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Infections News

Tissue Testing Can Spot Zika at Birth: CDC

Posted 16 hours ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 – Exposure to the Zika virus in pregnancy can wreak havoc on babies, but diagnosing the infection before birth remains a challenge. Now, there's some good news: U.S. health officials say testing placental and fetal tissue after a child is born can confirm or rule out infection. Such testing found that only 1 in 10 who were in danger of being infected actually were, and infection didn't automatically mean birth defects, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday. "Testing of placental tissues from live births can continue to be considered when results of maternal Zika virus testing are not definitive or testing is not performed within the optimal time," said the researchers led by Dr. Sarah Reagan-Steiner, of the CDC's National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases. Zika infection is most often spread by ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Infections, Contraception, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Viral Infection, Diagnosis and Investigation, Insect Bites, Cesarean Section, Zika Virus Infection, Wound Infection

Group Urges Tougher Limits on Chemical in Soaps, Cosmetics

Posted 2 days 16 hours ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 20, 2017 – The germ-fighting chemical triclosan has got to go, an international coalition of scientists claims. Triclosan is found in thousands of products ranging from soap and cosmetics to toothpaste and common household items. But evidence has shown that antimicrobials like triclosan not only fall short in killing bacteria, but they may also harm human health, the coalition said in urging much stricter limits on use of the chemical. This follows action last year by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to ban triclosan, triclocarban and 17 other microbial agents from hand soap and body wash sold in the United States because they "are not generally recognized as safe and effective." The FDA's move prompted major manufacturers – such as Johnson & Johnson and Procter & Gamble – to begin phasing them out. But triclosan still is found in hundreds of consumer products, ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Thyroid Disease, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Poisoning, Triclosan, Digiclean, Digiclean Slim-Line, Antiseptic Hand Soap, Sanygel, Bacti-Stat, Septisol, Wound Infection, Cetaphil Antibacterial, Digiclean E, Aktif, Gel-X, Aquasept, Asept, Septi-Soft

Strike Back Against Snake Bites

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 19, 2017 – With summer comes a higher risk of snake bites, but emergency doctors have some advice on what to do if you are bitten. A car or cellphone are vital first aid items after a snake bite, because you should immediately call 911 or head to a hospital emergency room, according to Dr. Justin Arnold. He's an emergency medicine doctor at the University of Alabama Hospital in Birmingham. Don't try to catch the snake – it could bite again – and don't take it with you to the hospital. But take a photo of it if you can do so safely. Don't apply a tourniquet or use a venom extractor kit, and do not apply ice. Stay calm. On average, fewer than 10 people die of snakebites each year in the United States. Once at the hospital, don't be surprised if you do not immediately get antivenin. Doctors will watch your vital signs and any swelling near your bite, said Arnold, who is ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Venomous Snake Bite, Wound Infection

U.S. Hospitals Still Prescribe Too Many Antibiotics: Study

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 15, 2017 – About 20 percent of U.S. hospital patients who receive antibiotics experience side effects from the drugs, researchers report. The new study included nearly 1,500 hospitalized adults who were prescribed antibiotics. The findings revealed that one-fifth of those who experienced antibiotic-related side effects didn't require the drugs in the first place. The results add to growing evidence that antibiotics are overused, according to the Johns Hopkins Hospital researchers. "Too often, clinicians prescribe antibiotics even if they have a low suspicion for a bacterial infection, thinking that even if antibiotics may not be necessary, they are probably not harmful. But that is not always the case," said Dr. Pranita Tamma. She is director of the hospital's Pediatric Antimicrobial Stewardship Program. Antibiotics can cause real harm and doctors should always consider ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Doxycycline, Bactrim, Cipro, Ciprofloxacin, Augmentin, Levaquin, Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole, Nitrofurantoin, Minocycline, Bacterial Skin Infection, Clavulanate, Macrobid, Levofloxacin, Bactrim DS, Tetracycline, Amoxicillin/Clavulanate, Avelox

Staph Aureus Rates Of Resistance To Certain Antibiotics Show A Decrease Over Time

