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Related terms: Cerebral hemorrhage, Hemorrhage, intracerebral, Hypertensive hemorrhage, Intracerebral hemorrhage, Stroke, hemorrhagic

Study Ties Some Migraines to Artery Tears in Neck, Raising Stroke Risk

Posted 7 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 6, 2017 – Some younger adults who suffer migraines may be at risk for tears in their neck arteries, which can increase the chances of a stroke, a new study suggests. Exactly what triggers these vessel tears is not clear, the researchers added. However, study author Dr. Alessandro Pezzini stressed that the probability that migraine sufferers would develop this condition – called arterial dissection – is still quite low. "Overall, migraine is a benign condition in the great majority of affected individuals," said Pezzini, a professor of neurology at the Universita degli Studi di Brescia in Italy. Of the nearly 2,500 stroke patients studied, aged 18 to 45, only 13 percent had strokes related to neck artery tears. This group was more likely to have high cholesterol, diabetes or be current smokers. When the researchers looked closer at the pattern of migraines linked with ... Read more

Related support groups: Migraine, Migraine Prevention, Migraine Prophylaxis, Peripheral Arterial Disease, Intracranial Hemorrhage, Trochleitis

For Stroke Survivors, Exercise Is Good for the Brain: Review

Posted 23 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 – A structured exercise program can help stroke survivors recover not only physically but mentally as well, a new review says. The analysis of 13 clinical trials found that exercise therapy was generally good for stroke patients' "cognition." Cognition refers to vital mental processes such as thinking, learning, understanding and remembering. A stroke, which cuts off blood flow to the brain, can impair those abilities. The findings bolster what experts have long believed: Exercise can aid stroke recovery in multiple ways. "This isn't new," said Daniel Lackland, a spokesman for the American Stroke Association who was not involved in the research. "We've known that exercise is good after a stroke." But, he said, the findings offer more clarity on exactly what works. They suggest, for example, that a combination of moderate aerobic exercise and training in ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Transient Ischemic Attack, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Diagnosis and Investigation, Intracranial Hemorrhage

Bleeding Strokes Take Heavy Toll on Brain

Posted 23 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 – Survivors of the most deadly type of stroke face a higher risk for developing depression and dementia, new research suggests. Often called "bleeding strokes," hemorrhagic strokes occur when a blood vessel ruptures and leaks blood into the brain. Conversely, the more common ischemic stroke happens after a blood vessel is blocked in the brain. "Our study changes the way we look at depression after a hemorrhagic stroke," said study author Dr. Alessandro Biffi, a neurologist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. "Depression is not just an isolated phenomenon following a hemorrhagic stroke," said Biffi, who is also director of the hospital's Aging and Brain Health Research Group. "It may identify those who are likely to develop dementia, and this is important when these patients are evaluated, particularly in outpatient care settings," he said. Biffi and ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Insulin Resistance, Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertensive Emergency, Intracranial Hemorrhage, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Head Imaging

After Wives Suffer Stroke, Husbands Adapt to Caregiving Role

Posted 22 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 – Being thrust into the role of caring for a spouse or partner who's had a stroke can be terribly unsettling. But in a small study, men reported more successes than problems in their first year of caregiving. A majority of men in the study (54 percent) worked full-time while caring for their spouse and assuming household tasks, such as cooking, cleaning and paying the bills. They spent two to 16 hours a day giving care, the study found. Despite the upheaval to their lives, the men seemed to rise to the occasion, the researchers reported. "Their successes were building blocks in supporting their partners and, in most cases, the successes made their relationships stronger," said Linda Pierce, the study's lead author. Pierce is a professor at the University of Toledo College of Nursing. In the United States, more women than men have strokes each year. It is the ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Ischemic Stroke, Transient Ischemic Attack, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Intracranial Hemorrhage

A Lengthy, Stable Marriage May Boost Stroke Survival

Posted 14 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14, 2016 – Stroke patients may have better odds of surviving if they're in a long-term stable marriage, a new study suggests. Researchers found that among more than 2,300 stroke sufferers, those who'd been "continuously" married had a better chance of surviving – versus both lifelong singles and people who'd been divorced or widowed. The long-term marrieds' outlook was better even compared to people who'd gotten remarried after divorcing or losing a spouse. The reasons for the findings aren't completely clear, and the study doesn't prove a cause-and-effect relationship. But researchers said the study highlights the potential importance of "social support" in stroke recovery. "This implies that the support of a lifelong partner has benefits," said Dr. Ralph Sacco, a professor of neurology at the University of Miami and a past president of the American Heart Association. ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Transient Ischemic Attack, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Intracranial Hemorrhage

