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Insulin Prices Skyrocket, Putting Many Diabetics in a Bind

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 29, 2016 – Insulin, a life-saving medication used to treat diabetes, was discovered nearly 100 years ago, yet the price of the drug has now spiked by 700 percent in just two decades. In early November, Sen. Bernie Sanders, the Vermont Democrat, pointed out that certain insulins had risen from $21 a vial in 1996 to $255 a vial in 2016. Some have likened the insulin price boosts to the recent price hikes for EpiPen – the life-saving medication needed when someone has a serious allergic reaction. Edith Prentiss, 64, of New York City, knows all too well what the rising cost of insulin means for her. She needs insulin to treat her diabetes and stay alive, yet living on a fixed income has forced her to make tough choices on which drug she can afford. "I have other medications I've been on for years, and as they became generic, they got cheaper. Insulin has never gotten any ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Insulin, Lantus, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, EpiPen, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Intravenous Insulin Drip

These Medicines Often Send Americans to ERs

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 – An estimated one in 250 Americans lands in the hospital emergency department each year because of a medication-related reaction or problem, a new federal study finds. Among adults 65 and older, the rate is about one in 100, the study authors said. Remarkably, the medicines causing the most trouble haven't changed in a decade, the researchers noted. Blood thinners, diabetes medicines and antibiotics top the list. These drugs accounted for 47 percent of emergency department visits for adverse drug events in 2013 and 2014, according to the analysis. Among older adults, blood thinners, diabetes medicines and opioid painkillers are implicated in nearly 60 percent of emergency department visits for adverse drug events. "The same drugs are causing the most problems," said study co-author Dr. Daniel Budnitz. The study doesn't tease out what went wrong. The reasons ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Diabetes, Type 2, Back Pain, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, Tramadol, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Warfarin, Coumadin, Subutex

Low Blood Sugar Linked to Death Risk for Hospital Patients

Posted 17 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 – Hospital patients with low blood sugar may be at increased risk for death, a new study from Israel suggests. The study included nearly 3,000 patients with low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Nearly 32 percent died by the end of the follow-up period. For patients with moderate hypoglycemia, the risk of death was higher among those taking insulin than among those not taking insulin. For those with severe hypoglycemia, death risk was the same in both groups. The reason for hospital admission had no effect on the association between blood sugar levels and death risk, according to the study. It was published Nov. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. "Hypoglycemia is common among hospitalized patients with and without diabetes mellitus. Our findings suggest that hypoglycemia, whether insulin-related or non-insulin related, is associated with short- ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Insulin, Diabetes, Type 1, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Intravenous Insulin Drip

Health Tip: Creating an Insulin Routine

Posted 15 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If you take insulin, you'll need to create a comfortable routine to keep blood glucose under control. The American Diabetes Association explains: Type 1 diabetes typically needs at least two daily injections of two different types of insulin. Type 2 diabetics may need just one daily shot of insulin. Monitor closely how your blood glucose responds to different activities, such as exercise and eating. Find the insulin delivery method that's best for you, whether it's a pen, pump or syringe. Don't forget to change the injection site periodically. Talk to your doctor if you're not sure that your insulin dose is appropriate. Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Insulin, Diabetes, Type 1, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Gestational Diabetes

When Soda Makers Fund Studies, Links to Obesity Weaken

Posted 31 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 – If you come across a study claiming that sugary drinks don't cause obesity or diabetes, check to see who's paid for the research. Most likely the study has financial ties to the beverage industry, according to a new review of the scientific evidence. Every experimental study that found no link between sugary drinks and obesity or diabetes has received financial support from the beverage industry, said lead researcher Dr. Dean Schillinger. He's a professor of medicine and founding director of the University of California, San Francisco's Center for Vulnerable Populations. On the other hand, nearly all experimental studies that establish a direct link between consuming sugary drinks and developing obesity and diabetes have not received funding from beverage makers, Schillinger and his colleagues reported. "The industry seems to be using the scientific method to ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Obesity, Insulin, Weight Loss, Diabetes Mellitus