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 13, 2017 – Staphylococcus aureus infections among U.S. hospital patients have been less resistant to key antibiotics in recent years, a new study finds. Between 2009 and 2015, researchers tested antibiotic resistance in more than 19,000 S. aureus samples from 42 medical centers nationwide. "Results showed that S. aureus' rates of resistance to certain antibiotics decreased over time, which isn't often seen," study co-author Dr. Helio Sader said in an American Society for Microbiology news release. Sader is senior director of microbiology and surveillance at JMI Laboratories in North Liberty, Iowa. Rates of S. aureus resistance to the antibiotic oxacillin (Bactocill) fell from 47.2 percent in 2009 to 43.6 percent in 2015 to 42.2 percent in 2016. S. aureus resistance to other antibiotics, such as levofloxacin (Levaquin), clindamycin (Cleocin) and erythromycin, also ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Clindamycin, Bactrim, Levaquin, Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole, Erythromycin, Bacterial Skin Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Levofloxacin, Bactrim DS, Vancomycin, Tetracycline, Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprim, Cleocin, Septra, Pylera, Zyvox, MY-E

A Monkey's 'Smile' May Not Be Sweet

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 12, 2017 – If you mistake a wild monkey's aggressive facial expressions for smiles and kisses, you could end up getting bitten, researchers warn. "There is a growing interest in wildlife tourism, and in particular primate tourism. People travel to encounter wild animals, many of them attempting to closely interact with monkeys, even though this is often prohibited," said Laetitia Marechal, from the University of Lincoln's School of Psychology in England. "Our findings indicate that people who are inexperienced in macaque behavior have difficulties in recognizing monkey's emotions, which can lead to dangerous situations where they think the monkeys are happy but instead they are threatening them," Marechal said in a university news release. The researchers surveyed 124 tourists in destinations where wild Barbary macaques and people freely interact and found that the ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Rabies Prophylaxis, Wound Infection

Legionnaires' Hiding in Hospital, Nursing Home Plumbing Systems: CDC

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 6, 2017 – Deadly Legionnaires' disease is lurking in the water systems of hospitals, nursing homes and long-term care facilities, putting the most vulnerable patients at risk, U.S. health officials said Tuesday. About 10 percent of people who get Legionnaires' disease die from it, but in health care facilities the death rate is higher – 25 percent of those patients die if they get the disease, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Legionnaires' disease in health care facilities is widespread, deadly and preventable," CDC Acting Director Dr. Anne Schuchat said during a noon press briefing Tuesday. Despite the CDC's efforts to get health care facilities to develop effective water management programs, more is needed to protect patients from this deadly bacteria, she said. Legionnaires' disease is a serious lung infection that ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Legionella Pneumonia

Hand Washing Works Whether the Water's Hot or Cold

Posted 1 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 1, 2017 – You don't need to scald your hands to get rid of germs. For effective hand hygiene, water temperature matters less than time, new research states. The finding runs counter to U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines recommending that food establishments and restaurants deliver water at 100 degrees Fahrenheit for hand washing, the researchers said. Scientists at Rutgers University in New Jersey said they found that cold water is as effective as hot in getting rid of harmful bacteria and other germs. What's more important, they said, is that people scrub their hands with soap for at least 10 seconds. "People need to feel comfortable when they are washing their hands, but as far as effectiveness, this study shows us that the temperature of the water used didn't matter," said Donald Schaffner, a specialist in food science at the university. And, using cold ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Wound Infection

1 in 4 Nursing Home Residents Has Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

Posted 31 May 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 30, 2017 – Multidrug-resistant bacteria, such as E. coli, can be found in more than one-quarter of people living in nursing homes, a research review finds. Reviewing eight prior studies, researchers reported rates ranged from 11 percent of residents to an alarming 59 percent, with 27 percent the average. "Nursing home residents are at higher risk to become colonized with these bacteria," said study author Sainfer Aliyu, a doctoral candidate at Columbia University School of Nursing in New York City. But just because nursing home residents are colonized with the bacteria doesn't mean they have an illness. "Someone who is colonized has the bacteria on them, but may not know it. They may not show any symptoms. But they can spread the germ to others, and they have the potential to become sick themselves," Aliyu said. As the nation's "superbug" list grows, health officials are ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection

Can People 'Sniff' Out Illness in Others?

