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Ibuprofen / phenylephrine News

What Really Works to Fight a Stubborn Cough?

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 – If you're looking for a cough remedy this cold season, you might be out of luck. Nothing has been proven to work that well, according to a new report from the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP). After reviewing clinical trials testing everything from cough syrups to zinc, an ACCP panel came to some less-than-positive conclusions: Over-the-counter medicines – including cold and cough products and anti-inflammatory painkillers – cannot be recommended. Nor is there evidence supporting most home remedies – though, the group says, honey is worth a shot for kids. Every season, most people probably battle at least one cold-induced cough, said report author Dr. Mark Malesker. And they apparently want relief. In 2015, Americans spent more than $9.5 billion on over-the-counter cold/cough/allergy remedies, according to the report. "But if you look at the ... Read more

Related support groups: Hydrocodone, Cough, Codeine, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Advil, Diclofenac, Aleve, Voltaren, Mobic, Motrin, Fioricet, Excedrin, Tylenol PM, Pseudoephedrine, Indomethacin, Dry Cough, Mucinex DM, Toradol

Opioids Not the Only Answer for Pain Relief in the ER

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 – As the opioid epidemic continues to sweep across the United States, a new study suggests that a combination of Motrin and Tylenol may work as well as narcotic painkillers for ER patients who suffer sprains or fractures. "Although this study focused on treatment while in the emergency department, if we can successfully treat acute extremity pain with a non-opioid combination painkiller in there, then we might be able to send these patients home without an opioid prescription," said lead researcher Dr. Andrew Chang. He is a professor of emergency medicine at Albany Medical Center, in Albany, N.Y. "We know that some patients who are given an opioid prescription will become addicted, so if we can decrease the number of people being sent home with an opioid prescription, then we can prevent people from becoming addicted in the first place," Chang suggested. Ibuprofen ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Oxycodone, Surgery, Tramadol, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Opiate Dependence, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid

What You Can Do to Help Fight the Opioid Epidemic

Posted 13 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 13, 2017 – Proper disposal of prescription painkillers and use of safe alternatives to manage pain could help combat America's opioid abuse epidemic, doctors say. "Today, we are in the midst of an opioid crisis," said Dr. David Ring, chairman of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons' (AAOS) Committee on Patient Safety. In 2015, about 12.5 million Americans misused prescription opioids (such as OxyContin and Vicodin) and more than 15,000 overdose deaths were attributed to the drugs, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. "Orthopaedic surgeons, along with other physicians and health care professionals, are working diligently and collectively to reduce the strength and number of opioid pills prescribed for patients, and to change the patient-doctor conversation regarding pain: how pain can be safely managed with non-opioid medications, ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Oxycodone, Tramadol, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Opiate Dependence, Morphine, Opiate Withdrawal, Codeine, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid

Common Painkillers May Boost Blood Pressure in Arthritis Patients

Posted 30 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30, 2017 – Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen may raise blood pressure in patients with arthritis, a new study suggests. "The current findings suggest that the elevated cardiovascular risk with NSAIDs may be partly due to drug-specific increases in blood pressure," said principal investigator Dr. Frank Ruschitzka. He is co-head of the department of cardiology at the University Heart Centre in Zurich. "Patients with osteoarthritis and arthritis should continue to consult their doctor before taking NSAIDs... and clinicians need to weigh the potential hazards of worsening blood pressure control when considering the use of these agents," Ruschitzka added in a European Society of Cardiology news release. NSAIDs are among the most widely used drugs in the world, with almost 19 percent of Americans routinely using at least one NSAID. Warnings on ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Osteoarthritis, Hypertension, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Advil, Diclofenac, Aleve, Voltaren, Mobic, Motrin, Indomethacin, Toradol, Etodolac, Vicoprofen, Nabumetone, Ketorolac, Flector, Advil PM

Many Migraine Sufferers Given Unecessary Opioids, Study Finds

Posted 25 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 25, 2017 – Too many people with migraines are prescribed potentially addictive opiate painkillers, while too few may be getting recommended medications, a new study suggests. Researchers found that of nearly 2,900 Americans who visited the doctor for migraine relief, 15 percent were prescribed opioids such as oxycodone (OxyContin or Percocet) or hydrocodone (Norco, Vicoprofen). That's despite the fact that the drugs should really be used only as a "last resort," said study lead researcher Dr. Larry Charleston IV. Opioids are not only less effective than recommended migraine drugs, they're also risky, said Charleston, an assistant professor of neurology at the University of Michigan Medical School. Repeated opioid use, he explained, can actually lead to more frequent, or even chronic, migraines. And by now, it's no secret that the drugs have the potential for abuse and ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Oxycodone, Tramadol, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Opiate Dependence, Morphine, Metoprolol, Codeine, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Opana, Topamax, Naproxen