Exercise Can Help Manage Type 1 Diabetes

Posted 14 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 – Aerobic exercise can benefit people with type 1 diabetes who are on insulin pumps, a small study suggests. The three-month study found that the six people with type 1 diabetes who did aerobic workouts had better blood sugar control, used less insulin and had fewer high blood sugar events than the seven who did no exercise. The study was published online Oct. 11 in the journal Cell Transplantation. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that causes the body's immune system to attack the body's insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. People with type 1 diabetes are left with little to no insulin – a hormone necessary for the body to use the carbohydrates found in food. Because people with type 1 diabetes don't have enough insulin to meet the body's needs, they must take insulin multiple times a day. This can be done through multiple daily injections, or ... Read more

Related support groups: Insulin, Diabetes, Type 1, Diabetic Ketoacidosis (in DM Type I), Diabetic Coma (in DM Type I)

Children With Diabetes Can Have Bright Future

Posted 4 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 – With proper monitoring and management, children with diabetes can live long and healthy lives, a diabetes expert says. "Although there is no cure at this time, treatment options have significantly improved over the years," said Dr. Jason Klein, a pediatric endocrinologist and head of the Pediatric Diabetes Program at NYU Lutheran Medical Center in New York City. "With insulin pens, pumps and modern devices that allow more precise and continuous day and night monitoring of blood sugar levels, we can make small adjustments in the dosage of insulin to prevent sugar levels from rising or dropping too fast. Excellent glucose control gives patients and their families peace of mind," Klein explained in a university news release. "Regardless of the type of diabetes [type 1 or type 2] a patient may have, education of the patient and the family is extremely important," he ... Read more

Related support groups: Insulin, Diabetes, Type 1, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

FDA Approves 1st 'Artificial Pancreas' for Type 1 Diabetes

Posted 28 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28, 2016 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved the first automated insulin delivery system – a so-called "artificial pancreas" – for people with type 1 diabetes. "This first-of-its-kind technology can provide people with type 1 diabetes greater freedom to live their lives without having to consistently and manually monitor baseline glucose levels and administer insulin," Dr. Jeffrey Shuren, director of the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said in an agency news release. The device – Medtronic's MiniMed 670G – is what's known as a hybrid closed-loop system. That means it monitors blood sugar and then delivers necessary background (also known as basal) insulin doses. The device will also shut off when blood sugar levels drop too low. However, this device isn't yet a fully automated artificial pancreas. People with type 1 ... Read more

Related support groups: Insulin, Diabetes, Type 1, Diagnosis and Investigation, Diabetic Ketoacidosis (in DM Type I), Diabetic Coma (in DM Type I)

Pilots on Insulin Therapy Can Safely Fly Commercial Planes: Study

Posted 13 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 13, 2016 – Commercial airline pilots on insulin therapy who keep their diabetes under tight control can perform their job without safety concerns, a new British study concludes. In the United States, however, pilots with insulin-dependent diabetes are prohibited from flying commercial aircraft, the researchers said. A concern is that long flights can interrupt eating and treatment routines, and could lead to low blood sugar levels. Two countries, the United Kingdom and Canada, allow people with diabetes treated with insulin to fly commercial aircraft – if they can show they understand their condition and have it under excellent control, according to the study authors. These pilots are overseen by the U.K. Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) and Irish Aviation Authority. "A growing number of insulin-treated pilots have successfully applied for commercial pilots' licenses in ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Insulin, Diabetes, Type 1, Insulin Resistance, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Intravenous Insulin Drip

Intensive Type 2 Diabetes Treatment Can Extend Survival: Study

Posted 8 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7, 2016 – Intensive management of type 2 diabetes can make a difference in how long and how well you live, even if you don't start until middle age, researchers report. People who were already at risk of type 2 diabetes complications were randomly selected to continue with their normal treatment or to be placed in an aggressive and multipronged treatment group. Two decades after the study began, the researchers found that people in the aggressive treatment group lived almost eight years longer. Not only that, they lived better – their risk of heart disease, kidney disease and blindness all dropped. The only complication that didn't seem to improve was nerve damage caused by diabetes. "Early, intensified intervention in type 2 diabetes patients with microalbuminuria with both target-driven pharmacological (medication) and behavioral actions increased life span. And, ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Metformin, Insulin, Victoza, Lantus, Januvia, Glucophage, Novolog, Glipizide, Humalog, Janumet, Byetta, Saxenda, Glyburide, Bydureon, Lantus Solostar, Invokana, Levemir, Actos, Glimepiride

