. Two years after the transplants, most of the patients grew new cartilage in their knees and reported improvements in pain, knee function and quality of life. "We have developed a new, promising approach to the treatment of articular cartilage injuries," said lead researcher Ivan Martin, a professor of tissue engineering at the University of Basel. The articular cartilage is the tissue that covers and protects the ends of the knee bones, and injuries to it can lead to degenerative joint conditions like osteoarthritis. Although the results of this preliminary trial are encouraging, more research is needed before this technique could become widely available, Martin stressed. "Before this can be offered to ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Diagnosis and Investigation

Number of Americans With Severe Joint Pain Keeps Rising

Posted 6 Oct 2016 by

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 – Severe joint pain plagues an increasing number of aging, often arthritic Americans, a new report finds. In 2002, about 10.5 million people in the United States said they battled severe joint pain, but by 2014 that number had jumped to 14.6 million, said researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC team defined "severe" joint pain as discomfort measuring 7 or more on a 1-to-10 score on a questionnaire, with 1 being no pain and 10 being "pain and aching as bad as it can be." The problem may only get worse, the researchers said, since much of this joint pain is linked to arthritis. One in every four people with arthritis in the new study rated his or her pain as "severe," and arthritis cases among Americans are expected to rise. In the United States, "arthritis affected an estimated 52.5 million [22.7 percent] adults in 2010-2012 ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Back Pain, Knee Joint Replacement, Joint Infection

Encouraging Surgical ICU Patients to Get Moving Pays Off

Posted 2 Oct 2016 by

FRIDAY, Sept. 30, 2016 – Getting out of bed and moving around as soon as possible benefits surgical intensive care unit patients, a new study shows. Among 200 surgical ICU patients in the United States, Germany and Austria, those encouraged to move around sooner than usual were discharged from the ICU and the hospital earlier than others, researchers found. "We have become much more successful in making sure patients hospitalized after serious injury or major surgery survive their stays in surgical ICUs," said study leader Dr. Matthias Eikermann, of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. "But many patients who spend a long time in the ICU develop muscle weakness that can lead to prolonged rehabilitation requirements, with some being unable to walk or take care of themselves up to a year after hospital discharge," he said in a hospital news release. Setting daily goals for each ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis

Nanoparticles Ease Aching Joints in Mice

Posted 27 Sep 2016 by

TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 – New research in mice suggests that tiny nanoparticles might one day be a better way to deliver medicine to inflamed joints in humans. The therapy may reduce the risk of osteoarthritis in people who have suffered joint injuries, the study authors said. About 12 percent of osteoarthritis cases stem from previous joint injuries. The experimental treatment may also benefit people who already have osteoarthritis, according to the study team from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. While nonprescription painkillers – such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) – help reduce the pain of joint injuries, they don't stop cartilage destruction caused by inflammation. "I see a lot of patients with osteoarthritis, and there's really no treatment," study senior author Dr. Christine Pham, an associate professor of medicine, said in a ... Read more

Related support groups: Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Osteoarthritis, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Acetaminophen, Advil, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Motrin, Knee Joint Replacement, Excedrin, Endocet, Darvocet-N 100, Tylenol PM, Acetaminophen/Hydrocodone, Tylenol with Codeine, Percocet 10/325

Health Tip: Exercise a Painful Knee

Posted 20 Sep 2016 by

-- The thought of exercising an aching knee may sound painful, but gentle stretches can really help ease symptoms. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons explains how: By strengthening surrounding muscles. This means better shock absorption, less pain and less risk of future injury. By loosening tight muscles, which are more prone to injury By enhancing flexibility in the knee, making the joint and surrounding muscles less sore. Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Knee Joint Replacement

Knee Surgery Rarer, but Problems More Likely, for Minority Patients

Posted 18 Aug 2016 by

THURSDAY, Aug. 18, 2016 – Minority patients in the United States are less likely to get knee replacement surgery, but more likely to have complications when they do, a new study finds. Knee replacement can be used to treat patients who have severe pain, stiffness and reduced knee function, often due to arthritis or injury. More than 600,000 knee replacements are done in the United States each year. "Even after adjusting for certain patient demographics, socioeconomic status, and health care system characteristics, significant racial disparities in [total knee replacement] utilization and outcomes exist," corresponding study author Yan Ma said. Ma is an associate professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Ma and his colleagues analyzed federal data on more than 547,000 total knee ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery

Will 'Unloading' Shoes Help Your Arthritic Knees?

Posted 12 Aug 2016 by

FRIDAY, Aug. 12, 2016 – For reducing pain from arthritic knees, "unloading" shoes don't offer a leg up over conventional walking shoes, new research indicates. With their modified midsoles, unloading shoes aim to reduce the force (or "load") placed on an affected knee joint, according to their manufacturer. But after focusing on one brand – the "Gel Melbourne OA" shoe by Asics – the Australian researchers concluded the special shoes were no better for knee arthritis than standard lace-up footwear. "With its specific design features, [the unloading shoe] does significantly reduce the forces acting across the inner compartment of the knee joint," said study lead author Rana Hinman. But its users didn't report greater pain relief than those wearing new regular walking shoes, said Hinman, an associate professor of physiotherapy at the University of Melbourne. Among study participants, ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoarthritis, Knee Joint Replacement, Foot Care