Pradaxa Blood Thinner May Beat Warfarin After Bleeding Episode: Study

Posted 2 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 1, 2016 – Use of a blood thinner is routine for many heart patients, but these drugs come with a risk of episodes of excess bleeding. What, if any, anticoagulant (blood thinner) should these patients take after such episodes arise? A new study suggests that the blood thinner Pradaxa (dabigatran) may be a better choice than the standby drug warfarin in these cases. The reason: Pradaxa is less likely than warfarin to cause recurrent bleeding in patients who recently suffered a bleeding stroke or other major bleeding event, the researchers found. "Our results should encourage clinicians to seriously consider resuming anticoagulation among patients who survived a major bleeding event, particularly if the source of bleeding was identified and addressed," said study senior author Dr. Samir Saba. He's associate chief of cardiology at the University of Pittsburgh Heart and ... Read more

Related support groups: Bleeding Disorder, Warfarin, Coumadin, Ischemic Stroke, Xarelto, Pradaxa, Eliquis, Lovenox, Transient Ischemic Attack, Heparin, Rivaroxaban, Enoxaparin, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Apixaban, Fragmin, Clexane, Arixtra, Hep-Pak, Dalteparin, Jantoven

A Little Alcohol Each Day May Cut Your Risk of Stroke

Posted 24 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 24, 2016 – Light or moderate drinking may reduce the risk of one type of stroke but not another, while heavy drinking increases the risk of both types, a new study suggests. A research team from England and Sweden reviewed 25 studies as well as national data from Sweden. The investigators reported that consumption of up to two drinks a day was associated with a lower risk of ischemic stroke (blocked blood flow to the brain), but appeared to have no effect on the risk of bleeding (hemorrhagic) stroke. According to the American Stroke Association, about 87 percent of strokes are ischemic strokes, while the other 13 percent are hemorrhagic. High-to-heavy drinking (two to more than four drinks a day) was associated with an added risk of both types of stroke, according to the findings published online Nov. 23 in the journal BMC Medicine. "Our results showed that heavy ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Alcohol Dependence, Transient Ischemic Attack, Alcoholism, Hangover, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Intracranial Hemorrhage, Acute Alcohol Intoxication, Alcoholic Psychosis, Alcoholic Gastritis

New Electrical Stimulation Therapy Can Help Stroke Patients Move Paralyzed Hand

Posted 8 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 8, 2016 – A new form of electrical stimulation therapy can help rewire the brain and restore some dexterity to a hand that's been paralyzed by stroke, a new clinical trial shows. In the experimental therapy, patients use their good hand to help their brain regain control over the paralyzed hand, explained lead researcher Jayme Knutson, an assistant professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland. A sensor-laden glove worn on the patient's good hand sends signals to electric stimulators attached to the paralyzed hand, prompting the muscles in the inert hand to mirror the movements of the functioning hand, Knutson said. During physical therapy patients think about opening both hands at the same time, as the electrical stimulation forces the paralyzed hand to reflect the movements of the good hand. "We ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Transient Ischemic Attack, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Intracranial Hemorrhage

A Woman's Weight Has Complex Link to Stroke Risk

Posted 7 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7, 2016 – Excess weight may put women at increased risk for the most common form of stroke, but at lower risk for a less common stroke type, new research shows. Still, experts say the overall message remains the same: Keep trim to help keep stroke at bay. "While the results of this study may appear contradictory or somewhat confusing, the take-home message is that overall, obesity causes more harm than good," said Dr. Richard Libman, who reviewed the findings. He's vice chair of neurology at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park, N.Y. Specifically, the British study of more than 1.3 million women found that overweight and obese women were more likely to suffer an ischemic stroke, where blood flow is blocked to the brain. According to the American Stroke Association, it is by far the leading form of stroke, accounting for about 87 percent of cases. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Ischemic Stroke, Transient Ischemic Attack, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Intracranial Hemorrhage

Stroke Survivors Often Struggle With Depression

Posted 7 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7, 2016 – Stroke survivors face an increased risk of developing depression, a new study suggests. In the first three months after having a stroke, survivors' risk of depression was eight times higher than among people with no history of stroke, the Danish study found. "Depression is common in patients with stroke during the first year after diagnosis, and those with prior depression or severe stroke are especially at risk," wrote the study authors, led by Dr. Merete Osler of Copenhagen University. "Because a large number of deaths can be attributable to depression after stroke, clinicians should be aware of this risk," the authors concluded. Osler's team analyzed national databases in Denmark to compare depression risk among stroke survivors and people with no history of stroke (the "control" group). More than 25 percent of stroke survivors were diagnosed with ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Ischemic Stroke, Transient Ischemic Attack, Dysthymia, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Intracranial Hemorrhage

