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How to Beat Jet Lag This Summer Vacation

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 19, 2017 – Flying across time zones to your vacation destination this summer? You can't prevent jet lag, but you can minimize it, a sleep specialist says. "Anyone who has ever suffered jet lag knows firsthand that our bodies are persistent in how they keep track of time," said Dr. Alon Avidan, director of the Sleep Disorders Center at the University of California, Los Angeles. "During jet lag, a rapid shift in the light-dark cycle temporarily disrupts one's normal sleep-wake pattern, and our bodies become desynchronized," he explained in a university news release. Eastbound travel usually causes difficulty falling asleep, while westbound travel makes it harder to stay asleep. Avidan said the most effective ways to speed your adjustment to the new time zone are low-dose melatonin (0.5 mg or less) and light exposure. To shift your body clock to a later time when traveling ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Jet Lag

Health Tip: Better Sleep, a Better Life

Posted 27 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Sleep quality affects the quality of your life, both physically and emotionally. The National Sleep Foundation says getting enough quality sleep helps you: Improve your ability to learn and focus. Feel happier and less cranky. Improve productivity. Feel less hungry. Improve your risk of infection and chronic illness. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Narcolepsy, Nightmares, Sleep Apnea, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Night Terrors, Drowsiness, Hypersomnia, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Jet Lag, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

How to Keep a Spring in Your Step With Daylight Saving Time

Posted 9 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 9, 2017 – Clocks will spring ahead one hour with the time change on Sunday morning, but medical experts have plenty of advice on how to weather that lost hour of sleep. "'Gaining' an hour in the fall is much easier for our bodies than 'losing' an hour in the spring," said Dr. Praveen Rudraraju, medical director of the Center for Sleep Medicine at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mount Kisco, N.Y. Starting a few days before the time change, people can prepare themselves by going to bed 15 or 20 minutes earlier each night, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. But it can still be hard to adjust to the switch afterwards, sleep specialists said. "In fact, it may take some people up to a week to get used to the new time change," Rudraraju said. "Though it may be tempting to stay up an extra hour, one of the best ways to fight the effects of daylight saving ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Fatigue, Melatonin, Sleep Apnea, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Bio-Melatonin, Melatonin Time Release, Jet Lag, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder, Calcium Carbonate/melatonin/pyridoxine, VesPro Melatonin, Health Aid Melatonin, SGard

How Much Melatonin Is Really in That Supplement?

Posted 2 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 1, 2017 – If you take melatonin supplements to help you nod off, take note: Many brands are inaccurately labeled, containing much less – or much more – of the sleep hormone than indicated, a new study reports. What's more, a laboratory analysis found that eight of 31 melatonin supplements contained significant quantities of the drug serotonin, which is used to treat neurological disorders, the researchers said. "There does exist a safety concern," said study co-author Praveen Saxena of the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada. He directs of the Gosling Research Institute for Plant Preservation at the university. Scientists who analyzed the sleep-hormone supplements purchased in Canada said more than 70 percent were misleadingly labeled. That is, the contents didn't fall within 10 percent of the breakdown claimed on the label. Melatonin content varied from as ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Melatonin, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Drowsiness, Hypersomnia, Bio-Melatonin, Melatonin Time Release, Jet Lag, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder, VesPro Melatonin, Calcium Carbonate/melatonin/pyridoxine, Health Aid Melatonin, SGard

Health Tip: Short on Sleep?