Common Surgeries Raise Risk for Opioid Dependence: Study

Posted 12 Jul 2016 by

MONDAY, July 11, 2016 – After knee surgery and other common operations, patients have an elevated risk of growing dependent on opioid painkillers, a new study finds. These prescription painkillers include hydrocodone (Vycodin, Lortab), oxycodone (OxyContin) and fentanyl, the narcotic implicated in the April 21 death of rock legend Prince. "For a lot of surgeries there is a higher chance of getting hooked on painkillers," said study author Dr. Eric Sun, an instructor at Stanford University School of Medicine, in Palo Alto, Calif. But Sun cautioned that the finding isn't a reason to avoid surgery. "The message isn't that you shouldn't have surgery," said Sun. "Rather, there are things that anesthesiologists can do to reduce the risk by finding other ways of controlling the pain and using replacements for opioids when possible." For the study, the researchers examined medical claims of ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Surgery, Methadone, Hydrocodone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Opana ER, Roxicodone

Repaired ACL More Likely to Tear Again in Young Women

Posted 9 Jul 2016 by

THURSDAY, July 7, 2016 – Female athletes younger than 25 have the highest risk for a repeat tear of the knee's anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) after surgery to repair it, a new study says. The study included just over 500 male and female athletes who underwent ACL reconstruction with a hamstring graft and were followed for two years. Their average age was 27. They were allowed to return to sports six to 12 months after surgery if they were pain-free, had equal quadriceps/hamstring strength, and had finished a rehabilitation program. "Our research noted that female patients under the age of 25 with a [smaller] graft size of less than 8 millimeters have an increased chance of re-tearing their ACL following reconstruction," study lead author Dr. Duong Nguyen said in an American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine news release. He is an orthopedic surgeon and adjunct clinical professor ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis

Health Tip: Coping With Knee Arthritis

Posted 6 Jul 2016 by

-- Knee arthritis can make it difficult to exercise, or even perform day-to-day activities. But there are ways to treat symptoms without surgery. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons advises: Ease strain on your knees, such as by avoiding stairs, opting for low-impact exercise and losing weight. Practice physical therapy to promote strength, flexibility and function in your knee. Consider cushioned shoes, a knee brace or bandage, or a cane. Use heat or cold therapy to help ease pain and stiffness. Talk to your doctor about using medication and alternative therapies. Read more

Related support groups: Osteoarthritis, Knee Joint Replacement

Health Tip: Exercising After Joint Replacement

Posted 28 Jun 2016 by

-- Having joint replacement surgery doesn't mean exercise is out of the picture. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons offers these guidelines: Your doctor may have restrictions on your exercise regimen, so always consult your doctor before you exercise after surgery. Until your doctor says it's OK, don't jog, ski, run or do other exercises that put the replaced joint under stress. Opt for less-stressful exercises such as swimming, doubles tennis, golf and biking. Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement

New Treatment Shows Promise for Crippling Knee Arthritis

Posted 24 Jun 2016 by

FRIDAY, June 24, 2016 – For those who suffer debilitating arthritis in their knees, researchers report in a small study that just one injection of stem cells can reduce pain and inflammation. The idea is experimental: Extract stem cells from a patient's own body fat – cells known for their ability to differentiate and perform any number of regenerative functions – and inject them directly into the damaged knee joint. "While the goal of this small study was to evaluate the safety of using a patient's own stem cells to treat osteoarthritis of the knee, it also showed that one group of patients experienced improvements in pain and function," noted Dr. Anthony Atala, director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, in Winston-Salem, N.C. He was not involved in the study. "In fact, most of the patients who had previously scheduled total knee replacement surgery decided to ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoarthritis, Knee Joint Replacement, Diagnosis and Investigation

Refugees Aren't Getting Needed Surgeries

Posted 3 Jun 2016 by

THURSDAY, June 2, 2016 – Millions of refugees aren't getting the surgery they need, researchers report. "When planning to take care of refugees, much thought is put into how to house and feed and clothe people who are far from home for circumstances often beyond their control. But surgery is a basic need and nobody talks about this," said Dr. Adam Kushner, leader of a new study conducted at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. An analysis of data from the United Nations and other sources estimates that the roughly 60 million refugees worldwide may need at least 2.8 million surgeries a year. But their circumstances make it difficult to receive that type of medical care, the researchers added. The types of surgeries required range from broken bones and hernia repair to cesarean sections, cleft lips, gallbladder removal and burn care, the study found. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Hiatal Hernia, Inguinal Hernia, Surgical Prophylaxis, Cesarean Section, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Knee Replacement Patients May Be Able to Hit the Shower Sooner

Posted 27 May 2016 by

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 – Knee surgery patients are usually instructed to wait two weeks after surgery to take a shower to reduce the risk of infection. But a small new study suggests this may not be necessary. Researchers found no differences in bacterial swabs from those who waited two weeks to shower compared with those allowed to shower after about two days. That's no doubt welcome news to the many patients who've struggled to find a way to bathe without getting their incision wet. The study, led by Dr. Harold Rees, an orthopaedic surgeon at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Ill., followed 32 patients. Half were randomly assigned to shower after two weeks. The other half could shower as soon as their surgical dressing was removed – typically two days after surgery. None of the patients developed a post-operative infection, the study found. And, unsurprisingly, patients ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Knee Replacement Surgery

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