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Retail Prices of Dermatology Drugs Skyrocket

Posted 25 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25, 2015 – Patients using prescription creams, gels, sprays and pills for skin conditions may shell out substantially more at the pharmacy than they did just six years ago, a new study suggests. Between 2009 and 2015, retail prices of brand-name dermatologic drugs rose 401 percent, on average, study authors reported Nov. 25 in JAMA Dermatology. Even generics have succumbed to price inflation, up 279 percent between 2011 and 2014, based on the drugs surveyed. Price increases for skin treatments far outpaced the general inflation rate of 11 percent during the six-year study period, the researchers said. "Cancer drugs were the worst in terms of the numbers" – up 1,240 percent or nearly $11,000 over the six-year study period – primarily because of two medicines, said Dr. Steven Rosenberg, voluntary professor of dermatology at the University of Miami Miller School of ... Read more

Related support groups: Monistat, RID, Monistat 3, Eczema, Voltaren Gel, Monistat 7, Dermatitis, Maintain, Clobetasol, Contact Dermatitis, Bactroban, Mupirocin, Lidoderm, Therapeutic, Hypercare, Drysol, Sulfur, Fluocinonide, Efudex, Retin-A

Experts Urge Caution With Popular Painkillers After FDA Warning

Posted 10 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 10, 2015 – People who regularly reach for widely used painkillers like ibuprofen and naproxen may need to think carefully before they pop those pills, heart experts say. Mounting evidence has shown that chronic use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can raise a person's risk of heart attack and stroke. The evidence is strong enough that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday ordered drug makers to toughen warning labels on both prescription and over-the-counter NSAIDs. The tougher warning does not include aspirin, an NSAID that has been shown to lower heart risks in some patients. Most people who occasionally take ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve) for infrequent headaches or pain don't have to worry, as long as they follow the dosage directions on the bottle, said Dr. Richard Chazal, president-elect of the American College of ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Advil, Celebrex, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Aleve, Mobic, Voltaren Gel, Motrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Etodolac, Vicoprofen, Nabumetone, Flector, Advil PM, Flector Patch

FDA Strengthens Heart Attack, Stroke Warning for Popular Painkillers

Posted 10 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 9, 2015 – The U.S Food and Drug Administration on Thursday strengthened the warning labels for widely used painkillers like ibuprofen and naproxen, saying they can increase the risk of heart attack or stroke. The FDA is asking people to think carefully about their use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), particularly if they've already had a heart attack, according to a consumer update on the agency's website. The agency said it is taking this action based on recent data that shows the risk of heart attack or stroke can increase even after using NSAIDs for a short time. "They used to say they might cause risk of heart attack or stroke. Now we are saying they do cause increased risk of heart attack and stroke," FDA spokesman Eric Pahon told NBC News. In particular, people should avoid taking multiple products that contain NSAIDs, according to the revised FDA ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Advil, Celebrex, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Aleve, Mobic, Voltaren Gel, Motrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Etodolac, Vicoprofen, Nabumetone, Flector, Flector Patch, Advil PM, Naprosyn

FDA Medwatch Alert: Non-aspirin Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs): Drug Safety Communication - FDA Strengthens Warning of Increased Chance of Heart Attack or Stroke

Posted 10 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

[Posted 07/09/2015] ISSUE:  FDA is strengthening an existing label warning that non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increase the chance of a heart attack or stroke. Based on FDAs comprehensive review of new safety information, FDA is requiring updates to the drug labels of all prescription NSAIDs. As is the case with current prescription NSAID labels, the Drug Facts labels of over-the-counter (OTC) non-aspirin NSAIDs already contain information on heart attack and stroke risk. FDA will also request updates to the OTC non-aspirin NSAID Drug Facts labels. See the FDA Drug Safety Communication (Table 1) for a list of non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug products. Prescription NSAID labels will be revised to reflect the following information: The risk of heart attack or stroke can occur as early as the first weeks of using an NSAID. The risk may increase ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Advil, Celebrex, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Aleve, Mobic, Voltaren Gel, Motrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Etodolac, Vicoprofen, Nabumetone, Flector, Advil PM, Flector Patch, Ketorolac

When to Ice, When to Heat

Posted 11 May 2015 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, May 10, 2015 – Athletes aren't always sure whether to use heat or ice on injuries and aches and pains, so here is some advice from experts. If you suffer a sudden sports injury, you should follow a recovery program known as RICE: rest, ice, compression, elevation. "Elevation is probably the most important thing because it limits the amount of blood flow to the area and the amount of swelling," Dr. Scott Lynch, director of sports medicine at Penn State Hershey Medical Center, said in a center news release. Applying cold is important because it helps narrow blood vessels, preventing blood from accumulating at the injury site and causing too much inflammation and swelling that can delay healing. Icing an injury for the first 48 to 72 hours reduces the amount of secondary tissue damage and can also ease pain, said Dr. Cayce Onks, a family and sports medicine doctor at the medical ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Aleve, Mobic, Voltaren Gel, Motrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Tendonitis, Fracture, bone, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Flector, Flector Patch, Frozen Shoulder

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