Hernia Patients May Need Fewer Opioids After Surgery, Study Finds

Posted 21 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 21, 2017 – Hernia surgery patients may require far fewer opioid painkillers than they're prescribed, new research suggests. The study included 186 adult patients who had elective inguinal ("groin") hernia repair surgery under local anesthesia with intravenous sedation. Each patient received a prescription for 10 tablets of the opioid painkiller Vicodin (hydrocodone/acetaminophen) to ease their post-surgery pain. But they were also encouraged to use non-opioid medications such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) to manage their pain whenever possible. The researchers found that 86 percent of the patients used less than half of their prescribed Vicodin. Almost two-thirds used no Vicodin at all, relying totally on non-opioid pain medications. "The implication of our study is that, even though surgeons have been careful to limit the number of opioid tablets ... Read more

Related support groups: Hydrocodone, Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Acetaminophen, Advil, Paracetamol, Motrin, Fioricet, Excedrin, Endocet, Tylenol PM, Darvocet-N 100, Acetaminophen/Hydrocodone, Percocet 10/325, Tylenol with Codeine, Tylenol with Codeine 3

Some Medicines Boost Sensitivity to Sun

Posted 17 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 17, 2017 – It's well-known that too much time in the sun puts your skin at risk. But it's extra important to limit sun exposure when you're taking certain prescription medications, a pharmaceutical expert warns. Drug-induced photosensitivity is similar to intense sunburns. It causes severe pain, skin peeling and blistering. People taking certain antibiotics and antidepressants are most at risk, said Cesar Munoz, clinical pharmacy manager in ambulatory care services at Harris Health System in the Houston area. Even some over-the-counter medications can cause photosensitivity, so be sure to read the label of any medication you take. The Skin Cancer Foundation warns that pain-relievers – such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve) – can cause photosensitivity. The degree of skin reaction depends on several factors, such as drug strength and amount of sun ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Amitriptyline, Doxycycline, Naproxen, Cipro, Ciprofloxacin, Nortriptyline, Advil, Levaquin, Aleve, Elavil, Motrin, Minocycline, Levofloxacin, Doxepin, Tetracycline, Imipramine, Avelox, Sunburn, Clomipramine

When Is an Opioid Safe to Take?

Posted 26 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 26, 2017 – Many people in pain are apprehensive about taking an opioid painkiller to ease their suffering, and rightfully so. Widespread use of opioids for pain has led to an epidemic of addiction in the United States. Forty lives are lost to prescription drug overdose every day, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But an opioid painkiller, such as oxycodone (Oxycontin, Percocet) or hydrocodone (Vicoprofen) can sometimes be the best option for treating pain in the short term, particularly right after surgery or during a severe pain flare-up, pain experts say. In those instances, patients and doctors need to work together to make sure a patient's pain is treated while managing their risk of addiction and overdose. "You have to individualize care," said Dr. Edward Michna, an anesthesiologist and pain specialist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Tramadol, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Chronic Pain, Codeine, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Opana, Subutex, Dilaudid

Common Painkillers Tied to Slight Rise in Heart Attack Risk

Posted 10 May 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 9, 2017 – Commonly used painkillers such as Motrin, Advil and Aleve might increase your risk for heart attack, even in the first week of use, a new study suggests. Overall, these drugs and others known as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increase the risk of a heart attack by 20 to 50 percent, compared with not using them, researchers found. For most people, however, this represents only a small increased risk – about 1 percent a year, the researchers said. Still, "from the viewpoint of public health, even small increases in risk of heart attack are important because use of NSAIDs is so widespread," said lead researcher Michele Bally. She's an epidemiologist at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Center. The increased risk of heart attack associated with NSAIDs was seen at any dose taken for one week, one month or more than one month. And the risk ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Celebrex, Advil, Diclofenac, Aleve, Voltaren, Voltaren Gel, Motrin, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Vicoprofen, Flector Patch, Flector, Advil PM, Arthrotec, Advil Cold and Sinus

Don't Let Bugs Dampen Your Outdoor Fun

Posted 17 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, April 15, 2017 – If you've spent any time outdoors recently, you may have found yourself swatting away a fly or mosquito – and that means it's time to bone up on bug avoidance. "Although most bug bites are harmless, some can spread dangerous diseases like Zika virus, dengue, Lyme disease and malaria," said Dr. Lindsay Strowd, an assistant professor of dermatology at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C. "Particularly if you're visiting areas with known insect-borne diseases, it's important to take steps to reduce your risk," Strowd said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. Here are Strowd's tips to avoid unwanted bites. Your best defense against insect bites is to cover yourself – with bug spray and clothes. Apply insect repellent with 20 to 30 percent DEET. If you're also wearing sunscreen, apply your sunscreen first, let it dry, and ... Read more

Related support groups: Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Benadryl, Acetaminophen, Advil, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Promethazine, Claritin, Loratadine, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Paracetamol, Motrin, Phenergan, Fioricet