Adult-Onset Asthma Might Raise Heart Risks

Posted 24 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 24, 2016 – People who develop asthma when they're adults may have another health issue to worry about: an increased risk for heart disease and stroke. That's the finding from research involving almost 1,300 adults, average age 47, none of whom had heart disease at the beginning of the study. Of the participants, 111 had been diagnosed with asthma as adults – also known as "late-onset" asthma. Fifty-five more people had been diagnosed with asthma as children. The health of all the participants was tracked for 14 years. Researchers led by Dr. Matthew Tattersall published their findings Aug. 24 in the Journal of the American Heart Association. They found that people with late-onset asthma were 57 percent more likely than those with early-onset asthma and those without asthma to suffer heart attack, stroke, heart failure, angina and heart-related death. Based on the ... Read more

Related support groups: Asthma, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Asthma - Maintenance, Angina, Transient Ischemic Attack, Asthma - Acute, Myocardial Infarction, Intracranial Hemorrhage, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Mouse Study Suggests Stem Cells May Reverse Stroke Damage

Posted 22 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 22, 2016 – Research in mice shows it may be possible to reverse brain damage after a stroke. "No one in the stroke field has ever shown this, so I believe this is going to be the gold standard for future studies," said senior study author Berislav Zlokovic, director of the Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute at the University of Southern California. The experimental treatment combined transplanted neural stem cells with a protein called 3K3A-APC, the scientists said. In mice, the protein triggered the stem cells to become functioning neurons. But animal research does not always pan out in humans. "We showed that 3K3A-APC helps the grafted stem cells convert into neurons and make structural and functional connections with the host's nervous system," Zlokovic said in a university news release. Zlokovic is also a scientific founder of ZZ Biotech, a company that is developing ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Diagnosis and Investigation, Intracranial Hemorrhage

Regular Exercise: Antidote for Deadly Diseases?

Posted 10 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 9, 2016 – Getting lots of exercise may reduce your risk for five common diseases, a new report suggests. Researchers analyzed 174 studies published between 1980 and 2016, and found that people with high levels of weekly physical activity had a lower risk of breast cancer, colon cancer, diabetes, heart disease and stroke. The investigators used a formula called MET minutes to estimate how much activity offered the greatest health benefit. MET minutes measure how much energy you burn during physical activity. The study findings showed the biggest benefit at 3,000 to 4,000 MET minutes a week. A person could get 3,000 MET minutes by weaving activity into their daily routine – for example, 10 minutes of climbing stairs; 15 minutes of vacuuming; 20 minutes of gardening; 20 minutes of running; and 25 minutes of walking or cycling. "With population aging, and an increasing ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Breast Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Intracranial Hemorrhage

Study Links Sleep Problems to Stroke Risk, Recovery

Posted 3 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 3, 2016 – Too little or too much sleep may be a risk factor for stroke and might hinder recovery, new research suggests. The review of 29 previously published studies found that sleep disorders such as insomnia and sleep apnea are related to stroke risk and recovery. "Sleep disturbances are more prevalent in stroke patients, even more than in the general population," said lead researcher Dr. Dirk Hermann. He's a professor of neurology at University Hospital Essen in Germany. For example, evidence has existed for a number of years that sleep apnea, a sleep-related breathing disorder that is common in elderly patients and especially so in those who've had a stroke, is a risk factor for stroke, he said. Some studies show that sleep apnea was present before the stroke and may have contributed to the risk. Further, patients with more severe sleep apnea may have more severe ... Read more

Related support groups: Insomnia, Ischemic Stroke, Nightmares, Night Terrors, Transient Ischemic Attack, Sleep Apnea, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Intracranial Hemorrhage

Are Stroke Centers Life Savers?

Posted 26 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 – The odds of surviving a stroke are slightly better for patients treated at hospitals with a specialized stroke department, known as primary stroke centers, a new study finds. But that benefit was only seen if stroke patients got to a stroke center in less than 90 minutes, the study authors said. "Treatment of stroke is very time sensitive. As the saying goes, time is brain," said lead researcher Dr. Kimon Bekelis. "So the faster you intervene, the faster the patient recovers," he said. Bekelis is an instructor at the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, N.H. Primary stroke centers provide integrated care, including timely administration of medications, such as the clot-busting drug tPA (tissue plasminogen activator, also known as alteplase). They also offer special procedures to reduce the ... Read more

Related support groups: Ischemic Stroke, Transient Ischemic Attack, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Intracranial Hemorrhage, Activase, Alteplase, Cathflo Activase

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