Skip to Content

Join the 'Jet Lag' group to help and get support from people like you.

Jet Lag News

Jet Lag a Drag on Pro Baseball Players

Posted 20 hours ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 23, 2017 – Skipping across time zones might be more than just tiring for pro baseball players: The resulting jet lag may actually harm their performance on the field, a new study suggests. Researchers analyzed data from more than 40,000 Major League Baseball games played over 20 years. The conclusion: jet lag may have a significant impact on players. The Northwestern University researchers said they found that jet lag slowed the base running of home teams but not away teams. And both home and away pitchers gave up more home runs when jet-lagged. "Jet lag does impair the performance of Major League Baseball players. The negative effects of jet lag we found are subtle, but they are detectable and significant. And they happen on both offense and defense and for both home and away teams, often in surprising ways," study leader Ravi Allada, a circadian rhythms expert, said in a ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Ambien, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, BuSpar, Diazepam, Benadryl, Zolpidem, Hydroxyzine, Buspirone, Melatonin, Temazepam, Diphenhydramine

Health Tip: Make Sleep a Priority

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Are you sabotaging your own attempts to get more shuteye? The National Sleep Foundation suggests: Identify and correct any unhealthy sleep habits. Instead of checking your smartphone just before bed, do something relaxing, such as meditating. Prepare your bed well before bedtime. Wash and change bedsheets regularly. Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Ambien, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, BuSpar, Diazepam, Benadryl, Zolpidem, Hydroxyzine, Buspirone, Melatonin, Temazepam, Nightmares

Health Tip: Cutting Out Caffeine?

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

-- If you're not getting enough sleep, you're not alone. But you don't need to turn to caffeine to help you feel less groggy. The National Sleep Foundation recommends: Before bed avoid alcohol, which can affect sleep. Set a sleep schedule, waking and going to sleep at the same time each day. Skip the snooze button. Set the alarm for the time you truly need to wake up. Open the curtains to let in natural sunlight as soon as you wake. Get daily exercise. Eat a nutritious, balanced breakfast. Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Ambien, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, BuSpar, Diazepam, Benadryl, Zolpidem, Hydroxyzine, Buspirone, Melatonin, Temazepam, Diphenhydramine

Health Tip: 5 Things to Help You Sleep Soundly

Posted 3 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

-- If your room is too bright, noisy or full of activity when you travel, any of these could prevent you from getting needed rest. The National Sleep Foundation recommends: Buy an eye mask that fits well, feels comfortable and helps block out light. Look for one with molded eye cups if the mask rubs against your eyes. Get a small, travel-sized pillow. Many travel pillows are shaped to fit around your neck. Bring your own warm, soft blanket. Buy a pair of ear plugs. They're available in a range of features, from the basics to those that play white noise and adjust pressure in your ears. Get some lavender-scented hand cream. The relaxing scent may help you sleep. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Jet Lag

Web-Based Help for Insomnia Shows Promise

Posted 30 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 – People find help for all sorts of maladies online. Now, insomnia might be one of them. A web-based interactive program may help chronically sleepless individuals get needed shuteye without taking medication or spending time on a therapist's couch, a new study suggests. The six-week program uses cognitive behavior therapy techniques – a standard treatment for insomnia – to help reset sleep patterns, the researchers said. People who participated in the program "experienced significant and clinically meaningful improvements in their sleep, compared to those who were given online patient education," said lead researcher Lee Ritterband. Moreover, the results are "similar to outcomes reported in trials that included face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy," said Ritterband. He is a professor at the University of Virginia School of Medicine's department of ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Diazepam, Temazepam, Sleep Apnea, Librium, Drowsiness, Restoril, Xanax XR, Oxazepam, Halcion, Serax

Health Tip: Find a Fun Alarm Clock

Posted 6 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If you have a tough time getting out of bed in the morning, a fun alarm clock that eases the transition into your day may help. Try these suggestions from the National Sleep Foundation: Look for an alarm clock that's functional, not just pretty. Make sure the buttons are easy to find when you're groggy first thing in the morning. Skip alarm clocks that emit bright blue light that can interfere with sleep. Opt for one that uses softer amber, orange or red to help you sleep more soundly. Choose an alarm clock that wakes you with a sound that you enjoy, whether that's the news, your favorite music or nature sounds. Consider one that gradually increases the volume to gently rouse you. Look for fun features that make sure you won't oversleep. Some alarm clocks have a light that turns on slowly at the time you should wake. Others vibrate the bed to help wake you. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Sleep Apnea, Drowsiness, Narcolepsy, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Hypersomnia, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder, Jet Lag, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

Brain Relies on Two Timekeepers for Sleep

Posted 12 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 12, 2016 – Both an internal "clock" and an internal "hourglass" affect how different parts of your brain respond to sleep deprivation, a new study shows. The Belgian researchers said these findings could eventually aid in the understanding of sleep disorders, and help folks who work night shifts or those with jet lag. The study involved 33 healthy young people who volunteered to stay awake for 42 hours and have their mental sharpness tracked along the way. Sleep scientists from the University of Liege used MRI scans to chart the volunteers' brain activity as they performed tests of attention and reaction time. Not surprisingly, their performances dulled as their sleep deprivation worsened. But the brain scans revealed a complicated interaction between two basic biological processes: the body's central "circadian rhythm," which pushes people to be awake and active during ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Sleep Apnea, Drowsiness, Narcolepsy, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Night Terrors, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Sleep Paralysis, Hypersomnia, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Cataplexy, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder, Jet Lag, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

Could Slight Brain Zap During Sleep Boost Memory?