Chiropractors Not Magicians When It Comes to Chronic Back Pain

Posted 11 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 – Chiropractors can help ease some cases of low back pain, though their treatments may be no better than taking an over-the-counter pain reliever, a new analysis finds. The review of 26 clinical trials found that manipulating the spine can bring "modest" relief to people with acute low back pain – pain that has lasted no more than six weeks. Chiropractors perform spinal manipulation, as do some doctors, physical therapists and other health professionals. Most insurers, Medicare and Medicaid pay for some chiropractic services, according to the American Chiropractic Association. But spinal manipulation is no magic bullet, the researchers behind the new study said. The benefits appear similar to those of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen and naproxen. It seems that when it comes to low back pain, no one has found a quick fix. That ... Read more

Related support groups: Back Pain, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Sciatica, Advil, Aleve, Motrin, Scoliosis, Vicoprofen, Advil PM, Advil Cold and Sinus, Treximet, Vimovo, Naprosyn, Naprelan '375', Aleve PM, Naprelan, Radiculopathy, Anaprox, Hydrocodone/Ibuprofen

Marathon Running May Cause Short-Term Kidney Injury

Posted 28 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 28, 2017 – Any marathoner will tell you that the grueling 26-mile races can do a number on the hips, knees, ankles and feet. Now, a small study suggests that these tests of endurance are also tough on the kidneys. "Marathon runners demonstrate transient or reversible short-term kidney injury," said Dr. Chirag Parikh, professor of medicine at Yale University. In his study of 22 participants in the 2015 Hartford, Conn. Marathon, Parikh found that 82 percent showed acute kidney injury after the race. In this condition, the kidneys fail to filter waste from the blood. The good news is that the kidney injury seems to clear up within two days of the race, he said. "On day 2, they are all fine," Parikh said. Runners likely don't even know they've had this transient injury, Parikh said. "For the short term, I don't think they would notice anything," he said. Parikh isn't certain ... Read more

Related support groups: Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Acetaminophen, Advil, Aleve, Renal Failure, Paracetamol, Motrin, Fioricet, Excedrin, Endocet, Tylenol PM, Darvocet-N 100, Acetaminophen/Hydrocodone, Percocet 10/325

Drug No Better Than Placebo for Lower Back, Leg Pain

Posted 23 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 22, 2017 – The widely prescribed pain drug pregabalin (brand name: Lyrica) may be no better than a placebo when it comes to treating the back and leg pain known as sciatica, a new clinical trial suggests. The study, published March 22 in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that sciatica patients improved to the same degree whether they were given pregabalin or placebo capsules. Sciatica refers to pain that radiates along the sciatic nerve, which branches from the low back through the hips and down each leg, according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health. The pain typically shoots down the back of the leg, and some people also have numbness, tingling or muscle weakness. The problem is caused by compression of the sciatic nerve – possibly from a herniated spinal disc. Pregabalin is prescribed to treat various forms of nerve-related pain. In the United ... Read more

Related support groups: Back Pain, Lyrica, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Sciatica, Advil, Aleve, Pregabalin, Herniated Disc, Motrin, Scoliosis, Vicoprofen, Advil PM, Advil Cold and Sinus, Treximet, Naprosyn, Vimovo, Naprelan '375', Aleve PM, Naprelan

Kids' OD Risk Rises When Opioids Left Out at Home

Posted 20 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 20, 2017 – A child's risk of a potentially fatal drug overdose more than doubles if a parent brings home a prescription opioid painkiller like oxycodone, codeine or morphine, a new study reports. When their mother is prescribed an opioid for pain as opposed to a non-narcotic drug like aspirin, ibuprofen or acetaminophen, young children are about two-and-a-half times more likely to accidentally overdose, the researchers found. "The opioid epidemic has not skipped children," said Dr. Yaron Finkelstein, a pediatric emergency doctor with the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. "They are also vulnerable to it, even as a third party or innocent bystander." Finkelstein is lead researcher on the study, published online Feb. 20 in Pediatrics. Another study in the journal helps explain the source of some of this risk. Nearly 70 percent of prescription opioids in homes with ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Back Pain, Tramadol, Hydrocodone, Methadone, Percocet, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Opiate Dependence, Morphine, Chronic Pain, Aspirin, Codeine, Lortab, Ibuprofen, Opana

Try Drug-Free Options First for Low Back Pain, New Guidelines Say

Posted 14 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 13, 2017 – People with low back pain should try drug-free remedies – from simple heat wraps to physical therapy – before resorting to medication, according to new treatment guidelines. Low back pain is among the most common reasons that Americans visit the doctor, according to the American College of Physicians (ACP), which released the new guidelines on Monday. The recommendations put more emphasis on nondrug therapies than previous ones have. They stress that powerful opioid painkillers – such as OxyContin and Vicodin – should be used only as a last resort in some cases of long-lasting back pain. Another change: When medication is needed, acetaminophen (Tylenol) is no longer recommended. Recent research has shown it's not effective for low back pain, said Dr. Nitin Damle, president of the ACP. The good news, according to Damle, is that most people with shorter-term ... Read more

Related support groups: Oxycodone, Back Pain, Tramadol, Cymbalta, Hydrocodone, Methadone, OxyContin, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Ibuprofen, Opana, Naproxen, Subutex, Dilaudid, Meloxicam, Sciatica, Opana ER, Advil, Diclofenac

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