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Knee Joint Replacement News

Related terms: Total Knee Replacement, Knee Replacement

Common Surgeries Raise Risk for Opioid Dependence: Study

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 11, 2016 – After knee surgery and other common operations, patients have an elevated risk of growing dependent on opioid painkillers, a new study finds. These prescription painkillers include hydrocodone (Vycodin, Lortab), oxycodone (OxyContin) and fentanyl, the narcotic implicated in the April 21 death of rock legend Prince. "For a lot of surgeries there is a higher chance of getting hooked on painkillers," said study author Dr. Eric Sun, an instructor at Stanford University School of Medicine, in Palo Alto, Calif. But Sun cautioned that the finding isn't a reason to avoid surgery. "The message isn't that you shouldn't have surgery," said Sun. "Rather, there are things that anesthesiologists can do to reduce the risk by finding other ways of controlling the pain and using replacements for opioids when possible." For the study, the researchers examined medical claims of ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Surgery, Methadone, Hydrocodone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid, Opana ER, Roxicodone

Repaired ACL More Likely to Tear Again in Young Women

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 7, 2016 – Female athletes younger than 25 have the highest risk for a repeat tear of the knee's anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) after surgery to repair it, a new study says. The study included just over 500 male and female athletes who underwent ACL reconstruction with a hamstring graft and were followed for two years. Their average age was 27. They were allowed to return to sports six to 12 months after surgery if they were pain-free, had equal quadriceps/hamstring strength, and had finished a rehabilitation program. "Our research noted that female patients under the age of 25 with a [smaller] graft size of less than 8 millimeters have an increased chance of re-tearing their ACL following reconstruction," study lead author Dr. Duong Nguyen said in an American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine news release. He is an orthopedic surgeon and adjunct clinical professor ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Surgical Prophylaxis

Health Tip: Coping With Knee Arthritis

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Knee arthritis can make it difficult to exercise, or even perform day-to-day activities. But there are ways to treat symptoms without surgery. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons advises: Ease strain on your knees, such as by avoiding stairs, opting for low-impact exercise and losing weight. Practice physical therapy to promote strength, flexibility and function in your knee. Consider cushioned shoes, a knee brace or bandage, or a cane. Use heat or cold therapy to help ease pain and stiffness. Talk to your doctor about using medication and alternative therapies. Read more

Related support groups: Osteoarthritis, Knee Joint Replacement

Health Tip: Exercising After Joint Replacement

Posted 28 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Having joint replacement surgery doesn't mean exercise is out of the picture. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons offers these guidelines: Your doctor may have restrictions on your exercise regimen, so always consult your doctor before you exercise after surgery. Until your doctor says it's OK, don't jog, ski, run or do other exercises that put the replaced joint under stress. Opt for less-stressful exercises such as swimming, doubles tennis, golf and biking. Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement

New Treatment Shows Promise for Crippling Knee Arthritis

Posted 24 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 24, 2016 – For those who suffer debilitating arthritis in their knees, researchers report in a small study that just one injection of stem cells can reduce pain and inflammation. The idea is experimental: Extract stem cells from a patient's own body fat – cells known for their ability to differentiate and perform any number of regenerative functions – and inject them directly into the damaged knee joint. "While the goal of this small study was to evaluate the safety of using a patient's own stem cells to treat osteoarthritis of the knee, it also showed that one group of patients experienced improvements in pain and function," noted Dr. Anthony Atala, director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, in Winston-Salem, N.C. He was not involved in the study. "In fact, most of the patients who had previously scheduled total knee replacement surgery decided to ... Read more

Related support groups: Osteoarthritis, Knee Joint Replacement, Diagnosis and Investigation