Posted 22 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- It may be tough to find enough hours to get everything checked off of your daily to-do list. But giving up sleep to get more done may do more harm than good. The National Sleep Foundation explains how insufficient sleep affects you: Reduces cognitive function, making it more difficult to remember, focus, learn new things, solve problems and make decisions. Increases body's reaction to stress. Brings on feelings of irritability and moodiness. Reduces reaction time, affecting school or work performance and raising your risk of a car accident. Increases risk of developing high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. Makes you more susceptible to illness. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Narcolepsy, Nightmares, Sleep Apnea, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Drowsiness, Hypersomnia, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Jet Lag, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

Skimp on Sleep and You Just May Wind Up Sick

Posted 9 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 9, 2017 – Ever noticed that when you try to "do it all," the one thing you can count on is getting sick? Now, a new study suggests why: if you don't get enough sleep, your immune system seems to suffer. The finding comes from a study of 11 pairs of twin adults. Each pair of twins had significantly different sleeping routines. The researchers found that the twin who regularly slept less also turned out to be the one with the less potent immune system. "This is the first study to show suppressed immune gene expression in chronic sleep deprivation," said study lead author Dr. Nathaniel Watson. He's a professor of neurology at the University of Washington Medicine Sleep Center in Seattle. That, added Watson, could explain why prior research has shown that "if you expose a sleep-deprived person to a rhinovirus they are more likely to get the common cold than a person who has ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Diazepam, Temazepam, Cold Symptoms, Librium, Restoril, Xanax XR, Sore Throat, Sleep Apnea, Oxazepam, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome

Jet Lag a Drag on Pro Baseball Players

Posted 23 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 23, 2017 – Skipping across time zones might be more than just tiring for pro baseball players: The resulting jet lag may actually harm their performance on the field, a new study suggests. Researchers analyzed data from more than 40,000 Major League Baseball games played over 20 years. The conclusion: jet lag may have a significant impact on players. The Northwestern University researchers said they found that jet lag slowed the base running of home teams but not away teams. And both home and away pitchers gave up more home runs when jet-lagged. "Jet lag does impair the performance of Major League Baseball players. The negative effects of jet lag we found are subtle, but they are detectable and significant. And they happen on both offense and defense and for both home and away teams, often in surprising ways," study leader Ravi Allada, a circadian rhythms expert, said in a ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Ambien, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, BuSpar, Diazepam, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zolpidem, Buspirone, Melatonin, Temazepam, Diphenhydramine

Health Tip: Make Sleep a Priority

Posted 17 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Are you sabotaging your own attempts to get more shuteye? The National Sleep Foundation suggests: Identify and correct any unhealthy sleep habits. Instead of checking your smartphone just before bed, do something relaxing, such as meditating. Prepare your bed well before bedtime. Wash and change bedsheets regularly. Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Ambien, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, BuSpar, Diazepam, Benadryl, Narcolepsy, Hydroxyzine, Zolpidem, Buspirone, Melatonin, Temazepam

Health Tip: Cutting Out Caffeine?

Posted 13 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

-- If you're not getting enough sleep, you're not alone. But you don't need to turn to caffeine to help you feel less groggy. The National Sleep Foundation recommends: Before bed avoid alcohol, which can affect sleep. Set a sleep schedule, waking and going to sleep at the same time each day. Skip the snooze button. Set the alarm for the time you truly need to wake up. Open the curtains to let in natural sunlight as soon as you wake. Get daily exercise. Eat a nutritious, balanced breakfast. Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Ambien, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, BuSpar, Diazepam, Benadryl, Narcolepsy, Hydroxyzine, Zolpidem, Buspirone, Melatonin, Temazepam

Health Tip: 5 Things to Help You Sleep Soundly

Posted 3 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

-- If your room is too bright, noisy or full of activity when you travel, any of these could prevent you from getting needed rest. The National Sleep Foundation recommends: Buy an eye mask that fits well, feels comfortable and helps block out light. Look for one with molded eye cups if the mask rubs against your eyes. Get a small, travel-sized pillow. Many travel pillows are shaped to fit around your neck. Bring your own warm, soft blanket. Buy a pair of ear plugs. They're available in a range of features, from the basics to those that play white noise and adjust pressure in your ears. Get some lavender-scented hand cream. The relaxing scent may help you sleep. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Jet Lag