Posted 30 May 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 30, 2017 – People's ability to use smell and vision to detect and avoid others who are sick is better than believed, a new study suggests. Researchers injected harmless bacteria into volunteers, to trigger classic symptoms of illness such as tiredness, pain and fever. These study participants were photographed and filmed, and odor samples were taken from them. Another group of people were given brain scans while they were shown the images and exposed to the odor of the "ill" group along with a "control group" of healthy people. These volunteers were then asked to identify which people in the two groups looked sick, which they considered attractive and which they might socialize with. "Our study shows a significant difference in how people tend to prefer and be more willing to socialize with healthy people than those who are sick and whose immune system we artificially ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Influenza, Cold Symptoms, Sore Throat

Scientists Tweak #Vancomycin to Boost Power Against 'Superbugs'

Posted 30 May 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 30, 2017 – Health experts have long warned about the looming health threat posed by "superbug" bacteria that can mutate to resist antibiotics. But now scientists say they've modified an existing antibiotic, vancomycin, to make it a much more potent fighter against these germs. "Doctors could use this modified form of vancomycin without fear of resistance emerging," research leader Dale Boger of The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., said in an institute news release. As Boger's team explained, vancomycin has been used for 60 years, but bacteria are now developing resistance to it. The drug works by disrupting how bacteria form their cellular walls. Vancomycin is "magical" for its proven ability to fight infections, said Boger, who is co-chair of Scripps' department of chemistry. Previously, he and his colleagues showed that two modifications to the antibiotic ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection, Vancomycin, Vancocin, Vancocin HCl, Wound Infection, Vancocin HCl Pulvules, Lyphocin

Health Tip: Dealing With a Dog Bite

Posted 29 May 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Dog bites happen, even if parents are careful. Knowing the steps to take quickly can help keep your child safe. Here's advice from the American Academy of Pediatrics: Ask the dog's owners for their contact information, proof of rabies vaccination and contact information for the dog's veterinarian. As soon as possible, use soap and water to wash the wound. Call your child's pediatrician to ask if the bite needs treatment. The doctor may notify police of the bite. Carry out your pediatrician's wound care instructions. If your child has a severe bite, call 9-1-1 or go to the emergency room. If possible, be aware of the last time your child had a tetanus shot, the dog's vaccination history and any history about whether the dog has bitten before. Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Skin Infection, Tetanus, Wound Infection

5 Essential Tips for Hospital Patients and Their Visitors

Posted 28 May 2017 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, May 28, 2017 – Infections picked up in the hospital can be serious, even life-threatening. But patients and their visitors can help prevent the spread of dangerous germs by keeping their hands clean, health care professionals say. The American Association of Nurse Anesthetists recommends the following five tips for all hospital patients and their visitors: Don't touch your face, eyes, nose, mouth or any open cuts or wounds after touching anything in the hospital room, such as bed rails, tables, doorknobs, TV remotes or the phone. Sanitize your cell phone before using it in the hospital. Wash your hands with soap or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer before holding the hand of a patient or loved one. This can help reduce – but not eliminate – germs such as C. difficile, which can cause diarrhea. Avoid eating with unclean hands. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection

Health Tip: Is Your Backyard Safe?

Posted 26 May 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Want to make playtime safer for your children? Look no further than your own backyard. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers these suggestions: Keep outdoor stairways clear, and install handrails on both sides. All walkways, porches and stairs should be well lit. Always watch children playing in the backyard. Keep your yard free of tall grass, litter and brush to discourage animal nests. If you have a septic tank, keep it well maintained to protect your family from illness. If your household drinking water source is a well, test it often. Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Head Injury, Prevention of Fractures

Can Tracking Germs in One Hospital Make All Hospitals Safer?

Posted 24 May 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 24, 2017 – One hospital's germ history may help doctors curb infections in all hospitals, researchers report. Scientists analyzed more than 10,000 samples collected over 12 months from surfaces, air and water in the University of Chicago's new hospital, the Center for Care and Discovery. Samples were also taken from 252 patients. The samples were collected for two months before the hospital opened in February 2013, and for 10 months after the opening. Germ DNA was detected in 6,523 of the samples. But the makeup of those germs changed drastically once there were humans in the building. "Before it opened, the hospital had a relatively low diversity of bacteria," said study author Jack Gilbert, director of the Microbiome Center at the University of Chicago. "But as soon as it was populated with patients, doctors and nurses, the bacteria from their skin took over." Another ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Urinary Tract Infection, Bacterial Infection, Bladder Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection

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