Refugees Aren't Getting Needed Surgeries

Posted 3 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 2, 2016 – Millions of refugees aren't getting the surgery they need, researchers report. "When planning to take care of refugees, much thought is put into how to house and feed and clothe people who are far from home for circumstances often beyond their control. But surgery is a basic need and nobody talks about this," said Dr. Adam Kushner, leader of a new study conducted at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. An analysis of data from the United Nations and other sources estimates that the roughly 60 million refugees worldwide may need at least 2.8 million surgeries a year. But their circumstances make it difficult to receive that type of medical care, the researchers added. The types of surgeries required range from broken bones and hernia repair to cesarean sections, cleft lips, gallbladder removal and burn care, the study found. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Hiatal Hernia, Inguinal Hernia, Surgical Prophylaxis, Cesarean Section, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Knee Replacement Patients May Be Able to Hit the Shower Sooner

Posted 27 May 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 – Knee surgery patients are usually instructed to wait two weeks after surgery to take a shower to reduce the risk of infection. But a small new study suggests this may not be necessary. Researchers found no differences in bacterial swabs from those who waited two weeks to shower compared with those allowed to shower after about two days. That's no doubt welcome news to the many patients who've struggled to find a way to bathe without getting their incision wet. The study, led by Dr. Harold Rees, an orthopaedic surgeon at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Ill., followed 32 patients. Half were randomly assigned to shower after two weeks. The other half could shower as soon as their surgical dressing was removed – typically two days after surgery. None of the patients developed a post-operative infection, the study found. And, unsurprisingly, patients ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Knee Joint Replacement, Orthopedic Surgery, Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis after Knee Replacement Surgery

Tai Chi: Rx for Arthritic Knees

Posted 23 May 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 23, 2016 – Legions of arthritis sufferers try physical therapy and anti-inflammatory drugs to no avail. Now, a new study looks East for relief – to the martial art tai chi. Researchers concluded that tai chi offers an alternative to physical therapy for common knee osteoarthritis – and it might also boost well-being. This ancient Chinese exercise may particularly benefit overweight older adults, the researchers said. Heavier people are more likely to develop osteoarthritis than people with a healthy weight, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "This research strengthened the evidence that the effectiveness and durability of both tai chi and physical therapy extend to obese older adults with knee osteoarthritis," said Dr. Chenchen Wang. "Such people typically face limited options due to ineffectiveness of osteoarthritis treatments," Wang said. ... Read more

Related support groups: Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Osteoarthritis, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Acetaminophen, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Aleve, Mobic, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Motrin, Endocet, Excedrin

Getting Active After Knee Replacement Might Raise Hip Fracture Risk

Posted 18 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, April 16, 2016 – There could be a downside to knee replacement: As people get more active, their odds for hip and spinal fractures rise, a new study suggests. One expert wasn't surprised by the finding. While the exact reason for the increase in hip and spine fractures isn't clear, it's most likely due "to improved mobility and activity as a result of the knee replacement surgery," said Dr. Caroline Messer, who specializes in bone loss at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "In addition, patients who chose to have the surgery rather than conservative management of osteoarthritis may have been the same individuals who were determined to lead very active and therefore somewhat riskier lifestyles in the future," said Messer, who directs the hospital's Center for Pituitary and Neuroendocrine Disorders. Almost 720,000 total knee replacements are carried out in the United States ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Fracture, bone, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Prevention of Fractures

Injuries More Common in Teens Who Focus on Single Sport

Posted 28 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, March 26, 2016 – High school athletes who focus on a single sport may be at increased risk for knee and hip injuries, a new study suggests. "Make sure your children are getting breaks in competition," said study author David Bell, assistant professor in the Departments of Kinesiology and Orthopedics and Rehabilitation at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. "There are so many great aspects to sports participation and we don't want this information to scare athletes or parents – we just want them to be wise consumers and to participate as safely as possible," he said in a university news release. The study included more than 300 athletes at two high schools, one large and one small. About 36 percent of the athletes had high levels of sports specialization. Nearly 29 percent had moderate specialization, and about 35 percent had low specialization, the researchers said. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Hip Replacement, Knee Joint Replacement, Fracture, bone, Orthopedic Surgery