Web-Based Help for Insomnia Shows Promise

Posted 30 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 – People find help for all sorts of maladies online. Now, insomnia might be one of them. A web-based interactive program may help chronically sleepless individuals get needed shuteye without taking medication or spending time on a therapist's couch, a new study suggests. The six-week program uses cognitive behavior therapy techniques – a standard treatment for insomnia – to help reset sleep patterns, the researchers said. People who participated in the program "experienced significant and clinically meaningful improvements in their sleep, compared to those who were given online patient education," said lead researcher Lee Ritterband. Moreover, the results are "similar to outcomes reported in trials that included face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy," said Ritterband. He is a professor at the University of Virginia School of Medicine's department of ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Diazepam, Temazepam, Librium, Restoril, Xanax XR, Sleep Apnea, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Oxazepam, Halcion, Serax

Health Tip: Find a Fun Alarm Clock

Posted 6 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If you have a tough time getting out of bed in the morning, a fun alarm clock that eases the transition into your day may help. Try these suggestions from the National Sleep Foundation: Look for an alarm clock that's functional, not just pretty. Make sure the buttons are easy to find when you're groggy first thing in the morning. Skip alarm clocks that emit bright blue light that can interfere with sleep. Opt for one that uses softer amber, orange or red to help you sleep more soundly. Choose an alarm clock that wakes you with a sound that you enjoy, whether that's the news, your favorite music or nature sounds. Consider one that gradually increases the volume to gently rouse you. Look for fun features that make sure you won't oversleep. Some alarm clocks have a light that turns on slowly at the time you should wake. Others vibrate the bed to help wake you. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Narcolepsy, Nightmares, Sleep Apnea, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Drowsiness, Hypersomnia, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder, Jet Lag, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

Brain Relies on Two Timekeepers for Sleep

Posted 12 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 12, 2016 – Both an internal "clock" and an internal "hourglass" affect how different parts of your brain respond to sleep deprivation, a new study shows. The Belgian researchers said these findings could eventually aid in the understanding of sleep disorders, and help folks who work night shifts or those with jet lag. The study involved 33 healthy young people who volunteered to stay awake for 42 hours and have their mental sharpness tracked along the way. Sleep scientists from the University of Liege used MRI scans to chart the volunteers' brain activity as they performed tests of attention and reaction time. Not surprisingly, their performances dulled as their sleep deprivation worsened. But the brain scans revealed a complicated interaction between two basic biological processes: the body's central "circadian rhythm," which pushes people to be awake and active during ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Narcolepsy, Nightmares, Sleep Apnea, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Night Terrors, Sleep Paralysis, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Drowsiness, Hypersomnia, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Cataplexy, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder, Jet Lag, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

Could Slight Brain Zap During Sleep Boost Memory?

Posted 28 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 28, 2016 – Stimulating a targeted area of the brain with small doses of weak electricity while you sleep may enhance your ability to remember what you learned the night before, new research finds. The new procedure is called transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS). "We work with the brain, that's really unique about what we do. We listen in to brain activity and can boost what the brain already wants to do," said the study's senior author, Flavio Frohlich. He's an assistant professor of psychiatry at the Neuroscience Center at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. While you sleep your brain is not idle, but is actively storing things you learned during the day for later use. Stimulating the brain enhances what the brain is already doing naturally, Frohlich said. During sleep, electrical brain activity oscillates, and can be seen as waves on an ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Sleep Apnea, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Diagnosis and Investigation, Jet Lag, Head Imaging, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

Dodge the Jet Lag, Enjoy Your Trip

Posted 14 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 13, 2016 – People crossing time zones may assume jet lag is something they have to endure – like airport delays and lost luggage. But there are several ways travelers can prepare for and minimize jet lag's troubling effects, a sleep specialist says. First, flying from west to east, such as from the United States to Europe, will result in worse jet lag than the reverse trip, explained David Earnest, who studies circadian rhythms at Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine. "You will always be hit harder by jet lag when making a four- to six-hour time jump eastbound," Earnest said in a university news release. "This is because our body clocks are trying to advance to an earlier time, which is not as easy as adjusting to a later time gap," he said. Earnest provided the following recommendations on how to ease jet lag: Catch the red eye. Sleeping through an ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Jet Lag

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