Health Tip: The Pluses of Using an Insulin Pump

Posted 16 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

-- An insulin pump delivers insulin directly, without messing with syringes and bottles of insulin. The American Diabetes Association mentions these likely benefits: No more single injections of insulin. More accurate dosing and delivery of insulin. More stable blood sugar, including fewer severe lows. Greater flexibility in when and what you eat. No unpredictable reactions to long-acting or intermediate-acting insulin. Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Insulin, Diabetes, Type 1, Insulin Resistance, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Intravenous Insulin Drip

Intensive Blood Sugar Control May Be Too Much for Some With Type 2 Diabetes

Posted 6 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 6, 2016 – Intensive treatment of blood sugar levels in some people with type 2 diabetes may cause serious complications, new research suggests. "In this study, we found that, particularly among older patients and patients with serious chronic conditions, intensive treatment nearly doubled the risk of severe hypoglycemia requiring medical attention, including hospitalization," said lead author Dr. Rozalina McCoy. She is an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is a serious potential complication of diabetes treatment. The researchers said it can worsen quality of life and has been linked with cardiovascular events, dementia and death. The researchers reviewed information from more than 31,500 American adults. All had stable and controlled type 2 diabetes. None was taking insulin. None had a prior history of severe ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Metformin, Insulin, Lantus, Dementia, Glucophage, Novolog, Glipizide, Humalog, Hypoglycemia, Janumet, Glyburide, Lantus Solostar, Invokana, Levemir, Actos, Glimepiride, Novolin R, Amaryl, Mild Cognitive Impairment

Could Infant Colds, Other Infections Raise Type 1 Diabetes Risk?

Posted 3 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 – Colds and other infections in the first six months of life may boost the odds of a child developing type 1 diabetes by nearly 20 percent, new research suggests. The suspicion that infections play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes isn't new. Experts have long suspected that viral infections may trigger the disease. "This study really just bolsters the idea of early life events being crucial for the development of the immune system," said Jessica Dunne, director of discovery research for JDRF (formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation). JDRF provided some of the funding for the new study. "But the jury is still out," she added. And the study authors themselves noted that their study can't prove a cause-and-effect relationship. It also isn't clear exactly how such infections might play a role in type 1 diabetes. "Various mechanisms have been ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Insulin, Influenza, Diabetes, Type 1, Cold Symptoms, Sore Throat

Cost of Insulin Rises Threefold in Just a Decade: Study

Posted 5 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 5, 2016 – Americans with diabetes who rely on insulin to keep their blood sugar levels in check are facing sticker shock: A new study finds the price of insulin has tripled in only 10 years. Moreover, since 2010, per-person spending on insulin in the United States was more than spending on all other diabetes drugs, the study found. "The cost of insulin has risen rapidly over the last few years," said study senior author Philip Clarke, a professor of health economics at the University of Melbourne in Australia. Clarke added there should be an assessment to see whether this price hike is justifiable in terms of improved clinical outcomes. One reason for the price climb, he said, is a switch from human insulins to analog insulins, which cost more but may offer additional benefits. Also, doctors are more apt to prescribe insulin for people with type 2 diabetes now, Clarke ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Metformin, Insulin, Victoza, Lantus, Diabetes, Type 1, Januvia, Glucophage, Novolog, Diabetic Neuropathy, Glipizide, Humalog, Insulin Resistance, Janumet, Diabetic Nerve Damage, Byetta, Saxenda, Glyburide, Bydureon, Lantus Solostar

Type 1 Diabetes Linked to Epilepsy Risk, Study Suggests

Posted 1 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 31, 2016 – People who have type 1 diabetes may be nearly three times more likely to develop the seizure disorder epilepsy than people without type 1 diabetes, a new study suggests. The youngest people with type 1 diabetes – under 6 years old – seemed to be six times more likely to develop epilepsy, the researchers reported. But, those with the highest risk of epilepsy appeared to be children with type 1 diabetes who had to be treated in a hospital for a severe low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). The study found the risk of epilepsy was 16.5 times higher for these children. It should be noted, however, that the study did not establish a cause-and-effect relationship between the two conditions. And the "absolute" risk of any one person with type 1 diabetes going on to develop epilepsy remains very small. Epilepsy is a brain disorder affecting less than 1 percent of the U.S. ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Insulin, Epilepsy, Diabetes, Type 1, Seizure Prevention, Seizure Prophylaxis

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