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Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis News

Esbriet, Ofev Approved to Treat Deadly Lung Disease

Posted 16 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 16, 2014 – Two new drugs have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat progressive lung scarring from an uncertain cause, medically called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Approval was given to Esbriet (pirfenidone) and Ofev (nintedanib), the agency said in news releases on Wednesday. Symptoms of IPF include shortness of breath, cough and difficulty engaging in everyday activities. Current treatments include supplemental oxygen, lung transplant or lung rehabilitation. Esbriet, produced for Brisbane, Calif.-based InterMune Inc., was evaluated in three clinical trials involving 1,247 people with IPF. The most common side effects included nausea, rash, abdominal pain, upper respiratory tract infection, diarrhea, fatigue and headache. Esbriet shouldn't be taken by people with severe liver problems or severe kidney disease, including people on ... Read more

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FDA Approves Ofev (nintedanib) for Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

Posted 15 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

October 15, 2014 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Ofev (nintedanib) for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which the lungs become progressively scarred over time. As a result, patients with IPF experience shortness of breath, cough, and have difficulty participating in everyday physical activities. Current treatments for IPF include oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, and lung transplant. “Today’s Ofev approval expands the available treatment options for patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a serious, chronic condition,” said Mary H. Parks, M.D., deputy director of the Office of Drug Evaluation II in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Providing health care professionals and patients with additional treatment options helps enable appropriate care decisions based on a ... Read more

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FDA Approves Esbriet (pirfenidone) for Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

Posted 15 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

October 15, 2014 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Esbriet (pirfenidone) for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which the lungs become progressively scarred over time. As a result, patients with IPF experience shortness of breath, cough, and have difficulty participating in everyday physical activities. Current treatments for IPF include oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, and lung transplant. “Esbriet provides a new treatment option for patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a serious, chronic lung disease,” said Curtis J. Rosebraugh, M.D., M.P.H., director of the Office of Drug Evaluation II in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “We continue to help advance medication therapies by approving products that treat conditions that impact public health.” The FDA granted Esb ... Read more

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Scientists Spot New Clues to a Deadly Lung Disease

Posted 11 Jun 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 11, 2014 – Scientists believe they've found a key biological player in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a uniformly fatal lung disease that kills thousands of Americans each year. The finding may be another step forward for patients who have typically had a bleak prognosis. Last month, studies revealed that two new medications might offer some hope for the first effective treatment of IPF. Without a lung transplant, IPF remains an incurable, progressive disease that causes tissue deep in the lungs to stiffen and scar. Seventy percent of patients die within five years. According to the Coalition for Pulmonary Fibrosis, more than 128,000 Americans suffer from IPF, with 40,000 dying from the disease each year. The disease starts with shortness of breath or a dry, hacking cough, but soon robs the person's body of the oxygen needed to move about or properly function, ... Read more

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Two Drugs Offer Hope for Fatal Lung Disease

Posted 18 May 2014 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, May 18, 2014 – A pair of drugs offers new hope to patients with a progressive, fatal disease that robs their breath by scarring the lungs, according to clinical trial results. Both drugs, pirfenidone and nintedanib, appear to slow the advance of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, or IPF, an incurable and previously untreatable disease that causes tissue deep in the lungs to stiffen and scar. Patients with IPF have a three-year survival rate of 50 percent, worse than most forms of cancer, said Dr. Gary Hunninghake, a lung disease specialist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Few live longer than five years past diagnosis, and the only way to save their lives is to replace their lungs. "The long and short is, this is a pretty big deal in the field of IPF," Hunninghake said. "It isn't curing the disease. This certainly isn't the end of therapy for these patients. But the idea ... Read more

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Drug Shows Promise Against Deadly Lung Disease

Posted 21 Sep 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 – An experimental drug may offer a thin ray of hope to people suffering from the rapidly fatal lung disease known as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The compound, currently known only as BIBF 1120, seems to slow the disease, decrease exacerbations and improve quality of life for patients, according to a study funded by the drug's maker, Boehringer Ingelheim, that is published in the Sept. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. "It improves the course of disease and, in my opinion, it's the first drug to significantly ameliorate the really devastating progression of the disease," said Dr. Norman Edelman, chief medical officer for the American Lung Association, who noted that current treatments for the disease "are almost desperation attempts. There's very little evidence they work." "The authors don't claim [BIBF 1120] is going to reverse the disease. They ... Read more

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Virus Unlikely to Advance Deadly Lung Disease: Study

Posted 25 Feb 2011 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 25 – Most patients struggling with a progressive and fatal form of lung disease called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis do not risk a worsening of their condition as a result of exposure to a viral infection, new research indicates. The finding contradicts prior investigations that had suggested viral infections might rapidly advance disease in patients diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). "The results of this study suggest that the majority of cases of acute exacerbation of IPF are not due to viral infection," study author Dr. Harold Collard, director of the Interstitial Lung Disease Program at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), said in a news release from the American Thoracic Society. Collard and colleagues from the United States, Korea and Japan report their observations online in advance of publication in an upcoming print issue of the ... Read more

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Viagra May Aid Those With Lung Fibrosis

Posted 18 May 2010 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 18 – People with a serious lung disease that causes progressive scarring of the lung tissue might get some relief from sildenafil, the drug used in Viagra, a new study finds. The disease, called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, causes the lungs to become increasingly thick and stiff, reducing the ability to breathe. There's no known cause, and there's little in the way of treatment, researchers say. Most people with the disease live just three to five years after diagnosis. "There are about 150,000 patients in the United States and about 5 million worldwide with the disease," said lead researcher, Dr. David A. Zisman, from the Sansum Clinic in Santa Barbara, Calif. He cited Jerry Lewis, Evel Knievel and Robert Goulet as celebrities who had the disease, which he said has "no proven therapy, except lung transplantation, and survival is quite limited." His research team decided ... Read more

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Genetic Breakthrough Spells Hope for Lung Fibrosis Patients

Posted 8 Jul 2009 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 8 – Genes that can help doctors predict when patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are becoming seriously ill have been identified by U.S. researchers, who said the findings might help keep patients alive until they can get a lung transplant. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a lung-scarring disease that progresses slowly and causes a gradual decline in lung function. There is no cure or effective treatment for IPF, and median survival is about three years. However, some patients experience a more rapid deterioration. "Approximately 10 percent of patients develop an acute phase that in most cases is lethal," senior study author Dr. Naftali Kaminski said in a news release. She is director of the interstitial lung diseases center at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. In a study designed to learn more ... Read more

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Drug Found Ineffective Against Lung Disease

Posted 29 Jun 2009 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 29 – Treatment with interferon gamma-1b (Ifn-g1b) does not improve survival in people with a fatal lung disease called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, according to a study that was halted early after no benefit to participants was found. Previous research had suggested that Ifn-g1b might benefit people with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, particularly those with mild to moderate disease. The new study included 826 people, ages 40 to 79, who lived in Europe and North America. They were given injections of either 200 micrograms of Ifn-g1b (551 people) or a placebo (275) three times a week. After a median of 64 weeks, 15 percent of those in the Ifn-g1b group and 13 percent in the placebo group had died. Symptoms such as flu-like illness, fatigue, fever and chills were more common among those in the Ifn-g1b group than in the placebo group. The two groups had similar rates of ... Read more

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Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Pulmonary Fibrosis

Related Drug Support Groups

Esbriet, Ofev, nintedanib, pirfenidone, interferon gamma-1b, Actimmune