Birth Control Pills Linked to Fewer Severe Knee Injuries in Teen Girls

Posted 23 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 23, 2016 – Teen girls who take birth control pills may be less likely to seriously injure their knees than those who don't take the pill, a new study suggests. "Young athletes currently use birth control pills for various reasons, including more predictable cycles and lighter periods," said study author Aaron Gray, an M.D./Ph.D. student at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. "Injury risk reduction could potentially be added to that list," he said, if future studies confirm what the new study found. The study did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship between birth control pills and knee injuries. The researchers only found an association between these factors. Female athletes are up to twice as likely to suffer an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury as male athletes, the study authors said. The ACL connects the top and bottom parts of the knee. ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Plan B, Surgery, Emergency Contraception, Mirena, Sprintec, NuvaRing, Provera, Implanon, Nexplanon, Depo-Provera, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Tri-Sprintec, Yasmin, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, Plan B One-Step, TriNessa

Acetaminophen Won't Help Arthritis Pain, Study Finds

Posted 18 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 17, 2016 – Acetaminophen – commonly known as Tylenol in the United States – isn't an effective choice for relieving osteoarthritis pain in the hip or knee, or for improving joint function, a new study finds. Although the drug rated slightly better than placebo in studies, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or diclofenac are better choices for short-term pain relief, the researchers said. "Regardless of dose, the prescription drug diclofenac is the most effective drug among painkillers in terms of improving pain and function in osteoarthritis," said lead researcher Dr. Sven Trelle. He's co-director of clinical trials at the University of Bern in Switzerland. However, even diclofenac comes with side effects. "If you are thinking of using a painkiller for osteoarthritis, you should consider diclofenac," Trelle said, but also ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Osteoarthritis, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Acetaminophen, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Aleve, Mobic, Voltaren Gel, Paracetamol, Fioricet, Motrin

Botox-Like Injection Might Ease Runners' Knee Pain

Posted 23 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 22, 2016 – A Botox-like injection, added to physical therapy, may relieve a type of knee pain that's common in runners, cyclists and other active people, a new study suggests. The condition – called lateral patellofemoral overload syndrome (LPOS) – affects more than one in eight people who regularly exercise, the British research team explained. The condition causes pain in the front and side of the knee joint, and healing can be a challenge, experts said. "Knee pain in runners and cyclists is often difficult to treat," said Dr. Victor Khabie, chief of sports medicine at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mount Kisco, N.Y. "Most will respond well to traditional therapy, but some will continue to have pain." According to the study authors, prior research has shown that 80 percent of people with LPOS have ongoing symptoms after undergoing conventional treatment, and 74 ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Chronic Pain, Botox, Knee Joint Replacement, Breakthrough Pain, Dysport

Health Tip: Using a Knee Brace

Posted 8 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

-- A knee brace offers support and stability for an injured or weak knee. But it must be worn properly. The American Academy of Family Physicians offers these guidelines: Your doctor may suggest wearing a knee brace during sports. Put the brace on properly, so the hinges line up with the bend of the knee. Make sure the fasteners are properly applied around the leg. As you exercise, check the brace occasionally to make sure that it hasn't slipped out of position. There are different types of knee braces. They may be recommended after knee surgery or an injury, such as a torn ligament. Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Knee Joint Replacement, Joint Infection

Obesity Linked to More Severe Bone, Joint Injuries

Posted 4 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 4, 2015 – Obesity complicates the treatment of broken bones and other major joint injuries, a new study suggests. "Overall, this study found an association between obesity and increased rates of lower-extremity injuries and orthopedic surgery," said lead author and orthopedic surgeon Dr. Heather Licht. However, the study did not prove that obesity causes orthopedic injuries and related surgeries. For the study, researchers from Baylor Scott & White Health in Temple, Texas, analyzed data from 300 patients treated for multiple orthopedic injuries at U.S. trauma centers between 2006 and 2011. The investigators found that 72 percent of obese patients required surgery, compared with about 55 percent of non-obese patients. The more obese a patient was, the greater the likelihood of surgery, the study authors reported. While 67 percent of patients with the lowest level of obesity ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Knee Joint Replacement, Fracture, bone, Compression Fracture of Vertebral Column, Joint Infection

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