Posted 28 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 28, 2016 – Stimulating a targeted area of the brain with small doses of weak electricity while you sleep may enhance your ability to remember what you learned the night before, new research finds. The new procedure is called transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS). "We work with the brain, that's really unique about what we do. We listen in to brain activity and can boost what the brain already wants to do," said the study's senior author, Flavio Frohlich. He's an assistant professor of psychiatry at the Neuroscience Center at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. While you sleep your brain is not idle, but is actively storing things you learned during the day for later use. Stimulating the brain enhances what the brain is already doing naturally, Frohlich said. During sleep, electrical brain activity oscillates, and can be seen as waves on an ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Sleep Apnea, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Diagnosis and Investigation, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Jet Lag, Head Imaging, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

Dodge the Jet Lag, Enjoy Your Trip

Posted 14 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 13, 2016 – People crossing time zones may assume jet lag is something they have to endure – like airport delays and lost luggage. But there are several ways travelers can prepare for and minimize jet lag's troubling effects, a sleep specialist says. First, flying from west to east, such as from the United States to Europe, will result in worse jet lag than the reverse trip, explained David Earnest, who studies circadian rhythms at Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine. "You will always be hit harder by jet lag when making a four- to six-hour time jump eastbound," Earnest said in a university news release. "This is because our body clocks are trying to advance to an earlier time, which is not as easy as adjusting to a later time gap," he said. Earnest provided the following recommendations on how to ease jet lag: Catch the red eye. Sleeping through an ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Jet Lag

Health Tip: Sleep Soundly Away From Home

Posted 1 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

-- It may be difficult to get a good night's sleep when you're away from home. The National Sleep Foundation has suggestions to help make it easier: Pack your own pillow. Bring a white noise machine and a pair of ear plugs that block noise of at least 65 decibels. Invest in a sleep mask to make sure bright light doesn't keep you awake. Maintain the same bed and wake schedule as you do at home. Don't overeat or drink too much alcohol. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Jet Lag

Health Tip: Plan Ahead to Minimize Jet Lag

Posted 27 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

-- While it's difficult to adjust to a new time zone, a little prep work can make the transition easier. The American Academy of Family Physicians advises: Make sure you are well rested before leaving. Avoid drinking alcohol. Stick to well-balanced, healthy meals, and avoid overeating. Get regular exercise. If you use medication to help you sleep, use it for as short a period as possible. Go to sleep and wake up based on the new time zone as quickly as possible. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Jet Lag

Time Zone Changes Give Edge to Athletes From West

Posted 17 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 17, 2016 – Traveling across several time zones can be draining for anyone. So, how do professional athletes manage to turn around and compete in games after traveling from one coast to another? Apparently, not always that well, a new study says. And that's especially true when teams are traveling from an earlier time zone to a later one. When professional sports teams in North America travel west to east, they have a higher winning percentage than those traveling east to west, researchers said. The study authors looked at five years of regular season games for the National Basketball Association, the National Football League and the National Hockey League. They compared game outcomes and the direction of travel for all the teams. The results showed an advantage for teams in all three leagues traveling west to east, but the winning effect was most significant in the NBA. ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Jet Lag

Health Tip: Sleep Well During Travel

Posted 9 May 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Traveling for work or pleasure shouldn't involve sleepless nights. While on the road, the National Sleep Foundation suggests you pack: A non-backlit E-reader to help you read, relax and wind down. An eye mask to help block out light. A comfortable pair of earplugs. Or use a pair of noise-canceling headphones. A C-shaped neck pillow made of memory foam to support your head and neck. A travel-sized white noise machine. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Jet Lag

Health Tip: Selecting a Sleep Mask

Posted 3 May 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Bright light can interrupt sleep quickly, so many people use a sleep mask. The National Sleep Foundation suggests how to choose the right one: Consider whether you need a sleep mask that provides total blackout, or one that provides darker conditions in a room that's already fairly dark. Look for a mask that fits across the bridge of the nose. Invest in a quality mask with a nose flap to help block more light and provide a better fit. Opt for a mask with cavities that alleviate pressure around your eyes. Find the right fabric that feels comfortable, is easy to wash and doesn't trigger allergies. Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Ambien, Valium, Fatigue, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, BuSpar, Diazepam, Benadryl, Zolpidem, Hydroxyzine, Buspirone, Melatonin, Temazepam, Nightmares

While Travelers Sleep, Brain Patrols for Danger

Posted 21 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 21, 2016 – When you sleep in a new place, a part of your brain remains alert for potential threats, a new study finds. The findings might help explain why many people sleep poorly on their first night in a hotel, a sleep laboratory or other new location. "In Japan they say, 'if you change your pillow, you can't sleep,' " study corresponding author Yuka Sasaki, research associate professor of cognitive linguistic and psychological sciences at Brown University in Rhode Island, said in a university news release. "You don't sleep very well in a new place. We all know about it." The researchers measured brain activity in 35 people over two nights of slumber in a sleep lab, a week apart. Among all the participants on the first night, one particular network in the brain's left hemisphere showed greater activity than in the right hemisphere during a deep sleep phase called ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Nightmares, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Jet Lag

Page 1 2 3 Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Sleep Disorders

Related Drug Support Groups

melatonin, armodafinil, Melatonin Time Release, Bio-Melatonin, SGard, VesPro Melatonin, Health Aid Melatonin